Depression

MADPEBS1

Man, I'm still here !!!
LL just don't reply, we know your opinion, don't care!

I know this isn't probably the place for this but depression is bad, This is an example of someone who hid their depression and killed themselves next day.

WATCH YOUR FAMILIES, love and listen to them !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

https://www.yahoo.com/music/chester-bennington-apos-widow-apos-150736430.html

His widow is really doing a great job and showing how life can look great and then it's GONE !
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
Do a little research on untreated depression.
Why does it go untreated?
Lack of qualified physicians and counselors.
The stigma attached to any mental health disorder.
To list just two. Truth is most people think it's made up, "just snap out of it". It's not that simple. Clinical depression is a medical problem, it's not fiction or fantasy. True, we all go through periods of being depressed. Our moods swing, and sooner than later we are feeling ok again. For those with depression, their body doesn't produce the chemical that does that.
Hence why they are given a medical diagnosis.

A few excerpts from WebMD

Untreated clinical depression is a serious problem. Untreated depression increases the chance of risky behaviors such as drug or alcohol addiction. It also can ruin relationships, cause problems at work, and make it difficult to overcome serious illnesses.

Clinical depression, also known as major depression, is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. Clinical depression affects the way you eat and sleep. It affects the way you feel about yourself and those around you. It even affects your thoughts.

People who are depressed cannot simply “pull themselves together” and be cured. Without proper treatment, including antidepressants and/or psychotherapy, untreated clinical depression can last for weeks, months, or years. Appropriate treatment, however, can help most people with depression.

How does untreated clinical depression affect physical health?

There is mounting evidence that clinical depression takes a serious toll on physical health. The most recent studies exploring health and major depression have looked at patients with stroke or coronary artery disease. Results have shown that people with major depression who are recovering from strokes or heart attacks have a more difficult time making health care choices. They also find it more difficult to follow their doctor's instructions and to cope with the challenges their illness presents. Another study found that patients with major depression have a higher risk of death in the first few months after a heart attack.
How is sleep disrupted by untreated depression?

One of the most telling symptoms of clinical depression is a change in sleep patterns. Though the most common problem is insomnia (difficulty getting adequate sleep), people sometimes feel an increased need for sleep and experience excessive energy loss. Lack of sleep can cause some of the same symptoms as depression -- extreme tiredness, loss of energy, and difficulty concentrating or making decisions.

In addition, untreated depression may result in weight gain or loss, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and irritability. Treating the depression helps the person get control over all of these depression symptoms.

What are common signs of insomnia with untreated depression?

Common signs of insomnia include:

Daytime fatigue
Irritability and difficulty concentrating
Sleep that never feels like "enough"
Trouble falling asleep
Trouble going back to sleep after waking up during the night
Waking up at all hours of the night
Waking up before the alarm clock goes off
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
A trigger for depression can be a traumatic injury to the body, such as the abdominal surgery I had for pancreatic cancer.

The abdomen has as many neurons as the brain and the Whipple procedure has been characterized to me as similar to a traumatic brain injury in its effect on the nervous system.

I've been treated in the past for clinical depression, so I watch for the signs and know I've been mildly depressed.
I cope better than some, mainly because I quite boozing when I felt something was going wrong with my body in March 2015.
Alcohol is a depressant drug and only made things worse in the past.

Part of what helps me is being able to work part time, gets me out of the house and around other people.
Another part is knowing I am very fortunate in my early diagnosis, treatment, and the way I have healed.
 

MADPEBS1

Man, I'm still here !!!
A trigger for depression can be a traumatic injury to the body, such as the abdominal surgery I had for pancreatic cancer.

The abdomen has as many neurons as the brain and the Whipple procedure has been characterized to me as similar to a traumatic brain injury in its effect on the nervous system.

I've been treated in the past for clinical depression, so I watch for the signs and know I've been mildly depressed.
I cope better than some, mainly because I quite boozing when I felt something was going wrong with my body in March 2015.
Alcohol is a depressant drug and only made things worse in the past.

Part of what helps me is being able to work part time, gets me out of the house and around other people.
Another part is knowing I am very fortunate in my early diagnosis, treatment, and the way I have healed.
Glad you are feeling better.... ALways talk, never be afraid to talk.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
A trigger for depression can be a traumatic injury to the body, such as the abdominal surgery I had for pancreatic cancer.

The abdomen has as many neurons as the brain and the Whipple procedure has been characterized to me as similar to a traumatic brain injury in its effect on the nervous system.

I've been treated in the past for clinical depression, so I watch for the signs and know I've been mildly depressed.
I cope better than some, mainly because I quite boozing when I felt something was going wrong with my body in March 2015.
Alcohol is a depressant drug and only made things worse in the past.

Part of what helps me is being able to work part time, gets me out of the house and around other people.
Another part is knowing I am very fortunate in my early diagnosis, treatment, and the way I have healed.
Can you self recognize depression or do you need someone external to tell you you're depressed? I know you said you watch for signs, but I'm talking about the first time. I've had a lot of the symptoms for years like insomnia, hunger and fatigue, but I've never felt "depressed".
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
Can you self recognize depression or do you need someone external to tell you you're depressed? I know you said you watch for signs, but I'm talking about the first time. I've had a lot of the symptoms for years like insomnia, hunger and fatigue, but I've never felt "depressed".
For me, it's creative procrastination (playing a lot of solitaire on the computer) instead of doing needed things around the house, sleeping a lot more than average, even when I've slept, lack of energy, lessened interest in doing things I like to do...

I've found you don't need to have "the blues" in order to be depressed.

As was pointed out, it is a medical condition, treatable through a combination of medication and counseling.

One hazard of the antidepressants, your body does become dependent and you have to wean off. It took my wife 6 months once her doctor determined she was healing from PTSD and other effects of her service connected disabilities.

I was not on meds long enough back when to become dependent, talk therapy worked well for me.
 
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