Bow Hunting

FirstGear

New Member
I am new to shooting a bow, initially for target shooting. Now that I feel I can group my arrows in 3-4" circle, I would like to attempt hunting with a bow.

What type of initial equipment I need to do this?

Any suggestion which model tree stand to get. I have several tall oak trees in my back yard, I would like to get a tree stand so I can practice shooting from one. Thank you in advance.
 

struggler44

A Salute to all on Watch
I am new to shooting a bow, initially for target shooting. Now that I feel I can group my arrows in 3-4" circle, I would like to attempt hunting with a bow.

What type of initial equipment I need to do this?

Any suggestion which model tree stand to get. I have several tall oak trees in my back yard, I would like to get a tree stand so I can practice shooting from one. Thank you in advance.
I can kill a deer or buffalo
With just my arrow and my hickory bow
From a hundred yards don't you know
I do it all the time....
 

itsbob

I bowl overhand
3 - 4 inch group at what range?


What kind of sights do you have on your bow?

Finger or release??
 

bulldog

New Member
I am new to shooting a bow, initially for target shooting. Now that I feel I can group my arrows in 3-4" circle, I would like to attempt hunting with a bow.

What type of initial equipment I need to do this?

Any suggestion which model tree stand to get. I have several tall oak trees in my back yard, I would like to get a tree stand so I can practice shooting from one. Thank you in advance.
You "feel" that you can group in 3-4" circle? Either you can, or you can't. No "feeling" about it.

I'm glad that you mentioned practicing from a treestand because this type of shooting (positioning / posture) is different from target shooting on the gound. Good on you for doing the right thing.

There are many treestand companies out there and they will all fit most trees, oak or otherwise, just about the same way. Just like for cars, you'll get "this one is best" arguments from different people. Many people are brand loyal and only theirs will do. Stands vary in features, design and cost so it really depends on what you want in the end. If it's for practice, I'd recommend a ladder stand. A little more difficult to set up, but once done, getting up and down is easier than in a climber and you'll want to practice, A LOT, from a variety of distances.

Other equipment is pretty much a crap shoot. Some folks go in for an afternoon hunt with way more than they need, IMO. I prefer my bow/arrows, a pair of binos and my range finder...which I consider an important piece of gear. Guessing shot distances is tricky at best. A lot of people claim that they can do so accurately, but I call BS.

Not sure where you got your bow/arrows, but if they were not "matched" to each other, I suggest that you have that checked out. Draw length and draw weight need to be matched to arrow weight and spine. Having mis-matched gear can cause problems.

Lastly (unless you ask more questions), practice, practice, practice. When you think you have practiced enough, practice more.

Good luck.
 

FirstGear

New Member
You "feel" that you can group in 3-4" circle? Either you can, or you can't. No "feeling" about it.

I'm glad that you mentioned practicing from a treestand because this type of shooting (positioning / posture) is different from target shooting on the gound. Good on you for doing the right thing.

There are many treestand companies out there and they will all fit most trees, oak or otherwise, just about the same way. Just like for cars, you'll get "this one is best" arguments from different people. Many people are brand loyal and only theirs will do. Stands vary in features, design and cost so it really depends on what you want in the end. If it's for practice, I'd recommend a ladder stand. A little more difficult to set up, but once done, getting up and down is easier than in a climber and you'll want to practice, A LOT, from a variety of distances.

Other equipment is pretty much a crap shoot. Some folks go in for an afternoon hunt with way more than they need, IMO. I prefer my bow/arrows, a pair of binos and my range finder...which I consider an important piece of gear. Guessing shot distances is tricky at best. A lot of people claim that they can do so accurately, but I call BS.

Not sure where you got your bow/arrows, but if they were not "matched" to each other, I suggest that you have that checked out. Draw length and draw weight need to be matched to arrow weight and spine. Having mis-matched gear can cause problems.

Lastly (unless you ask more questions), practice, practice, practice. When you think you have practiced enough, practice more.

Good luck.
A little over 40 yards, I CAN group them at 3-4". Mostly tbhe outside peremeter of the "yellow" circle on the target I got from Wal Mart. I figured the range finder will be a must have tool. Not sure of the make of my Bow/arrows, but got it from the three "J" and they set it up for me draw lenght and weight. I have a release. What are "binos"?
 

bulldog

New Member
A little over 40 yards, I CAN group them at 3-4". Mostly tbhe outside peremeter of the "yellow" circle on the target I got from Wal Mart. I figured the range finder will be a must have tool. Not sure of the make of my Bow/arrows, but got it from the three "J" and they set it up for me draw lenght and weight. I have a release. What are "binos"?
Okay, good. If you got your rig from 3J's, you're set up right. I was going to recommend that you go visit them for a fitting.

A couple more suggestions for you.
- Learn the anatomy of the animal you are going to be hunting. Learn where the kill zone is and practice shooting to that zone. If you don't have a 3-D target, 3J's has a 20-target, 3-D range set up that you can go walk through the woods and practice. Besides shooting from a tree stand, this is probably the best practice you can do.

- Learn about scent control, how to play the wind and use thermals to your advantage. No matter how hard you try, you will never be scent free so you have to rely on the wind to help you out. Know where you expect the animal to come from and position yourself so that the wind works with you, not against you. No matter how good a spot is or how bad you want to hunt it, if the wind is not in your favor, skip that hunt until the wind is your friend. Again, learn about and use thermals to your advantage.

- Learn the land you are going to hunt. Figure out where the animals feed and where they bed. NEVER intrude into or even very close to a bedding area. You may get away with it once, but more than that and you'll blow the animal out of the area and to another one.
 

FirstGear

New Member
Just an update on my latest equipement purchase. Got a stabolizer, new sight, and Bow mounted rangefinder by Bushnell. As I was sighting the new sight, I discovered my string is on its last leg. Getting a new string from a bow shop on friendship school road (forgot the name). But great price and outstabdibg customer service. Busy, hence I was able to get some hunting pointer from the other customer getting their bow refresh.

mounting my new tree stand this week end.
 

AK-74me

"Typical White Person"
practice shooting with the gear you are are gonna hunt with on, shoot from extreme and awkward angles, believe me when your first buck comes in and if you hunt the rut, he will, but he won't come in perfectly you can bet that.

practice some shooting out of your stand, good luck
 

FirstGear

New Member
Have you been keeping it waxed? That helps the string last longer.
Unfortunately not, that was not pointed out as a must for the string. I guess I'll ask about it when I pick up the bow up. Oh yeah, it is Zimmerman Bow Shop. Got to shoot an arrow with 38 bullet on the tip in a special housing today.

Got any suggestion which wax product I can use?
 

ylexot

Super Genius
Any bow string wax. I'm sure there are other waxes that you could use, but any place that has archery equipment (WalMart, Dick's, KMart, etc) should have it. It's a fairly soft wax that will melt slightly and get into the string's fibers as you run your fingers up and down the string. It provides lubrication for the string fibers as they rub against each other when you draw/release.
 

Muller21QQQ

New Member
Just an update on my latest equipement purchase. Got a stabolizer, new sight, and Bow mounted rangefinder by Bushnell. As I was sighting the new sight, I discovered my string is on its last leg. Getting a new string from a bow shop on friendship school road (forgot the name). But great price and outstabdibg customer service. Busy, hence I was able to get some hunting pointer from the other customer getting their bow refresh.

mounting my new tree stand this week end.
Hey guys, thanks for this topic, but I only use the camera when I don't have some kind of laser range finder. However, as far as I know it is best (for example in hunting) to use a rangefinder, because it allows you to see the real distance and focus in the present time. But what do you think of it? After all, there are many substitutes that can help in a situation where it is not possible to use the right device.

The site with the help of which I bought rangefinder: https://www.atncorp.com/range-finder
 
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