Canary Owners

Dixie

New Member
I'm getting one for my dad for his birthday. He's had them off and on his entire life and his grandfather bred them but it's been a long time between birds for him. Any words of wisdom to pass on? I'm going out and looking for supplies today before I actually try and find a bird (that's altogether another issue).
 

Roman

Active Member
I have never had a canary, and don't recall seeing any at any of the pet shops either. I have parrots. A red lored, and a macaw. I do know that canary's can't be around smoke, or drafts, and that males are the singers. I hope your father enjoys his new buddy.
 

Dixie

New Member
I have never had a canary, and don't recall seeing any at any of the pet shops either. I have parrots. A red lored, and a macaw. I do know that canary's can't be around smoke, or drafts, and that males are the singers. I hope your father enjoys his new buddy.
PETCO had one around Christmas so I'm calling all the PETCOs in the Maryland area today/tomorrow as well as the PETSMARTS. I'd really prefer to get one from a private breeder but there are none available right now. From what I'm reading, the hens can sing too (just don't for the most part) and both male and female young birds can sing. In order to get a guaranteed singer you have to purchase an older male that is already singing. I'm pretty psyched over this - been wanting to get him a canary for a long time now. Great timing - I have a week to get everything together including dinner, cleaning the apartment, and getting the toilet fixed. :) Nothing like flying by the seat of your pants! Thanks for the input Roman - I know he's going to like it.
 

Dixie

New Member
I have never had a canary, and don't recall seeing any at any of the pet shops either. I have parrots. A red lored, and a macaw. I do know that canary's can't be around smoke, or drafts, and that males are the singers. I hope your father enjoys his new buddy.
So my father was tickled pink and guess what? It's a male canary and he started trilling and warbling on the second day he was home. It's so cool - wish I could keep him.
 

Roman

Active Member
So my father was tickled pink and guess what? It's a male canary and he started trilling and warbling on the second day he was home. It's so cool - wish I could keep him.
That's great Dixie! The bird knows he has a good home, and is singing because of it. Did your Dad name him yet?
 

Dixie

New Member
That's great Dixie! The bird knows he has a good home, and is singing because of it. Did your Dad name him yet?
Petey, there's was a Petey 1 Petey 2, Petey 3, Petey 4....its' a good thing I was the only girl! He was pretty filled up over receiving the bird - so glad it all came together and bonus - my son fixed my toilet. Thank God for sons that aren't afraid to try.
 

Dixie

New Member
My Peacock is named Petey. Good name! Good for your Son to have helped you out.
You have a peacock? That's so cool - male obviously -is he aggressive? Centuries ago, they had peacocks roaming the streets of Colonial Williamsburg - seemed like I every time I saw the male he was on display.

You know what I don't see or hear anymore? Bobwhites. They used to be all over the place near my parents house in Dameron - haven't heard them in ages. Used to be one of those pleasant summer night sounds. Wonder what happened to them?
 

Roman

Active Member
You have a peacock? That's so cool - male obviously -is he aggressive? Centuries ago, they had peacocks roaming the streets of Colonial Williamsburg - seemed like I every time I saw the male he was on display.

You know what I don't see or hear anymore? Bobwhites. They used to be all over the place near my parents house in Dameron - haven't heard them in ages. Used to be one of those pleasant summer night sounds. Wonder what happened to them?
Petey is a male, and the only time I see that he can be aggressive is when he sees his reflection in something. He's great with the Chickens, and I've noticed that he lets them eat first. Quite the gentleman. How's your Father's Petey doing so far?
 

Blister

Member
You have a peacock? That's so cool - male obviously -is he aggressive? Centuries ago, they had peacocks roaming the streets of Colonial Williamsburg - seemed like I every time I saw the male he was on display.

You know what I don't see or hear anymore? Bobwhites. They used to be all over the place near my parents house in Dameron - haven't heard them in ages. Used to be one of those pleasant summer night sounds. Wonder what happened to them?
Wild Bobwhite quail have all but disappeared from most of Md. as per the Audubon Society

The wild version of the bird is a scarce commodity on the Eastern Shore, where pricey put-and-take shooting of pen-reared quail on private game farms is the norm.

The reason becomes obvious when you drive down any two-lane road in Caroline County. Fields of soybeans, wheat, and corn stretch from the highway shoulder to the horizon with not a brushy fencerow in sight. The desolation is broken only by grain storage bins and white chicken houses, each as long as a football field and filled with thousands of broilers destined for the Perdue plant farther down the Delmarva Peninsula. In essence, most of Maryland’s wild quail coveys, along with songbirds that also depend on native grasslands and what scientists call “early successional habitat”—herbaceous annual and perennial plants—have been traded for shrink-wrapped quarters, breasts, and legs.

Indeed, the once-ubiquitous northern bobwhite, the best known of North America’s six native quail species, is in deep trouble across its Southeast stronghold. From the Chesapeake shore to the oak savannas of Texas, quail counts have been in free fall since the annual Breeding Bird Survey was launched in 1966. Maryland’s bobwhite population, for example, has plunged 90 percent. No wonder, then, that this game bird recently landed at the very top of National Audubon’s Common Birds in Decline report, which estimates the national population plunge at 82 percent over the past 41 years.

http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/birds/birds0903.html
 

Dixie

New Member
Wild Bobwhite quail have all but disappeared from most of Md. as per the Audubon Society

The wild version of the bird is a scarce commodity on the Eastern Shore, where pricey put-and-take shooting of pen-reared quail on private game farms is the norm.

The reason becomes obvious when you drive down any two-lane road in Caroline County. Fields of soybeans, wheat, and corn stretch from the highway shoulder to the horizon with not a brushy fencerow in sight. The desolation is broken only by grain storage bins and white chicken houses, each as long as a football field and filled with thousands of broilers destined for the Perdue plant farther down the Delmarva Peninsula. In essence, most of Maryland’s wild quail coveys, along with songbirds that also depend on native grasslands and what scientists call “early successional habitat”—herbaceous annual and perennial plants—have been traded for shrink-wrapped quarters, breasts, and legs.

Indeed, the once-ubiquitous northern bobwhite, the best known of North America’s six native quail species, is in deep trouble across its Southeast stronghold. From the Chesapeake shore to the oak savannas of Texas, quail counts have been in free fall since the annual Breeding Bird Survey was launched in 1966. Maryland’s bobwhite population, for example, has plunged 90 percent. No wonder, then, that this game bird recently landed at the very top of National Audubon’s Common Birds in Decline report, which estimates the national population plunge at 82 percent over the past 41 years.

http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/birds/birds0903.html
Thanks. I read something similar to that after I posted. It's really too bad - that's a pleasant sound that I remember from nearly every place I've ever lived. My parents had chickens and I distinctly remember a quail with little ones trailing behind her in their yard. Cute as buttons.
 

Dixie

New Member
Petey is a male, and the only time I see that he can be aggressive is when he sees his reflection in something. He's great with the Chickens, and I've noticed that he lets them eat first. Quite the gentleman. How's your Father's Petey doing so far?
I was over there on Tuesday and he was trilling up a storm. I really want one for myself now! Does your Petey display a lot? Display - is that the right word?
 

Roman

Active Member
Petey is very proud of his beautiful butt feathers, and displays them frequently. He shakes them too, making a ruffling sound. He showed up here near 4 years ago as a baby. He didn't have his fancy tail yet. He came with two pea hens, but they disappeared. Petey stayed, and lives with our chickens. Life is short Dixie, get yourself a Canary, and enjoy him.
 

Airgasm

Well-Known Member
Petey is very proud of his beautiful butt feathers, and displays them frequently. He shakes them too, making a ruffling sound.
Typical Male...

Canaries are cool BTW :yay:

sorry for the highjack, couldn't help me-self...
 
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