Are deputies in St. Mary's really underpaid?

Tech

Well-Known Member
That's base salary. Before OT and shift differentials.

Anyone who thinks working as a Chuck Co deputy is 'rhe same' hasn't been to Waldorf in a while.
As I read the original post, that is the average salary with overtime included. According to the sheriff's website it's $47.6K to start.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
The debate shouldn’t just be about the pay. The public would be outraged if they knew just how few cops are on the street. Yes manpower is a reason for some of that. St. Mary’s has been stuck in 1982 and just can’t get the manpower issue resolved.
My problem isn't with the pay it's the results. And yes I think there needs to be more boots on the ground and less "toys"..
That is a leadership issue and is the fault of the county government.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
Contact the Sheriff and ask if you can spend a week at the academy (deputies spend 6 months) and then do a ride-along on a weekend evening and night. Put your butt on the front line and experience what they go through on a daily basis.
LOL...The Front Line....... The Mean Streets of St Marys Co Maryland......

Pretty good money for just being 21 and have a HS diploma....
 
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officeguy

Well-Known Member
As I read the original post, that is the average salary with overtime included. According to the sheriff's website it's $47.6K to start.
MD Association of counties has St Marys listed as $64,750 for 'actual' with a range $46,446 on the low end and $88,691 for the high end.

That is less than lets say Baltimore County or Montgomery County, but is well competitive with other outlying smaller jurisdictions in the state.

Before starting to raise the salaries, I would try to look at how many deputies have actually moved to Charles and see if you can interview them to see what motivated their move. Maybe its a couple of thousand $$ per year, but maybe its something else, e.g. better opportunities for advancement or the desire NOT to work in the community where they live.
 

General Lee

Well-Known Member
Before starting to raise the salaries, I would try to look at how many deputies have actually moved to Charles and see if you can interview them to see what motivated their move. Maybe its a couple of thousand $$ per year, but maybe its something else, e.g. better opportunities for advancement or the desire NOT to work in the community where they live.
I have heard money is not always the reason for some. Reasons were better opportunities. Better promotion opportunities, better opportunities to move through divisions, more manpower to increase safety and decrease workload. It takes the moon and the stars to align correctly for a promotion to open up in St. Mary's because manpower is Low. Better salaries and opportunities would help attract and retain officers. Divisions are small and openings rarely become available so guys are stuck and get burnt out with no end in sight.
 

officeguy

Well-Known Member
I have heard money is not always the reason for some. Reasons were better opportunities. Better promotion opportunities, better opportunities to move through divisions, more manpower to increase safety and decrease workload. It takes the moon and the stars to align correctly for a promotion to open up in St. Mary's because manpower is Low. Better salaries and opportunities would help attract and retain officers. Divisions are small and openings rarely become available so guys are stuck and get burnt out with no end in sight.
To some extent that's just the nature of the 'industry' that people start out with a smaller agency and move on for better opportunities. If you listened to the personnel guy at the CCSO, he would probably tell you that he loses folks to MDTA police and the feds.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
To some extent that's just the nature of the 'industry' that people start out with a smaller agency and move on for better opportunities. If you listened to the personnel guy at the CCSO, he would probably tell you that he loses folks to MDTA police and the feds.
Yep, we see it multiple time a year in the town I live in. 11 FT LEO's here, and 3-4 are constantly rotating in and out of here.
Most start here as reserve officers and when openings happen they are in front of the line to go full time. Once they have been trained and finished time with the FTO's you know soon they will be moving on... Its the way of that industry among many other's.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Yep, we see it multiple time a year in the town I live in. 11 FT LEO's here, and 3-4 are constantly rotating in and out of here.
Most start here as reserve officers and when openings happen they are in front of the line to go full time. Once they have been trained and finished time with the FTO's you know soon they will be moving on... Its the way of that industry among many other's.
Same in the small town I am from, the dozen police are constantly changing. There are two types one is the person from that town that wants to live and work there all their life and the ones that just graduated police academy and it is their first job.

This is like the military relying on the one and done (three or four years), its cheaper cause they don't have to pay high salaries or a retirement.
 

officeguy

Well-Known Member
Yep, we see it multiple time a year in the town I live in. 11 FT LEO's here, and 3-4 are constantly rotating in and out of here.
Most start here as reserve officers and when openings happen they are in front of the line to go full time. Once they have been trained and finished time with the FTO's you know soon they will be moving on... Its the way of that industry among many other's.
Its a bigger issue in places where you have many small municipal agencies that offer no real opportunities for advancement. This area has mostly county level agencies that are a little better in that regard. The only thing that tends to keep people in one place are agency specific pensions. The St Marys deputies are in a separate pension plan from the rest of the county employees. They may be are able to carry it over to a different agency, but I dont know that.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
Its a bigger issue in places where you have many small municipal agencies that offer no real opportunities for advancement. This area has mostly county level agencies that are a little better in that regard. The only thing that tends to keep people in one place are agency specific pensions. The St Marys deputies are in a separate pension plan from the rest of the county employees. They may be are able to carry it over to a different agency, but I dont know that.
I believe that they start here just under 40 grand, when they are certified they can get hired on say at Indy Metro for 50 grand and at two years bumps to 70 plus overtime. Again not bad for being 21 and a HS diploma.
Every cop I know in Md and Va makes well over 100 grand....
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Every cop I know in Md and Va makes well over 100 grand....
They deserve it. Freaking basketball players and vapid starlets get paid in the millions, and I don't really see their value. Cops, though....and teachers, and garbage guys, and nurses, and all those people who do the dirty jobs that most of us don't want to do - I think THOSE are the people who should be making bank.

I can live without Kylie Jenner but I'd have a tough time getting along without the people mentioned above.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
STEM careers don't have a risk that you'll be dead by the end of the day, nor do they have to clean up after people who sh*t in their car.
What do you think they are in shootouts everyday???? Being a cop isnt even in the top ten most dangerous jobs.
Take away the number that commit suicide and one car driving accidents and that profession drops way down the list.
You dont hear the Agricultural, Iron-workers and the endless other Trades and professions crying on the evenings news about the mean streets and we need to go home every night....
In the world of dangerous jobs, its not that dangerous......
 
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PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
STEM careers don't have a risk that you'll be dead by the end of the day, nor do they have to clean up after people who sh*t in their car.
No but they do require a monetary investment in tuition before starting said job.

How many SMC officers have been killed in the line of duty, or even shot?
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
What do you think they are in shootouts everyday???? Being a cop isnt even in the top ten most dangerous jobs.
Take away the number that commit suicide and one car driving accidents and that profession drops way down the list.
You dont hear the Agricultural, Iron-workers and the endless other Trades and professions crying on the evenings news about the mean streets and we need to go home every night....
In the world of dangerous jobs, its not that dangerous......
Right, but most of those "dangerous jobs" the workers get injured by accidents or their own foolishness. They don't routinely encounter people who are trying to hurt or kill them.

Here are the most dangerous jobs in America:
  1. Logging workers.
  2. Fishers and fishing related workers.
  3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers.
  4. Roofers.
  5. Recycling and trash collectors.
  6. Iron and steel workers.
  7. Truck and sales drivers.
  8. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural workers.
  9. First-line supervisors of construction trades/extraction workers.
  10. Grounds maintenance workers.
Logging industry is the most dangerous job out there, with a high incident rate because people don't pay attention to what they're doing. And even someone who's on the ball, they're relying on the dipshit on their team - one screw up and everyone gets hurt.

Outside sales is considered a dangerous job because they're on the road and get into car accidents.

Let's get real: do you really consider advertising sales a "dangerous job"? Yet transportation accidents make up 40% of workplace fatalities, and advertising sales is absolutely in that mix.

Cops have people actively trying to injure or kill them. The only reason they're not in the top tier of job related death is because they know it's dangerous and they take precautions. Nobody is shooting at the freaking garbage guy (who I love and respect, don't get me wrong) or the guy who works for the Parks Dept. They get injured by their own or someone else's carelessness.

Every cop I know has been intentionally attacked and injured by some dirt bag. Even a former "Officer Friendly" got his ass kicked by a bunch of thugs on what should have been a routine no problem call. Yet I did outside sales for years without incident. And my profession made the "dangerous" cut, while theirs didn't. Go figure.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Well hell why dont you start a logging safety business your "pay attention" advise should go a long way.

Can't believe they didn't figure that out on their own.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Well hell why dont you start a logging safety business your "pay attention" advise should go a long way.

Can't believe they didn't figure that out on their own.
It's amazing that so many people can't seem to drive from point A to point B without smashing into someone or something else, but there it is. "Pay attention" is underrated advice - nobody pays attention to you when you tell them.
 
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