23 and Me......or 25 to life?

Pete

Repete
[URL unfurl="true"]https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-01/major-dna-testing-company-is-sharing-genetic-data-with-the-fbi?utm_medium=social&cmpid=socialflow-twitter-business&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_source=twitter&utm_content=business[/URL]

Interesting development. All of you who were curious about "who you were" and did a home DNA test may now have your DNA shared with the FBI. I know, I know, not a big deal because I have nothing to hide. Well in the article is says that if just 2% of the population provided DNA, that would be enough to link to everyone. See your DNA links to everyone in your family, other relatives. Your DNA could lead the FBI to your 4th cousin twice removed in Utah. I know, I know, screw him, don't do the crime if you can't do the time. Part of me say "What a cool crime fighting tool." part of me is afraid because society today tends to latch on to "technology" and not understand it can be wrong. 100% pre judged guilt.

Imagine if you will you are laying in bed watching......well what the hell does anyone watch late night anymore......when there is a knock on the door. ST Mary's finest and the FBI bust in and drag you out of bed and cuff you on a warrant for rape or something hideous for a Arizona warrant. The FBI got the arrest warrant because you matched up on the DNA with someone who did the test 4 years ago who was the illegitimate offspring of a crazy uncle no one talks about. Because DNA doesn't lie you are immediately guilty.
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Pretty sure it takes a bit more than that sort of cousin connection (offspring of an uncle) before people are knocking down your door. If this references the Golden State Killer, the DNA led to him, but after that link they did a lot more police work before arresting him.

So, the company in the article isn't just dumping all the data on the FBI, and it's not "everybody who has done DNA testing".

"On a case-by-case basis, the company has agreed to test DNA samples for the FBI and upload profiles to its database, allowing law enforcement to see familial matches to crime-scene samples. FamilyTreeDNA said law enforcement may not freely browse genetic data but rather has access only to the same information any user might. "

All that said, I want there to be controls and oversight to ensure the system isnt misused, but I"m generally okay with this.
 

Grumpy

Well-Known Member
All that said, I want there to be controls and oversight to ensure the system isnt misused, but I"m generally okay with this.
Controls and oversight to ensure it isn't misused?? Shirley you jest. IRS records?? NSA databases?? They don't have controls/oversight??
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
I've posted about this before, a guy spent about 6 months proving his innocence after being accused from a DNA Match from one of these companies
 

Lurk

Happy Creepy Ass Cracka
The most vexing part of this situation is that the customer paid and agreed that the company could do whatever they wanted with the results.

Why do people do that?
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
controls and oversight to ensure the system isnt misused
:lmao:

The controllers and overseers are the ones most likely to misuse it.

I would never just give strangers my DNA. If they want my DNA they're going to have to clean up my crime scene - I'm certainly not going to pay to give it to them. I balked at giving a fingerprint when I got my base pass.

Plus I always think those DNA things are a scam. They could tell you anything and you'd never know. Monello has two sisters who are twins; one of them did a DNA thing and then shared the results with the siblings, figuring they'd all have the same results. I'd have liked to see the other twin do one and see if the results match exactly as they should.
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
The most vexing part of this situation is that the customer paid and agreed that the company could do whatever they wanted with the results.

Why do people do that?
The same reason they allow companies to access all parts of their phones in order to use an app.
The same reason people get fingerprinted to bypass some lines in an airport. (PreCheck)
The same reason people choose to have their iris (biometrics) scanned to bypass the lines in an airport. (Clear)
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
Plus I always think those DNA things are a scam. They could tell you anything and you'd never know. Monello has two sisters who are twins; one of them did a DNA thing and then shared the results with the siblings, figuring they'd all have the same results. I'd have liked to see the other twin do one and see if the results match exactly as they should.
Then there's cases like this where a guy and girl were dating for a year only to find out they are half-siblings (via sperm bank). They found out from 23 and Me.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Then there's cases like this where a guy and girl were dating for a year only to find out they are half-siblings (via sperm bank). They found out from 23 and Me.
Holy cow :lol:

I think they're being a bit emo about it. If they hadn't done the DNA thing, they would never have known and their relationship would run its natural course. It's not like they grew up together fighting over toys and farting on each other, then decided to bang.

We oldsters on here got a nice education when the Cousin Couples people visited us years ago. Turns out that the inbred genetic goof up is largely a myth. Yeah, if you have some disease in your family and you intermarry for generations, it's likely things will start going haywire. But this couple, it's unlikely their children would have genetic abnormalities. And I don't think the legal aspect would be a thing, either, because legally they are not related.
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Finally Found it ......

Ah, I saw that one but dismissed it as your case, since it wasn't him having to prove anything, the state followed a process where got a court order to get Ancestry to look for matches. Based on that, and importantly, some circumstantial stuff like him having ties in the area, they got a search warrant to obtain his sample. They took his sample, compared and within a month he was off the hook. Never arrested, never charged. Hardly a real upending of the guys life.
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
Then there are these 4 people:
Twin brothers Raymon and Richard Miller are the father and uncle to a 3-year-old little girl. The problem is, they don't know which is which. Or who is who.

The identical Missouri twins say they were unknowingly having sex with the same woman. And according to the woman's testimony, she had sex with each man on the same day. Within hours of each other.

When the woman in question, Holly Marie Adams, got pregnant, she named Raymon the father, but he contested and demanded a paternity test, bringing his own brother Richard to court.

But a paternity test in this case could not help. The test showed that both brothers have over a 99.9 percent probability of being the daddy— and neither one wants to pay the child support.
who's yur daddy?
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
They took his sample, compared and within a month he was off the hook. Never arrested, never charged. Hardly a real upending of the guys life.

yeah because sitting around waiting to be arrested is so much fun
 

glhs837

Power with Control
yeah because sitting around waiting to be arrested is so much fun

There is that. It's not fun to be under suspsicion. Much less to spend tens of thousands or your own dollars and lose your freedom while doing so. Point was that as far as the downsides of family DNA searches, this guys case is pretty mild.
 
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