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GWguy
08-31-2009, 01:35 PM
.... Microsoft Word came on one 1.2 Mb floppy disk?

The first hard drive available in an original IBM PC was 10 MB?

Why the trip down memory lane? I was just rebuilding a laptop, and the MS Office download was 1.4 GB. Wonder what it will be in another 10 years....

Floyd2004
08-31-2009, 02:12 PM
I remember friggin dial up.
Im not old at all so I came into play with 56k modems.

Animal
08-31-2009, 02:19 PM
.... Microsoft Word came on one 1.2 Mb floppy disk?

The first hard drive available in an original IBM PC was 10 MB?

Why the trip down memory lane? I was just rebuilding a laptop, and the MS Office download was 1.4 GB. Wonder what it will be in another 10 years....
I remember when computers used tubes, logic was hardwired, and you programmed with punch-cards.

kwillia
08-31-2009, 02:28 PM
I remember when computers used tubes, logic was hardwired, and you programmed with punch-cards.

Aaaaageezerchooo! Excuse me. :smile:

GWguy
08-31-2009, 02:29 PM
I remember when computers used tubes, logic was hardwired, and you programmed with punch-cards.

Yup. Worked on a few of those myself. Didn't want to date myself completely... :whistle:

Peepaw95
08-31-2009, 02:32 PM
Yup. Worked on a few of those myself. Didn't want to date myself completely... :whistle:

Dating yourself can be a long, lonely evening!:otter:

crabcake
08-31-2009, 02:34 PM
My first (real) computer after the Commodore 64 was a 486DX2-66 with a 340 (+/-) mb hard drive. That was somewhere around 1995. :jet:

GWguy
08-31-2009, 02:40 PM
My first (real) computer after the Commodore 64 was a 486DX2-66 with a 340 (+/-) mb hard drive. That was somewhere around 1995. :jet:

1980. Control Data 1700 pre-processor. Water cooled. 16 K of memory. Took up the floor space of an average living room. Talked to it with a model 17 teletype, one instruction at a time. Manual toggle switches for the IPL (initial program load), and that load came from a punch tape.

That was just the front-end to the Control Data Cyber computer. What a piece of work that thing was....

Penn
08-31-2009, 02:42 PM
In 1986, stationed at Tyndall AFB, Fla, we worked with Zenith 286 machines, with 20mg hard drives. The modem we used to "talk" to other sections, as well as other fighter alert units was a 28kps model.

Screamingly fast, I tell ya! :lmao:

chess
08-31-2009, 03:30 PM
i have a 2 meg hard drive still

Floyd2004
09-02-2009, 10:50 AM
I wanna say 32meg is the smallest HDD ive ever owned.

Jigglepuff
09-02-2009, 12:27 PM
My first computer was a hand me down 286 (8Mhz), 20Meg HD, 5 1/4 and 3 1/4 floppy. DOS 3.1.

Grew up w/ Commedore 64's and Apple II's in schools.

Penn
09-02-2009, 04:32 PM
Before Windows, every command/entry you wanted to insert, had to be entered from the command prompt, like c:/ delete C:/ * . * (that one deleted all files from the C: drive, if I remember)

We had to do that once every 3 months! :lol:

chess
09-02-2009, 04:43 PM
Before Windows, every command/entry you wanted to insert, had to be entered from the command prompt, like c:/ delete C:/ * . * (that one deleted all files from the C: drive, if I remember)

We had to do that once every 3 months! :lol:

Penn i remember those days !

Severa
09-02-2009, 05:14 PM
My first start on computers was Commodore 64s in 6th grade computer lab.
Took BASIC programming in high school.
I remember when Dad first got Autocad (release 14 IIRC) and it came on a bunch of those 5 1/4" disks.

Penn
09-02-2009, 05:24 PM
Gosh, before the Zenith 286 machines arrived at our office, we had monsters with 8088 chips in them - which used (2) 9 or 10 inch drives.

One carried the Microsoft operating software system, and the other one carried your work files/folders!

That goes wa-a-a-y back there! :lmao:

itsbob
09-02-2009, 05:28 PM
My first (real) computer after the Commodore 64 was a 486DX2-66 with a 340 (+/-) mb hard drive. That was somewhere around 1995. :jet:

That was a HUGE HD for back then..

My first was a 286 with a 20MB HD, and I THINK 512k of memory, when you wanted to upgrade memory you had to but a BUNCH of identical chips to put on the board, and memory was $$$$

HD was about the size of a NetBook, but 3 inches thick, and weighed a ton..

1200 Baud Moden.. soon upgraded to 2400 Baud..

Two floppy drives... 5 1/4"...


BBS'

Yeah, those were the days, pre Netscape, pre Internet Explorer..

aps45819
09-02-2009, 05:42 PM
First one I worked on was the navigation computer for Washington Class SSBN submarines. It consisted of two full size equipment cabinets (19' between the rails and 72" high). Ram memory was tiny iron rings with wires running through them in north/south and east/west intersections in each ring. They could be pulsed into different states of magnetism. The main memory was a magnetic drum about 18" high and 6" in diameter, held a big 1 meg. :lol:
No chips, all state of the art transistors
This was in the mid '70s

Penn
09-02-2009, 05:55 PM
BBS: Is that the symbol for Bulletin Board System?

If so, that was what we used before e-mail was installed on our machines.

You'd log-in to the BBS program, and wait for your user from another office or site, to log-in themselves, and then start your conversation topics.

Multiple users could log-in, and you had something akin to a chat room.

Whew! Stone Age gear, as opposed to what we are using these days.

aps45819
09-02-2009, 06:02 PM
Whew! Stone Age gear, as opposed to what we are using these days.
First day of the 3 month school on how to operate/repair the honker, it locked up while they were showing it to us. Instructor walked around to the side and kicked the crap out of it and it started back up. I howled with laughter and asked why it took three months to learn how to kick the computer.

Most everything aboard ships today is COTS (commercial off the shelf).

FireBrand
09-02-2009, 06:06 PM
This site is a little outdated but interesting...
Cost of Hard Drive Space (http://www.littletechshoppe.com/ns1625/winchest.html)


and DON'T miss out on this bargain !.....

BuckinRut
09-02-2009, 06:10 PM
I remember how excited I was when they taught us how to make it snow on our computers at school. I also remember using a tape recorder for programs and not discs of any kind. Those were the days. :lmao:

SoMdDude
09-03-2009, 12:22 AM
I remember when i received win95 on 17 floppy disks :yahoo:

Jeff
09-03-2009, 12:54 AM
.... Microsoft Word came on one 1.2 Mb floppy disk?

The first hard drive available in an original IBM PC was 10 MB?

Why the trip down memory lane? I was just rebuilding a laptop, and the MS Office download was 1.4 GB. Wonder what it will be in another 10 years....

My first was a Tandy 1000.. Seems like it was 4 Meg Hard drive and I soon upgraded to an 8 meg. The hard drives on these were "OPTIONAL". I then went to the IBM PS/2 and I think I think I still have my old DOS 2.0 around here somewhere. I even had a Handheld Page scanner where you had to run it up one side of a page then down the other then line them up on the screen.

I thought I was cool when I was fiddling with Prodigy back in 91. Heck I was doing online banking back then through NDB. I think the other "ONLINE" service was Compuserve or something similar.

Oh. And we should not forget. Leisure Suit Larry. :yahoo:


But yes this stuff has come a long way.

kom526
09-03-2009, 01:58 AM
10 PRINT "KOM ROCKS"
20 GO TO 10


I think that's right. It's been over 20 years :faint: since I tried that.

GWguy
09-03-2009, 08:16 AM
10 PRINT "KOM ROCKS"
20 GO TO 10


I think that's right. It's been over 20 years :faint: since I tried that.

10 PRINT "KOM ROCKS"
15 IF (KOM.NE.ROCKS) EXIT
20 GO TO 10

I think I mixed languages here... :lol:

kom526
09-03-2009, 08:19 AM
10 PRINT "KOM ROCKS"
15 IF (KOM.NE.ROCKS) EXIT
20 GO TO 10

I think I mixed languages here... :lol:

Pidgin BASIC:nerd:

PsyOps
09-03-2009, 01:17 PM
"640K ought to be enough for anybody."-- Bill Gates

:ohwell:

Floyd2004
09-03-2009, 01:21 PM
"640K ought to be enough for anybody."-- Bill Gates

:ohwell:

Now we are starting to get 15-50meg services...

PsyOps
09-03-2009, 01:37 PM
Now we are starting to get 15-50meg services...

What's ironic about his quote is MS has been at the very front in creating the requirement for more memory and transfer speed.

clevalley
09-03-2009, 01:53 PM
First one I ever screwed around with was a TRS-80, it loaded/saved using a cassette tape. :roflmao:

I think the first I ever did any real work on was a 286 with DOS 3.1 and 5 1/4" floppies, the HDD was less than 20MB. We used WordStar to create reports for the fire department, this was around 1985 or 1986...

The first mainframe I ever worked on were a PDP-11/70 and VAX 11/780. This was right after punch cards got phased out, but we had the toggle switches to load the boot strap on the PDP 11/70, the 11/780 had it's own hard drive, a massive 200MB! :lol:

I remember the first 1GB hard drive, it was about 12" tall, 10" wide and about 24" deep and rack mounted - it weighed around 60 lbs (with all the casing and power supply)... I want to say we got about 20 of them with new storage controllers and 3 shiny new Vax 6000's for a cool 4-6 million, this was somewhere around 1992 or so. :lmao:

clevalley
09-03-2009, 01:55 PM
What's ironic about his quote is MS has been at the very front in creating the requirement for more memory and transfer speed.

Where do you think BloatWare came from? :roflmao:

(yes, we are primarily a MS shop!)

:offtopic: Did you ever figure out that problem you were having with RDP/Terminal Service?

clevalley
09-03-2009, 01:57 PM
10 PRINT "KOM ROCKS"
15 IF (KOM.NE.ROCKS) EXIT
20 GO TO 10

I think I mixed languages here... :lol:


Pidgin BASIC:nerd:

Isn't 'GO TO' suppose to be 'GOTO' ? :tap:

itsbob
09-03-2009, 02:04 PM
Isn't 'GO TO' suppose to be 'GOTO' ? :tap:

That was my VERY first computer class in 1981. Took a BASIC programming class with NO computers, taught by our Squadron Commander.

Never knew if we were having class or not, either I couldn't make it to class because I was in the field, or he wasn't in class because.. well, he was the 1/11th ACR SQDN Commander.

We'd writedcode on tablet paper, desk check it, then turn it in. He didn't have a computer to run it on, so he'd desk check it and give it back with a grade..

He's now a MULTI Millionaire.. and here I sit.

PsyOps
09-04-2009, 11:51 AM
Where do you think BloatWare came from? :roflmao:

(yes, we are primarily a MS shop!)

:offtopic: Did you ever figure out that problem you were having with RDP/Terminal Service?

Another ironic part of this is back when 640k was a lot you'd pay 4 times for that then for what you'd pay for 500 gigs today.

dgates80
09-04-2009, 10:53 PM
Another ironic part of this is back when 640k was a lot you'd pay 4 times for that then for what you'd pay for 500 gigs today.

First machine was a Monro-Litton programmable calculator, if you don't count the MC6800 evaluation kit (which was a CPU and a ROM, that's it).

U of W had a Cyber 73 / CDC 6300 dual mainframe with 128k of extended core. Two sides of the operation, the "batch" side -- turn in your card deck -- and the "interactive" side where you used at VT-100 terminal.

Built an Altair 8008 and later converted it to first an 8080 and tehn a Z80 cpu. front panel switches & paper tape, though later w/ CPM an 8" floppy drive. S-100 bus machines.

Then came the TRS-80 Model II -- worked at a place that had a board stuffing and wave soldering contract with Tandy. Scored a scrap board and a large box of scrap parts, mostly scrapped due to bent pins.

I hand soldered sockets onto the board for all the chips and made a clear plexiglass cast for it. I actually got it to work, too.

Navy had a Harris oddball computer, a 24 bit machine. Odd thing, used mag core memory. which was non-volitile. It had a mag tape drive. Oh, and yes, still front panel switches.

Then there were the Univac 618's and the AN/UYK-20 machines that ran NTDS and teh scopes in CIC. Mag core memory in those, as well.

On to the IBM PCXT and the Kaypro, and the first networks -- remember Token Ring? Novell, which came on a set of 50 or so 5.25" floppies! About that time started working with Sun and HP unix boxes. Arpanet and Gopher servers....

Got into digital video stuff in the early days of that, worked alot with SGI boxes.

Worked a Intel I860 parallel machine for a while, that was a wierd contraption! Got to go the school on it in Portland, the Intel supercomputer systems design center. Saw Oak Ridge's massivly parallel box... kinda cool.

Did some DSP programming along the way....

I don't do computers any more. They are appliances these days. Nowadays I am strictly a user....

Sonsie
09-04-2009, 11:03 PM
In 1988 in the AF I was writing codes for the keypunch operator to type out on her machine to "automate" contract writing. I think we were the last base to move to the high tech Wang system. :lol:

Bann
09-04-2009, 11:08 PM
In high school my 1st period Intro to DP class did the attendance for the school. We took the punch cards from each class & ran them through the machine (I think they called it a calculating machine,(?) but it was a huge thing. Bigger than a desk) and come up with the list of classes & the students present in each class.

Later, I worked for a company in DC that used magnetic tape to record their data which came in to a switching center from ship to shore telex & telephone calls. I was in accounts receivable, so we processed the live data from those tapes & turned it into bills. We used computer terminals connected to a main frame located in the computer room. But we did have 2 Apple PC's (?I think) and a Wang Word Processor that were fairly new at the time, I think. (early 80's)

BuckinRut
09-05-2009, 02:17 AM
Friend of mine dug up a T2200sx (Toshiba) in perfect condition. Neither one of use can figure out how to work it. We assume it has to have a floppy in the drive to boot up, but where on earth would you find the system disks for this mummy?

EmptyTimCup
09-05-2009, 09:06 PM
.... Microsoft Word came on one 1.2 Mb floppy disk?

The first hard drive available in an original IBM PC was 10 MB?

Why the trip down memory lane? I was just rebuilding a laptop, and the MS Office download was 1.4 GB. Wonder what it will be in another 10 years....



I have a Winchester Drive CARD ... ISA Slot of Course and 8 inch Floppies

EmptyTimCup
09-05-2009, 09:08 PM
1980. Control Data 1700 pre-processor. Water cooled. 16 K of memory. Took up the floor space of an average living room. Talked to it with a model 17 teletype, one instruction at a time. Manual toggle switches for the IPL (initial program load), and that load came from a punch tape.

That was just the front-end to the Control Data Cyber computer. What a piece of work that thing was....



I have a PDP 11/05 :popcorn:

EmptyTimCup
09-05-2009, 09:11 PM
in 1982 in my Into to Data Processing class we dialed in with an acoustic modern to the main frame @ PG Com Collage



in yr 2 we had Trash 80 III's with a serial network ....

Penn
09-05-2009, 09:11 PM
I have a PDP 11/05 :popcorn:

Some of you folks are starting to "get nerdy" out there! :lmao:

GWguy
09-06-2009, 11:22 AM
I have a PDP 11/05 :popcorn:
:lol: We used one of those as a terminal server for the VAX back in the early 80s'.


in 1982 in my Into to Data Processing class we dialed in with an acoustic modern to the main frame @ PG Com Collage


I learned on a Model 33 Teletype linked to Stony Brook University over a dedicated wire, hosted by a PDP-11/70, '73-'74. Wasn't easy getting time on it as it was SO slow and you had to manually enter and compile all the FORTRTAN source.

I still have my Atari 800 and ALL the bells and whistles. 360 and 720 K 5.25" floppies, comm controller, thermal printer, various OS disks and software, and tons of documentation. Also have every issue printed of Analog magazine, dedicated to the Atari user.

EmptyTimCup
09-07-2009, 12:26 PM
:lol: We used one of those as a terminal server for the VAX back in the early 80s'.




The first mainframe I ever worked on were a PDP-11/70 and VAX 11/780. This was right after punch cards got phased out, but we had the toggle switches to load the boot strap on the PDP 11/70, the 11/780 had it's own hard drive, a massive 200MB! :lol:


can someone provide a test sequence for my PDP ?

yrs ago I exchanged emails with an old MF Guy ... and he had provided a basic ..

flip 1,5,6, 15 up press load ....

flip x,y,z ... press load


press run ... all the lights should blink now ... If so your PDP is in working order ... and of course I have lost those load seq by now

:coffee:

EmptyTimCup
09-07-2009, 12:30 PM
1980. Control Data 1700 pre-processor.

That was just the front-end to the Control Data Cyber computer. What a piece of work that thing was....



My PDP 11/05 came from a desk housing black planes (with cards) and a box on the top for switching between 4 tape drive units ....

the think must have weighed 500+ lbs with the

3 - 220 V AC 6VDC PSU
PDP 11/05
back planes w/cards