Amazon Prepares To Go On The Offensive Against Newly Unionized Employees

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
“Amazon’s objections are anticipated to be substantial, both in the number of objections and the scope of the conduct to which the Company plans to object,” the company said in the filing.

Amazon alleges the ALU bullied workers into voting for unionization and blames the NLRB for voter suppression. The NLRB reportedly scheduled voting periods that caused long wait times which restricted some to cast a vote, according to The Wall Street Journal.

“None of this is true, and it’s just a tactic for them to delay our certification,” ALU’s vice president of membership Connor Spence told the WSJ, adding that the group expects the labor board to dismiss Amazon’s claims. Amazon has until April 22 to present proof of their allegations for its appeal.



 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

Amazon Abandons Dozens Of Warehouses Before They Even Open



Amazon’s CEO Andy Jassy has developed a strategy to cut an apparent surplus of warehouses and employees from a spending spree during the pandemic, Bloomberg reported, citing data from supply chain consulting firm MWPVL, which closely tracks Amazon’s activities. After a rapid expansion during the pandemic where, for a time, Amazon built a new warehouse almost daily, Amazon has since cancelled, closed or delayed 60 warehouses, and cut 100,000 jobs, Bloomberg reported.

“There remains some serious cutting to do before year-end — in North America and the rest of the world,” said Marc Wulfraat, founder and president of MWPVL, in a statement to Bloomberg. “Having said this, they continue to go live with new facilities this year at an astonishing pace.”

Amazon is joined by other struggling retailers who have been forced to cut earning estimates as inflation remains near record highs. Both consumer spending and the U.S. gross domestic product fell slightly in the second quarter, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Amazon announced this week it intends to close two delivery stations near Baltimore that employ more than 300 people, but stressed that the employees would be able to transfer to other facilities, according to Bloomberg. Typically, Amazon would be either opening new facilities or hiring workers to prepare for the holiday shopping season.

An Amazon spokesperson told Bloomberg it wasn’t unusual for the company to explore multiple locations and change their plans “based on needs across the network.” The spokesperson also told Bloomberg that the Baltimore-area facilities were closing as part of modernization efforts.
 

phreddyp

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
What these union morons haven't figured out yet is how to keep a store or warehouse open when it is easy to close it down because the companies do not have the investment in the site, unlike manufacturing companies such as auto makers, aerospace, shipbuilding etc.
 
Top