Christmas Spread

twinoaks207

Summer!!!!
Rib Roast and Yorkshire pudding. :drool: Always the same at my Mom's home and no complaints. I again get to make my lumpy mashed just like Thanksgiving.

My Gammie's Christmas was leg of lamb stuffed with garlic and seasoned well, roasted taters and carrots, and my favorite: roasted asparagus served on buttered toast points.

I do love lamb and will buy it when I find it on sale.

Speaking of which, how did you do the mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving?

Daugher #2 insists on ham and "cheesy potatoes". I've only done 1 turkey this year (normally do 2), so we're having turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, cheese potatoes, ham, fresh green beans, corn (frozen from Farmer's market), crab-stuffed mushroom caps, and maybe a fruit salad. Still looking for something "new" to add to the mix...

I used to try to do crabcakes for Christmas Eve dinner but this year I think we might do take-out Chinese, just to be different!
 

Wenchy

Hot Flash
Speaking of which, how did you do the mashed potatoes for Thanksgiving?

I added two small containers of cream cheese and chives, kept the whole stick of butter and cream. Heart attack on a plate and everyone was pleased. I hand mash them so they are still a bit lumpy. The addition to the 'taters still went well with the gravy.

I enjoy the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners too much to get carryout Chinese.

Could be fun in certain situations but I want the traditional fare and all the unique items people bring.

If you saw my sister's spread you would faint.

I pass out after I have to clean all the crap up and box it up for everybody. :lmao:

Time to train the kids.
 

twinoaks207

Summer!!!!
I added two small containers of cream cheese and chives, kept the whole stick of butter and cream. Heart attack on a plate and everyone was pleased. I hand mash them so they are still a bit lumpy. The addition to the 'taters still went well with the gravy.

I enjoy the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners too much to get carryout Chinese.

Could be fun in certain situations but I want the traditional fare and all the unique items people bring.

If you saw my sister's spread you would faint.

I pass out after I have to clean all the crap up and box it up for everybody. :lmao:

Time to train the kids.

Those taters sound good -- might have to try that. I could never do take-out for a Thanksgiving or Christmas Day meal -- we like our leftovers too much! I'm thinking of doing it for Christmas Eve because just once, I'd like to just sit around and enjoy that day -- the decorations, the anticipatory mood, maybe watch a few Christmas movies and enjoy being around my family. Normally, I run around like crazy, wrapping presents, running out for last minute stocking stuffers, cooking something "fancy" for dinner -- just generally being "the Christmas elf from Hell" (as I am fondly referred to by Mr. Twin). Actually, take-out Chinese is sounding better & better. Then I can focus all of my cooking efforts on the "big day"...now I need to go investigate my cookbooks to find something AWESOME to add to the dinner menu....

:walkingawayinmyjinglebellsocks:
 

my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
Brunch at my house Spiral Ham, Sausage Gravy & Biscuits, Venison Loin Medallions fried in butter, Omlets, Fresh Fruit, Juices, Hot Cider, Cranberry Bread, Cinnamon Rolls, Rum Cake, Chocolates

Dinner at Mom's Prime Rib, Smoked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Sausage Dressing, Broccoli, Green Beans, Carrotts, Cranberry Relish, Rolls, Fresh Apple Cake, Pumpkin Rolls, Chocolate Cheesecake

Feeding 25 or so at each meal. It's all about the food - Gonna be FUN!!!
 

Wenchy

Hot Flash
Those taters sound good -- might have to try that. I could never do take-out for a Thanksgiving or Christmas Day meal -- we like our leftovers too much! I'm thinking of doing it for Christmas Eve because just once, I'd like to just sit around and enjoy that day -- the decorations, the anticipatory mood, maybe watch a few Christmas movies and enjoy being around my family. Normally, I run around like crazy, wrapping presents, running out for last minute stocking stuffers, cooking something "fancy" for dinner -- just generally being "the Christmas elf from Hell" (as I am fondly referred to by Mr. Twin). Actually, take-out Chinese is sounding better & better. Then I can focus all of my cooking efforts on the "big day"...now I need to go investigate my cookbooks to find something AWESOME to add to the dinner menu....

:walkingawayinmyjinglebellsocks:

I misunderstood your original posting. Christmas Eve Dinner? We raid my Mom's fridge and then I head to the basement to wrap all the stocking stuffers. This year I will have both of my children to help.

Chinese carryout would be a grand change to the leftovers (in my Mother's fridge, some dating back to Thanksgiving) :lol:

THEN we have to watch the same movies we watch every year. I love it.

If we could take the "Gift" part of Christmas out I would enjoy it as much as Thanksgiving.
 

BadGirl

I am so very blessed
Brunch at my house Spiral Ham, Sausage Gravy & Biscuits, Venison Loin Medallions fried in butter, Omlets, Fresh Fruit, Juices, Hot Cider, Cranberry Bread, Cinnamon Rolls, Rum Cake, Chocolates

Dinner at Mom's Prime Rib, Smoked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Sausage Dressing, Broccoli, Green Beans, Carrotts, Cranberry Relish, Rolls, Fresh Apple Cake, Pumpkin Rolls, Chocolate Cheesecake

Feeding 25 or so at each meal. It's all about the food - Gonna be FUN!!!
If I wasn't hanging out with my family, I'd want to hang out with you and yours. Your spread sounds awesome!
 

nachomama

All Up In Your Grill
Brunch at my house Spiral Ham, Sausage Gravy & Biscuits, Venison Loin Medallions fried in butter, Omlets, Fresh Fruit, Juices, Hot Cider, Cranberry Bread, Cinnamon Rolls, Rum Cake, Chocolates

Dinner at Mom's Prime Rib, Smoked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Sausage Dressing, Broccoli, Green Beans, Carrotts, Cranberry Relish, Rolls, Fresh Apple Cake, Pumpkin Rolls, Chocolate Cheesecake

Feeding 25 or so at each meal. It's all about the food - Gonna be FUN!!!


YUM!!!!!
 

BadGirl

I am so very blessed
So what's on your menus, BG? You always come up with an impeccable spread. :drool:
Ironically, I haven't given it too much thought.

I'm in the mindset lately that I'm not going to stress out over anything.

But now that the time is quickly approaching, I think I'll try my hand at a Shabu Shabu. The name Shabu Shabu is derived from the "swish swish" sound of cooking the meat in the pot. The dish is related to sukiyaki in style, in that both use thinly sliced meat and vegetables and are usually served with dipping sauces, but it is considered to be more savory and less sweet than sukiyaki. It is considered a winter dish but is eaten year-round.

The dish is traditionally made with thinly sliced beef, though modern preparations sometimes use pork, crab, chicken, duck, or lobster. Most often, tender ribeye steak is used, but less tender cuts such as top sirloin are also common. A more expensive meat, such as wagyū, may also be used for its enhanced flavor and texture. It is usually served with tofu and vegetables, including Chinese cabbage, chrysanthemum leaves, nori (edible seaweed), onions, carrots, shiitake mushrooms and enokitake mushrooms. In some places, udon, mochi or harusame noodles may also be served.

The dish is prepared by submerging a very thin slice of meat or a piece of vegetable in a pot of boiling flavorful broth and swishing it back and forth several times. The familiar swishing sound is where the dish gets its name. Shabu-shabu directly translates to "swish-swish". Cooked meat and vegetables are usually dipped in ponzu or "goma" (sesame seed) sauce before eating, and served with a bowl of steamed white rice. Once the meat and vegetables have been eaten, leftover broth from the pot is customarily combined with the remaining rice, and the resulting soup is usually eaten last.

I picked up a great commercial-grade fondue set last year, and I'll use it to make this. Or maybe I'll just make some Melting Pot fondue.

I'l like to rev it up a bit and get out of the traditional holiday food fare.
 

lovinmaryland

Well-Known Member
Ironically, I haven't given it too much thought.

I'm in the mindset lately that I'm not going to stress out over anything.

But now that the time is quickly approaching, I think I'll try my hand at a Shabu Shabu. The name Shabu Shabu is derived from the "swish swish" sound of cooking the meat in the pot. The dish is related to sukiyaki in style, in that both use thinly sliced meat and vegetables and are usually served with dipping sauces, but it is considered to be more savory and less sweet than sukiyaki. It is considered a winter dish but is eaten year-round.

The dish is traditionally made with thinly sliced beef, though modern preparations sometimes use pork, crab, chicken, duck, or lobster. Most often, tender ribeye steak is used, but less tender cuts such as top sirloin are also common. A more expensive meat, such as wagyū, may also be used for its enhanced flavor and texture. It is usually served with tofu and vegetables, including Chinese cabbage, chrysanthemum leaves, nori (edible seaweed), onions, carrots, shiitake mushrooms and enokitake mushrooms. In some places, udon, mochi or harusame noodles may also be served.

The dish is prepared by submerging a very thin slice of meat or a piece of vegetable in a pot of boiling flavorful broth and swishing it back and forth several times. The familiar swishing sound is where the dish gets its name. Shabu-shabu directly translates to "swish-swish". Cooked meat and vegetables are usually dipped in ponzu or "goma" (sesame seed) sauce before eating, and served with a bowl of steamed white rice. Once the meat and vegetables have been eaten, leftover broth from the pot is customarily combined with the remaining rice, and the resulting soup is usually eaten last.

I picked up a great commercial-grade fondue set last year, and I'll use it to make this. Or maybe I'll just make some Melting Pot fondue.

I'l like to rev it up a bit and get out of the traditional holiday food fare.
That sounds really neat! Would that be for your entire family or just you guys?

I am leery about trying new recipes when I have guest over so I normally stick w/ the old stand by.
Yep! I do the grilling -- not hubby. He's not allowed to touch the grill. :lol:

:high5: Same thing at my house. He just cant help but over cook stuff, even when he tries his hardest not too :lol:
 

BadGirl

I am so very blessed
That sounds really neat! Would that be for your entire family or just you guys?

I am leery about trying new recipes when I have guest over so I normally stick w/ the old stand by.

I'm not sure who will be over for Christmas. In years past, I always had the Christmas feed-on at my house, but this year my sister and I traded Thanksgiving for Christmas, so she has the big shabang this time around.

So, the shabu shabu/fondue thing will be for nine of us, I think.


Oh, and I have absolutely no problem trying out new recipes for the first time on guests. I can't hardly thing of a time where I didn't do that. My risks always seem to turn out great. :lol:
 

lovinmaryland

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure who will be over for Christmas. In years past, I always had the Christmas feed-on at my house, but this year my sister and I traded Thanksgiving for Christmas, so she has the big shabang this time around.

So, the shabu shabu/fondue thing will be for nine of us, I think.


Oh, and I have absolutely no problem trying out new recipes for the first time on guests. I can't hardly thing of a time where I didn't do that. My risks always seem to turn out great. :lol:

You know other than barefoot contessa most recipes I get always need a little tweaking. I always follow them to the T first go around and then fix as needed.

Let me know how it turns out. It sounds like it will be very unique and memorable Christmas meal :yay:
 
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