Accurate?

GregV814

Well-Known Member
Yeah but Democrats love abortion.Its in the Bible, ask buttcheck. But democrats don’t believe in the Bible, quite the conundrum.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
Why would teen texting be separated from non-teen (basically everyone is on their damn phone when driving).
How could you accurately track rifle deaths (I thought many gun related homicides don't report specifics of weapon).

Does accidents include Drunk Driving, or are those considered "on purpose" deaths?

Pretty sure privacy laws conflict with reporting of abortions, this has to be a completely made up number (and not every abortion is a murder, even if you believe life begins at conception many abortions are performed when the fetus is non-viable/already dead but the body hasn't naturally progressed with the termination)

Seems like a list that cobbled some wishful thinking with some semi-accurate numbers in order to make a point. The numbers may be correct in a rough order magnitude fashion, but I wouldn't put money on it.
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
This checks, using rough math, with other things I've seen. Can anyone verify the accuracy of this?

View attachment 140653
1. The CDC does not require abortion data to be given to them. It's all voluntary, however, based on the CDC's data (from 49 states) there were approximately 638,169 abortions in 2015 (the most recent study), that equates to 1,748 per day.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30462632

The author seems to be getting different numbers. Perhaps from the Guttmacher Institute that reported approximately 926,200 abortions in 2014 (last year available). That equals about 2,537 per day. Guttmacher states their numbers may be off by +/- 5%.
https://www.guttmacher.org/sites/default/files/factsheet/fb_induced_abortion.pdf

2. CDC says 610,000 heart disease deaths per year, or 1,671 per day on average. Again, the author is off a bit.
https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

3. The National Cancer Institute says that in 2018, about 609,640 people will die of cancer. That's 1,670 average per day. The author is close here.
https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/statistics

4. This study says 5,180 deaths due to "adverse effects of medical treatment" (AEMT). That's about 14 per day on average. Way off, but he's likely using a report from Johns Hopkins that estimates 250,000 to 400,000 deaths per year due to AEMT. There's a link below to a page de-bunking that study if you care to look. Admittedly, I haven't taken the time to go through the study or the de-bunking link in great detail.
The absolute number of deaths in which AEMT was the underlying cause increased from 4180 (95% UI, 3087-4993) in 1990 to 5180 (95% UI, 4469-7436) in 2016.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6484545/
https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/are-medical-errors-really-the-third-most-common-cause-of-death-in-the-u-s-2019-edition/

5. CDC says 169,936 accident deaths per year (not car accidents, btw), or about 466 per day.

6. CDC says 401 per day. Spot on.

7. CDC says about 333 per day. Rounding error, I assume.

8. CDC says 229 per day. Rounding error again.

9. CDC says 153 per day, but that number includes both Flu and Pneumonia.

10. CDC says 129 per day
https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/deaths.htm (Link applied to 5-10)

11. CDC says 130 per day.
https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths.html

12. CDC says 29 per day.
https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/impaired_driving/impaired-drv_factsheet.html

13. CDC says 12 per day.
https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/underage-drinking.htm

14. CDC says 9 per day, but doesn't specify teenagers.
https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving/index.html

15. FBI says 1 per day.
https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2017/crime-in-the-u.s.-2017/topic-pages/tables/table-20

It appears that for things listed in the CDC web site, the numbers are close if not exact. For numbers needing a bit more digging, the numbers were off a bit.
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
It appears that for things listed in the CDC web site, the numbers are close if not exact. For numbers needing a bit more digging, the numbers were off a bit.
Great job, and thank you very much!!

Sounds like "medical errors" was the outlier in terms of what you found verifiable, but I think the legal problems in admitting that, and the definition of what that actually means, will vary from person to person and organization to organization.

Given that the rest of the numbers really seem to be very close (different years looked at? Slightly different data sources, but good ones either way?), it certainly seems that trying to restrict firearm-related deaths is an issue, but off by pretty significant orders of magnitude on what we need to be focusing our "national debate".

Thank you again for looking into that.
 
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