Coming Red Wave 2022

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
As was I, but Truman-Kennedy classic, pragmatic Liberals, respectful of the Constitution, not neo-Progz.
My family has not voted for a Dem for federal office since JFK.
There was a guy on FOX today - can't remember, House oe Senate but he was a Democrat, and was asked why he was, STILL.
And part of it was based on - the past. Yeah, grew up Democrat, lived in an environment where the Dems were in charge and the GOP non-existent, so everything good the government did was lain at the feet of the Democratic Party

He stayed with them, out of loyalty. And it was obvious he was unwilling to criticize the party or the President - specifically - but had little trouble criticizing it as a whole.

If the GOP has any wish to prosper in the years to come, it has to get through to people like him - as in, leave the Dems they are NOT doing you any good, any longer.
 

CPUSA

Well-Known Member
Face it. It is MUCH more difficult for young people to strike out on their own and "make it." Mounds of data to prove this. Thus, they want to have someone to take care of them because "life-ing is hard." Meanwhile those who have already succeeded and found their way in life (older generation) are what makes up the Repub base.
Name a time in history when this WASN'T the case?
And it looks to me like there are MANY more millionaires younger than me these days...
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
Face it. It is MUCH more difficult for young people to strike out on their own and "make it." Mounds of data to prove this. Thus, they want to have someone to take care of them because "life-ing is hard." Meanwhile those who have already succeeded and found their way in life (older generation) are what makes up the Repub base.
You’re going to have provide some of that data because to me this looks like the easiest time for anyone to be able to make it. Jobs are there for the taking and if you don’t like that one you can quit and be employed by the end of the week. Inflation is admittedly high, but interest rates are still very low making home buying fairly easy. More and more jobs are coming with benefits that include paying for education, so a degree is essentially just you committing yourself to it.
 

UglyBear

Well-Known Member
You’re going to have provide some of that data because to me this looks like the easiest time for anyone to be able to make it. Jobs are there for the taking and if you don’t like that one you can quit and be employed by the end of the week. Inflation is admittedly high, but interest rates are still very low making home buying fairly easy. More and more jobs are coming with benefits that include paying for education, so a degree is essentially just you committing yourself to it.
Totally agree with you.
The “good old time” people “remember” is when you went out in to the middle of the forest, cleared land by hand, built a cabin and sheds. That sounds really really hard.

Nowadays, with the Baby Boomers retiring en masse, there are millions of trade jobs that one can grow into your own business. Or the tech sector, where all you need is a laptop. All with much better safety nets and success rate than getting on the ole’ Oregon Trail.
 

Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
there are millions of trade jobs that one can grow into your own business.
There was a re-run of This Old House on today, and even a few years ago they were lamenting that there was no one of the younger generation that wanted to do trade work, even tho it's one of the best paying jobs there is. They had internships where the TOH contractors actively pursued trying to get young people in to learn the trade. Turnout wasn't good.
 
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vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Face it. It is MUCH more difficult for young people to strike out on their own and "make it." Mounds of data to prove this. Thus, they want to have someone to take care of them because "life-ing is hard." Meanwhile those who have already succeeded and found their way in life (older generation) are what makes up the Repub base.

It's a matter of mindset and how they were raised. I'm seeing many of my friends' young adult offspring setting out and making it just fine. Several of them straight out of high school, no college needed.

But they expect to work and earn it, not just have it handed to them while they're texting with their friends or playing games on their phone. That's what gives them a leg up over their peers who've been coddled and spoiled. If data show it's harder for young people to strike out on their own it's because we're seeing the results of two-plus decades of helicopter parenting being a trend, not any real change in how the world works.
 

black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
Not to mention the benefits and retirement packages if you're a Union member.
The GM Stamping plant in Marion,IN has many openings in the electricial and mold journeymen apprentice program. Starts at $26.00 an hour, Vertually no young folks applys.
They have started to bring back the sixty and older retired crowd, pay averages $90-$120 thousand.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

Abortion Will Not Be The Decisive Issue In The Midterms



Democrats are electorally giddy about the U.S. Supreme Court likely overturning the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. Sure liberals don’t like the policy prospect, but now they believe at least their slumping November prospects have snapped back into high gear.

But they’re wrong. While abortion may be an important issue in the midterms for some voters, economic issues like gas prices and inflation are going to be the decisive factors. That’s because the abortion-motivated voters were already planning to come out for Democrats.

Just 37% of Americans approve of Biden’s handling of the economy, according to the RealClearPolitics average of polls, a terrible harbinger for Democrats. Electoral architect James Carville rightfully noted for Bill Clinton that “it’s the economy, stupid.”

“It might be a little messy for some people, but abortion is not going away,” Republican Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson told The Wall Street Journal’s Siobhan Hughes and Eliza Collins. “I just don’t think this is going to be the big political issue everybody thinks it is, because it’s not going to be that big a change.”
 

OccamsRazor

Well-Known Member
Name a time in history when this WASN'T the case?
And it looks to me like there are MANY more millionaires younger than me these days...
A time in history? Like the time when a single-income family could afford to own a decent home, car(s), go on vacation yearly, and send kids to college? Those times?? Like possibly the 1950s through the late 1970s?
You’re going to have provide some of that data because to me this looks like the easiest time for anyone to be able to make it. Jobs are there for the taking and if you don’t like that one you can quit and be employed by the end of the week. Inflation is admittedly high, but interest rates are still very low making home buying fairly easy. More and more jobs are coming with benefits that include paying for education, so a degree is essentially just you committing yourself to it.
Are you actually trying to say that the cost of living NOW is easier and even lower than it has been in the past? Do you really need me to dig up data on something that is general knowledge?
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
Before the war, women stayed home and families lived off one salary.
Today most families have Mom and Dad working and kids being raised by baby sitters and taught how to bunghole in schools.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
A time in history? Like the time when a single-income family could afford to own a decent home, car(s), go on vacation yearly, and send kids to college? Those times?? Like possibly the 1950s through the late 1970s?

Are you actually trying to say that the cost of living NOW is easier and even lower than it has been in the past? Do you really need me to dig up data on something that is general knowledge?
apparently you have a reading problem or would rather argue your own points rather than the ones I made. I never said that the cost of living was low, I said that there are so many open jobs available that you are able to move up to the position you want. When I was new to the job market the unemployment rate was more than 10%, what does the cost of living matter when you're unemployed? So yes, it is one of the easiest times to make it.
 

OccamsRazor

Well-Known Member
apparently you have a reading problem or would rather argue your own points rather than the ones I made. I never said that the cost of living was low, I said that there are so many open jobs available that you are able to move up to the position you want. When I was new to the job market the unemployment rate was more than 10%, what does the cost of living matter when you're unemployed? So yes, it is one of the easiest times to make it.
I mentioned the cost of living because it has the MOST impact on our discussion. How does "making it" matter when the cost of living out paces the level which you attain professionally? You seem to be arguing a point of employed vs. unemployed when my point is that even being employed does not mean you are "making it." Especially in this economy.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

White House Looks to Be Planning for 'Wave of Infection,' Just in Time for Midterms, Advises Indoor Masking







Another takeaway from Dr. Jha's appearance on the program, and from the report, is a potential return to indoor masking. Emphasis is added:

Dr. Rochelle P. Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that the seven-day average of hospital admissions from Covid rose 19 percent over the previous week. About 3,000 people a day were being admitted with Covid, she said, although death rates, a lagging indicator, remained low.
More than 32 percent of Americans now live in counties with medium to high levels of virus transmission, compared with about 24 percent the previous week. Dr. Walensky said that local leaders and individuals in those regions should adopt — or at least consider — prevention strategies, such as masking in indoor public settings and more frequent testing.


Raddatz and Dr. Jha made reference to New York City Mayor Eric Adams, who refrained from re-imposing an indoor mask mandate, though he did say they are "urging New Yorkers, while you're in indoors, in large settings, social settings, wear your masks."
 
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