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Thread: It is always interesting when the Left starts making conservative arguments.

  1. #1
    INGSOC GURPS's Avatar
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    It is always interesting when the Left starts making conservative arguments.

    The Left, however, thought that Chevron deference represented a public benefit. Whether the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created new regulations on the coal or oil industries or if the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB) created restrictive rules against the banking industry, the Left believed that these bureaucrats represented the best interests of the people because they believed that these agencies looked out for their political agenda. By their logic, as long as Republicans in Congress are unable to gut these rules, then there would be no negative consequence for having administrative agencies acting as independent, law-making arbiters wearing the robes of a philosopher king.

    Today, the Left seems to have changed its tone on appealing to the authority of administrative agencies. For example, when Scott Pruitt became Administrator of the EPA, the Left began to champion legal challenges against the EPA's increasing policy of removing or changing regulations. However, the largest about-face that the Left has made with regard to administrative agency deference came yesterday after the FCC voted to revoke the Obama-era "Net Neutrality" rules.

    Suddenly, prominent leftists started railing against the FCC's legitimate authority to overthrow those changes. For example, socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), tweeted that Congress and the courts should fight back against the FCC.



    In addition, 17 state Attorneys General announced that they intend to sue the FCC in order to save the "Net Neutrality" regulations. By their logic, the FCC should be challenged in the courts and by Congress about their agency rules on the grounds that they violate the interests of the people. The only way to make that argument is by overruling Chevron and by giving both Congress and the courts the ability to challenge the procedural and structural merits of administrative agencies like the FCC to make laws and rules.

    This represents a tremendous reversal in how the Left views the power of the administrative state. Earlier this year, the Left chastised Trump's nomination of now-Justice Neil Gorsuch because of his vocal opposition to Chevron deference. Now, the Left seems to be more open to the realization that leaving administrative agencies to unchecked rule-making abilities does not seem to be a legitimate means to govern the people. What is rather ironic about the Left's newfound discovery of limited enumerated constitutional powers is that this does not emanate from principle but rather political convenience. The real question is whether the Left would be willing to (rightfully) overrule Chevron deference in order to earn a victory for "Net Neutrality" in exchange for losing the war against overreaching administrative authority.

    HAMILTON: Since When Did The Left Start Advocating Against Chevron Deference?
    We’re tempted to suggest a conspiracy here — but it’s just liberals agreeing yet again that conservatives have hidden, evil motives, because modern liberals simply can’t conceive of any other reason to disagree with the liberal consensus.

    “Moral precepts are constant through the ages and not obedient to circumstances.”

  2. #2
    Those leftwing moonbats are funny. "The end of the Internet as we know it" they proclaim as they wring their hands and wail at the moon. Yet the silly "neutrality" rules they are so wrung up about were just put in place in 2015. The "internet as we know it" developed in to what it is now over more than 30 years. I first started using it in 1983 myself.
    "Dark humor is like food. Not everyone gets it." - J. Stalin

  3. #3
    I have to admit that on the face of it - whichever side of the fence THIS argument is on - I think it IS fair for cable companies to charge for services that clog their bandwidth.
    I once heard a stat that may be false, but - I've heard that at any given time, 10% of the Internet is Netflix.

    To me, that's kind of like your neighbor asking if he can use your water to irrigate his garden - and you find out he has 50 acres.

    That's the side I'm on - you can't abuse bandwidth without paying for it.
    “Good intentions will always be pleaded for every assumption of authority. It is hardly too strong to say that the Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters.".Daniel Webster

  4. #4
    _______________ Kyle's Avatar
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    Netflix isn't alone anymore.
    ___________________________________________________________
    "If You Don’t Read the Newspaper You Are Uninformed, If You Do Read the Newspaper You Are Misinformed." - Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SamSpade View Post
    I have to admit that on the face of it - whichever side of the fence THIS argument is on - I think it IS fair for cable companies to charge for services that clog their bandwidth.
    I once heard a stat that may be false, but - I've heard that at any given time, 10% of the Internet is Netflix.

    To me, that's kind of like your neighbor asking if he can use your water to irrigate his garden - and you find out he has 50 acres.

    That's the side I'm on - you can't abuse bandwidth without paying for it.
    Put another way: if I build and maintain a network, I and I alone get to decide how to treat various various types of traffic that traverse it. That includes rate limiting and charging more if that’s what I decide. Bandwidth isn’t infinite. The best way to arbitrate is to charge more for certain things. Nothing wrong with that at all.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Starman View Post
    Put another way: if I build and maintain a network, I and I alone get to decide how to treat various various types of traffic that traverse it. That includes rate limiting and charging more if that’s what I decide. Bandwidth isn’t infinite. The best way to arbitrate is to charge more for certain things. Nothing wrong with that at all.
    The ONLY thing I can think of is, as vital as the Internet is - this means a large cable company can block *anything* they want to - news sites it doesn't like, commercial web sites that compete against its partners.

    I suspect that sooner or later, cable companies may be treated a lot more like utility companies. They already kind of DO.

    It's something about cable that I am not crazy about - technology wise, the densest form of data comes down a cable or optical fiber. And it costs a lot to make and maintain, which logically means you can really only have one in town. You can't have two or more companies in charge of the same cables. So if a cable company has the ability to decide and exclude anyone it wants to - it has the ability to censor and control what comes down the pike.

    THAT - I don't like.
    “Good intentions will always be pleaded for every assumption of authority. It is hardly too strong to say that the Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions. There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters.".Daniel Webster

  7. #7
    INGSOC GURPS's Avatar
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    cable companies already decide which channels you can watch ....
    We’re tempted to suggest a conspiracy here — but it’s just liberals agreeing yet again that conservatives have hidden, evil motives, because modern liberals simply can’t conceive of any other reason to disagree with the liberal consensus.

    “Moral precepts are constant through the ages and not obedient to circumstances.”

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