My edge has been crossed for a long time, before President Trump, before Harvey Weinstein, before mansplaining and incels. Before live-streaming sexual assaults and red pill mens groups and rape camps as a tool of war and the deadening banality of male prerogative.

Seen in this indisputably true context, it seems logical to hate men. I cant lie, Ive always had a soft spot for the radical feminist smackdown, for naming the problem in no uncertain terms. Ive rankled at the but we dont hate men protestations of generations of would-be feminists and found the men are not the problem, this system is obfuscation too precious by half.

But, of course, the criticisms of this blanket condemnation of men from transnational feminists who decry such glib universalism to U.S. women of color who demand an intersectional perspective are mostly on the mark. These critics rightly insist on an analysis of male power as institutional, not narrowly personal or individual or biologically based in male bodies. Growing movements to challenge a masculinity built on domination and violence and to engage boys and men in feminism are both gratifying and necessary. Please continue.

Pretty much everywhere in the world, this is true: Women experience sexual violence, and the threat of that violence permeates our choices big and small. In addition, male violence is not restricted to intimate-partner attacks or sexual assault but plagues us in the form of terrorism and mass gun violence. Women are underrepresented in higher-wage jobs, local and federal government, business, educational leadership, etc.; wage inequality continues to permeate every economy and almost every industry; women continue to provide far higher rates of unpaid labor in the home (e.g., child care, elder care, care for disabled individuals, housework and food provision); women have less access to education, particularly at the higher levels; women have lower rates of property ownership.



https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...9e7_story.html