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Thread: Pellet v.s. wood stove

  1. #11
    Had a wood stove. There is nothing like the infrared radiant heat that one gives off, the quiet crackle and the smell of an oak log burning.

    That said, the constant worry of a flue fire from creosote buildup, flue pipe tear down for a good cleaning, the mess that wood logs leave behind and all thru the house, the critters that take up residence in the wood pile, splitting wood........ switched to pellets.

    I dump a 40 lb bag of pellets in and it will last most of a 24 hour day. It has a fan, so the heat is forced thru the house. Cleaning is opening the front door and a 30 second vacuum job, deep cleaning once a year. The pile of pellets stacks in the garage with no mess whatever (unless the bag rips....). No critters. Never have to clean the flue pipe, only dry soot produced, so no fire hazards. 20,000 BTU, hardly ever have to run the furnace. It's worth the cost of the pellets to me for the convenience and cleanliness.

    I got a flexible 3" pipe and ran it from the stove all the way out the top of the chimney (insert stove, not standalone), cost was under $100.

    Should add that my pellet stove is about 25 years old with only a fan replacement in all that time.
    Last edited by GWguy; 10-19-2017 at 12:01 PM.
    "It must be inordinately taxing to be such a boob."
    The Brain

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by steppinthrax View Post
    Thanks,

    I read somewhere that "you can throw 2 sticks of wood in a wood stove and it will heat for 8 hours". I know this was based on a customer review and mileage may vary, but do wood stoves require constant refill throughout the day?

    The new wood stoves burn more efficiently though, use less wood. I'm not too concerned about the heat output. I imagine it would output enough considering I'm going to put the biggest I can put in there and with a blower. I'm looking at wood stoves that are rated for 1200 to 2000 sq feet.

    You said the liner kit is cheap. I'd like to know what kit you used, or maybe I'm overthinking this. I see liner kits (flexible) for around 700 - 1000. Rigid is even more expensive. Are you using just "black pipe"?
    With today's wood stoves, depending on the fire box size, you may only need to fill it a few times a day. Also depends on the type and condition of wood. If it is well seasoned (cut, split and dry for at least a year, I recommend 2 years) it will burn hotter and longer. If its green wood you will need to keep your air damper open more to burn it and it will burn faster and not put out its rated BTU's. There is a learning curve with wood stoves. Also the less seasoned your wood is the more creosote will build up in your chimney which increases your risk for a chimney fire.

    If you go with wood, get a moisture meter. Whatever your wood source is, split a piece and check the freshly split side for its moisture content. 15-20% moisture reading is ideal. With today's modern stoves , they hate non seasoned wood.

  3. #13
    Registered User Grumpy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GWguy View Post
    I dump a 40 lb bag of pellets in and it will last most of a 24 hour day.
    So you're shooting down someone's comment above that it takes 4 bags a day?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    So you're shooting down someone's comment above that it takes 4 bags a day?
    That's what I use. Might go to 2 bags if it's really cold out.

    Ah... I also have a real thermostat on mine. It shuts off if the temps are satisfied. You get longer times on a bag that way.
    "It must be inordinately taxing to be such a boob."
    The Brain

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    So you're shooting down someone's comment above that it takes 4 bags a day?
    I guess there are so many factors, such as stove size, sq ft, temp, insulation. I imagine it can be even less than 1 bag a day if you are talking a tiny basement/living area with high insulation and a properly sized stove.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by frequentflier View Post
    Not too proud to admit I have picked many things up on the side of the road :-)

    Rebate through the State. It took some work to get, though! We had to send before and after pics to prove we replaced the old stove with a new stove.

    Brand name Regency. We like the window to watch it burn, too. It doesn't require filling as much as the old one and it is easy to adjust the temperature. It helps that our home is well insulated. I only wish we could pipe the heat into our attached in law apt.
    We have a (fun) system for loading wood in basement (we have racks from a grocery store with high sides on both ends- perfect!) Husband gets mower and trailer, fills with wood and we put a tarp on basement floor. Open basement door and he flings them down to tarp and I stack.
    Like I said, we enjoy heating with wood!
    Thanks,

    I've been spending my time on this site now.

    http://energy.maryland.gov/Residenti...oodstoves.aspx

    I've been looking at tractor supply for a wood stove. Based on the list there are no wood burning stoves that satisfy the 3.0 gph req. Now the pellet stove that I could find is around 1190. meaning I would pay that much more for pellet which wouldn't really make that much difference after the grant. What model wood stove did you use. I imagine your stove to be in the 1000 - 2000 price range.

  7. #17
    Registered User Midnightrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GWguy View Post
    That's what I use. Might go to 2 bags if it's really cold out.

    Ah... I also have a real thermostat on mine. It shuts off if the temps are satisfied. You get longer times on a bag that way.
    It’s going to vary by stove, set up, design of home and insulation factors. Admittedly the house I was using those two setups in was an old cabin. However, the wood stove was able to heat it better and for less generally speaking.

    You can usually find burn rates for pellet stoves. Mine was rated for 5 bags/24 hours.


    One thing to remember, a pellet stove puts off hot air and a tiny amount of radiant heat. A wood stove does the opposite. Also, most pellet stoves require electricity to work
    "once in a while you can get shown the light in the strangest of places if you look at it right"-TGD

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by frequentflier View Post
    Not too proud to admit I have picked many things up on the side of the road :-)

    Rebate through the State. It took some work to get, though! We had to send before and after pics to prove we replaced the old stove with a new stove.

    Brand name Regency. We like the window to watch it burn, too. It doesn't require filling as much as the old one and it is easy to adjust the temperature. It helps that our home is well insulated. I only wish we could pipe the heat into our attached in law apt.
    We have a (fun) system for loading wood in basement (we have racks from a grocery store with high sides on both ends- perfect!) Husband gets mower and trailer, fills with wood and we put a tarp on basement floor. Open basement door and he flings them down to tarp and I stack.
    Like I said, we enjoy heating with wood!
    By bringing wood in the house (do you store it inside) have you had any problems with termites or carpenter ants

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Midnightrider View Post
    Also, most pellet stoves require electricity to work
    But very low wattage. A very small generator will power it easily. If you're really green, a solar powered battery and inverter will do it.
    "It must be inordinately taxing to be such a boob."
    The Brain

  10. #20
    I bought a pellet stove to replace an old inefficient gas fireplace. I would love a wood stove but it wasnít in the cards as I donít have a masonry chimney and the pellet stove can vent straight back.
    Our stove uses 2 bags a day on the coldest of days to keep ~2400sq ft at a comfortable 73ish degrees. I clean it every week and it takes about 30 minutes with all the right tools. You will have to have a nice dry place to store the pellets though. I have an extended garage so I keep 5 tons on hand for the start of winter. They have moving parts though so something is bound to break eventually.

    If you go pellet stove though I truly believe you get what you pay for. We opted for a high end brand (Harman) and have had 0 issues in the last 4 winters.

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