Biden's America

Kyle

Let's Go Brandon!
PREMO Member
If I may ...


Just ask'in and say'in. And since it is everywhere, and in nearly everything we eat, and isn't a natural part of nature, and a man made chemical, I reckon it doesn't really matter, does it? Some of us get lucky not getting sick from it, and some of us don't.
Man, step away from the late night ambulance chasing commercials.

If you listen to them everything causes cancer and everybody needs to sue everybody.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

Man, step away from the late night ambulance chasing commercials.

If you listen to them everything causes cancer and everybody needs to sue everybody.
Fine fine. Okay okay. Geez. Reckon I'll just focus on PFAS contamination then.




I'm sure it's nothing to worry about as well.
 

TPD

the poor dad
If I may ...


Question: Why are you using glyphosate, a known carcinogen that con also be uptaken into any food plant? Aren't there other farming methods that can be utilized? How did the farmers of the past, say just 60-70 years ago, conduct their successful farming operations?


It’s cheap, easy, and it did work. Plus the seed and chemical companies have kind of forced it on us.
 

ProLifePatriot

Well-Known Member
White House Reportedly Asks Energy Companies to Lower Prices


The White House has asked energy companies to help lower fuel prices amid a worldwide rise in energy costs, Reuters reported on Wednesday.
Oil and gas companies have spoken with the White House in the preceding days regarding the request, two sources familiar with the matter told Reuters. One of those sources said the Biden administration has been internally discussing ways to lower fuel costs.
“We are closely monitoring the cost of oil and the cost of gas Americans are paying at the pump,” a White House official said in a comment. “And we are using every tool at our disposal to address anti-competitive practices in U.S. and global energy markets to ensure reliable and stable energy markets.”
However, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said she was “not aware” of reported discussions between energy companies and the White House.
If Brain Dead Biden hadn't killed our pipelines and went back to Opec Nations for our oil, we'd have lower oil and gas costs.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
If I may ...


Question: Why are you using glyphosate, a known carcinogen that con also be uptaken into any food plant? Aren't there other farming methods that can be utilized? How did the farmers of the past, say just 60-70 years ago, conduct their successful farming operations?


I can tell you what farmers did 60 to 70 years ago instead of using Glyphostate.
First they plowed. They didn't just spray the weed and grass and plant without plowing.
They plowed and disked and then planted.
Next they cultivated Instead of spraying they physically used the tractor to cultivate each time the grass and weeds showed up.
In the case of tobacco they hoed got out with a hoe and hoed between the plants to get rid of growth.

Yes, 60 years ago they physically removed the growth by tilling the soil and working their ass off.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Media Blames America ....


America isn't running out of everything just because of a supply-chain crisis. America is running out of everything because Americans are buying so much stuff.


"Spending might have been higher if not for shortages of items consumers are eager to purchase," Jack Kleinhenz, the NRF's chief economist, said in a statement issued on Friday.

Those shortages seem so ubiquitous that the term "everything shortage" is now being used liberally to describe consumers' frustration as they try to get goods of all sorts: paper towels, milk, toys, and more.

Yet claims that the country is running short on everything miss a key point. America has, in fact, imported an immense amount of stuff in the past eight months. And that's part of the reason we're in the midst of an epic supply-chain congestion.


Food shortages are the next supply-chain crunch


In Denver, public-school children are facing shortages of milk. In Chicago, a local market is running short of canned goods and boxed items.
But there’s plenty of food. There just isn’t always enough processing and transportation capacity to meet rising demand as the economy revs up.

More than a year and a half after the pandemic upended daily life, the supply of basic goods at U.S. grocery stores and restaurants is once again falling victim to intermittent shortages and delays.

“I never imagined that we’d be here in October 2021 talking about supply-chain problems, but it’s a reality,” said Vivek Sankaran, chief executive officer of Albertsons Cos., who echoed the laments of other retailers. “Any given day, you’re going to have something missing in our stores, and it’s across categories.”

In Denver, broken parts at the milk supplier’s plant affected shipments of half-pint cartons, on top of disruptions at one time or another in cereal, tortillas and juice.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Gas In One California Town Reaches $7.59 Per Gallon


According to KABC 7 Los Angeles, a gas station in the town of Gorda, California, located along the Big Sur coast, is charging $7.59 per gallon of regular gasoline, and $8.50 for a gallon of premium. The reason? According to WPTV 5, the town, located on Highway 1 in Southern California, has only one gas station, and the nearest gas stations are 40 miles to the North and 12 miles to the South. As such, the station can charge exorbitant prices.

WPTV reports that in July 2019, the town’s lone AmeriCo gas station charged as much as $11.75 per gallon.
 
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GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
White House Forced To Walk Back Biden Claims: Admin ‘Not Pursuing’ Using National Guard As Truckers, Not Changing China Policy


During the town hall, hosted by CNN’s Anderson Cooper, Biden suggested that if supply chain issues persist, he would send in the National Guard to drive trucks from ports where goods are unloaded to retail and big box stores.

“The answer is yes,” Biden said when asked about the possibility of deploying the National Guard to handle supply chain issues. “Absolutely, positively.”

When Cooper suggested that the National Guard could drive trucks, Biden responded positively.

“The answer is yes if we can’t move to increase the number of truckers, which we’re in the process of doing,” he said.
 

herb749

Well-Known Member
White House Forced To Walk Back Biden Claims: Admin ‘Not Pursuing’ Using National Guard As Truckers, Not Changing China Policy


During the town hall, hosted by CNN’s Anderson Cooper, Biden suggested that if supply chain issues persist, he would send in the National Guard to drive trucks from ports where goods are unloaded to retail and big box stores.

“The answer is yes,” Biden said when asked about the possibility of deploying the National Guard to handle supply chain issues. “Absolutely, positively.”

When Cooper suggested that the National Guard could drive trucks, Biden responded positively.

“The answer is yes if we can’t move to increase the number of truckers, which we’re in the process of doing,” he said.

Imagine being called to duty just to drive an 18 wheeler with no experience.
 

UglyBear

Well-Known Member
Imagine being called to duty just to drive an 18 wheeler with no experience.
And... most of the guys qualified to drive 18 wheelers in the Guard drive those as their job.

So... take drivers off the road to put drivers on the road, multiplied by less than 1 government efficiency. Super smart.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
This is how desperate retailers are getting because of the supply chain crisis


The next time you’re at your local grocery store or a nearby location of a department store giant, take a close look at the shelves. If you’ve paid attention at all to news headlines over the past week or so, you’ll no doubt have come across coverage of supply chain issues that are manifesting themselves in part in the form of empty store shelves. But it’s not just empty store shelves resulting from the US supply chain meltdown that includes clogged ports as well as goods sitting unshipped. Retailers are also getting creative (or desperate, depending on who you ask) — to the point that some shoppers say they’ve noticed tactics like stores using single rows of products to fill shelves.

To give the illusion, in other words, of abundance.

People have taken to social media in recent days to share images of this kind of thing, like single rows of chairs arranged bizarrely all along shelves (as you can see below). As if there was nothing else available to put in its place, but the store just wanted to fill the shelves with something. Rather than make it obvious for customers to see that supply chain shortages are having an impact.

And make no mistake. They very much are having an impact.

President Biden’s approval rating in recent weeks has plummeted, as the administration is beset by nettlesome including record-high inflation. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell warned in recent days that supply chain problems and inflation are going to linger well into 2022. Even Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey warned in a tweet on Friday that hyperinflation will hit the US soon. Former McDonald’s USA CEO Ed Rensi told FOX Business on Friday that Biden policies are contributing to all this, while several Biden officials have done their best to downplay the whole thing.

But first, let’s take a look at how this is all playing out in communities around the US.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
I gave up my CDL a few years ago, but maybe I should get it back and go on the road.
Some places are paying a premium for truck drivers.
 
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Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
The next time you’re at your local grocery store or a nearby location of a department store giant, take a close look at the shelves. If you’ve paid attention at all to news headlines over the past week or so, you’ll no doubt have come across coverage of supply chain issues that are manifesting themselves in part in the form of empty store shelves. But it’s not just empty store shelves resulting from the US supply chain meltdown that includes clogged ports as well as goods sitting unshipped. Retailers are also getting creative (or desperate, depending on who you ask) — to the point that some shoppers say they’ve noticed tactics like stores using single rows of products to fill shelves.

To give the illusion, in other words, of abundance.

People have taken to social media in recent days to share images of this kind of thing, like single rows of chairs arranged bizarrely all along shelves (as you can see below). As if there was nothing else available to put in its place, but the store just wanted to fill the shelves with something. Rather than make it obvious for customers to see that supply chain shortages are having an impact.
The author must have read my post last week.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
I find the situation interesting, now that we have labor and supply chain problems all of these leftists are coming out against consumerism

Vox ... The Atlantic ....

From Real Clear Politics ....

160220
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
I gave up my CDL a few years ago, but maybe I should get it back and go on the road.
Some places are paying a premium for truck drivers.
I gave mine up decades ago, plus, I was an 11E20. Now that I'm retired, maybe time to reassess. As long as I don't have to go into any demonrat hell-holes.
 
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