Government is getting a 2019 pay raise

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Hoo-frickin'-ray.

I know that feds seem to be everyone's favorite whipping boy - but aside from ridiculous comparisons and outrageous estimations of benefits and salaries - pay raises for federal employees is far less than your average American has received -

Since 2008 - 2.5, 2.9, then 1.5 for each year after that.
Then in years 2011, 12 and 13 - zero.
Then the next four years - 1%.
Last year - 1.4%. Until Friday, we were once again going to get a zero.

I really get weary of being told my job isn't worth anything to taxpayers. I daresay the arguments given could easily be said about most people's jobs - so that argument I ignore.

But here's the thing about the raise - do you know what the average American worker's pay increase has been over the last ten, twenty years?
For most people it hovers between 2.9% to 3.1% this century. That's typical. For federal workers, not so much.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Hoo-frickin'-ray.

I know that feds seem to be everyone's favorite whipping boy - but aside from ridiculous comparisons and outrageous estimations of benefits and salaries - pay raises for federal employees is far less than your average American has received -

Since 2008 - 2.5, 2.9, then 1.5 for each year after that.
Then in years 2011, 12 and 13 - zero.
Then the next four years - 1%.
Last year - 1.4%. Until Friday, we were once again going to get a zero.

I really get weary of being told my job isn't worth anything to taxpayers. I daresay the arguments given could easily be said about most people's jobs - so that argument I ignore.

But here's the thing about the raise - do you know what the average American worker's pay increase has been over the last ten, twenty years?
For most people it hovers between 2.9% to 3.1% this century. That's typical. For federal workers, not so much.
To be fair most people in the private sector do not get an across the board raise, they get what government people get as steps or performance increases.

Even in those years where there were no across the board raises anyone in the performance based pay system could get a raise, mine averaged around 2% a year during those years.

Last year I got a promotion and there is a soft rule that if you are promoted in the year you don't get a performance raise that year, but I will still get the across the board raise. So it is a pretty fair deal, not great but not bad.

I do agree with all the hate from some, we have had quite a few people from the private sector come in to work and they think it will be a cakewalk and they end up running away crying about the stress and how much they get beat on by the demands of the job.
 
To be fair most people in the private sector do not get an across the board raise, they get what government people get as steps or performance increases.
When I was a contractor, our raises were closely linked to govt raises. For quite a few years, 1.5% was considered terrific (by management, not the workers...).
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
When I was a contractor, our raises were closely linked to govt raises. For quite a few years, 1.5% was considered terrific (by management, not the workers...).
Was that in addition to some sort of step and/or performance increase?
 

Grumpy

Well-Known Member
When I was a contractor, our raises were closely linked to govt raises. For quite a few years, 1.5% was considered terrific (by management, not the workers...).
:yeahthat: 10 years ago we were using yearly labor escalation of 3% in proposals, dropped to 1.5% 9 years ago and has been there ever since.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Nope. That was the entire raise. And that was if you were a good performer. Lower end raises were in the .5-1% range.
Reason why I think government employees get a pretty decent deal.

My dad only got a raise every 3-5 years when their contract was renegotiated, everyone that did his job got paid the same no matter what. The people that did it better than the others got offered the OT.

Overall I am pretty happy with how the government treats its employees, the implementation of the pay for performance systems is another story though.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Reason why I think government employees get a pretty decent deal.
I've done both - worked for the government - gone to private industry - gone back to government.
My dad did the same, although all things being the same, he would have loved to stay in the Navy for life.
As it happens, he worked almost forty years for them as a civilian after working as an engineer for almost
twenty in private employ.

There are definite advantages to government - but for most people I know, two things stick out -
job security and benefits. I've worked for firms that went out of business - and that's not happening
to the government. I've seen people get fired for completely capricious and vindictive reasons - that
mostly can't happen in government. Knowing you'll have your job and your benefits are safe is a strong
pull - even if - as I maintain - it doesn't pay as well over the long haul. It's the difference between investing
in safe stocks - and volatile ones.

There are DEFINITELY advantages to private industry as well, which I noticed - if the boss wants to promote
you - he can do that whenever he wants (usually). In fact, private firms often grow - once in my twenties
I was offered to be the head manager at a new-to-be formed office (I turned them down). They just wanted
me. At the government, it would usually have to be screened through HR and a short list provided to the
one offering the position that has been properly vetted - and it MIGHT include you. In private industry,
they have a vested interest in having the best tools, the best software, the best equipment - because they
compete with others. In government, it's not uncommon - and fairly typical - to go to work in ancient
office buildings with antiquated facilities using old computers and old technology. At my own place, we
"upgraded" to Windows XP around 2011, and to Windows 7 around 2015. I think we currently use Office
2013. In private employ, you might gain from profit-sharing. When I worked for a private company,
the training budget was endless, and I believe our health care was paid for outright - but I didn't get to
choose. You could get a bonus for just about any reason - in my current agency - well, nobody really
gets those anymore, and when they had them, they were a joke.

For me - one of the "enemies" of merit increases is - the union. The union is responsible for a lot of things
that they claim, but they are also responsible for making sure hardly anyone gets a big bonus for exceptional
work. While I applaud Trump's idea that good workers should get increases based on merit - it's an idea
going around for at least thirty years, and it just doesn't happen - too many people want to stop it.
When I was in private industry - I wasn't aware that your "yearly review" was when you got your raise.
Because in government, they're all automatic and big increases come as a result of a great performance
review.

That's good right? Well what if your boss is told, sorry, we can only have one "excellent" review in your
section - that's from the top management. "But everyone put in incredible work!" he says. Doesn't matter -
so performance reviews are VERY often "rationed". If the boss says NO high reviews - your work doesn't
mean squat.

PART of the reason I stay in government employ is - the retirement. It used to be in my Dad's generation
that a pension from your company had value - nowadays, you're lucky if you ever see it at all. Mine will
be so meager, I'm not sure I will live long enough to retire.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

First of all, it is not a pay raise. It is a Cost of Living Increase, (Adjustment), aka to account, in a very small way, for inflation (the expansion of the money supply). Getting a raise is usually attributed to an increase in productivity, or providing more worth to the company for which you work. And a bonus was for an outstanding contribution to the bottom line. Such as bringing in $100,000 over that of a previous year, or quarter, as compensation, (sharing of the profit), a thank you, and as an encouragement to do it again and again and again.
 
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