Half-Ton People

ylexot

Super Genius
Like I said...
PLEASE NOTE: The BMI indicator is just a guide and may provide misleading results. It does not take into account different body frames, muscle tone, etc. It's important to speak with a physician about your individual weight if you are unsure.

For example, if you are 5'4, 145 pounds but you have a small frame/build, you may look out of shape even though the BMI caluclator says your weight is "desirable."

Those same stats (5'4 and 145 pounds) may look completely different on someone with an average or larger frame/build.

So even though these two people have the same weight and height, they carry it completely differently. The BMI calculator does not take this into consideration.

That's why it's important you speak to a physician about your individual weight.
 
C

CalvertNewbie

Guest
There are two or three shows about this particular mother-son relationship..it is extremely unhealthy..but did you catch the part where her other son died? She is over compensating by indulging him..and he has turned into the biggest spoiled brat imaginable...so fascinating..SO makes fun of me because I love to watch them... but to see the codependence and manipulation happen is amazing...so by her irrational fear he will die..she is killing him. Not sure which one you watched but the follow up shows him GAINING weight after his surgery when he goes home. Imagine, radical surgery..but still gaining! They need to be far away from each other, and quick.
That mother has such mental issues herself. I can't imagine losing a child, I think her son was only a baby when he died - I want to say about a year old. Not sure how he died but of course, it took it's toll emotionally on her. So she continues to treat her adult son like a baby and he enjoys it - it's actually sick. Until they BOTH get extensive therapy, this sick cycle will continue.

My new favorite show is Ruby. She used to be 700+ pounds and now is 350 (and still losing). No surgery either. Just diet and exercise. I've never had a weight problem but I find her story inspirational.
Love that show - she's hilarious. I really admire people who can lose so much weight without surgery. It's hard work, no doubt, and for many of us it's a constant struggle.
 

BadGirl

I am so very blessed
I have been working on my own weight and trying to get healthy for awhile now. It is hard work. When I hear people say oh I lost 100 pounds I am like :faint: then I find out they had surgery. That's the easy way to me. That isn't the same as what I have been doing. I work my butt off everyday.
If you think that having surgery is the easy way out, let me elighten you to some ideas to consider:

I am almost two years post-op. Two nights ago I almost vomited my dinner (lean grilled steak and green beans) because it was just a bit too greasy for my sensitive stomach. A week before that I became ill on mac-n-cheese; it's called dumping, from snacking mindlessly on rice cakes. Disorientation, hot sweats and then cold chills - dumping - a dire consequence of eating the wrong foods with the malabsorptive system. This morning, just like most mornings, I ran up and down nine flights of stairs to begin my day. Last evening I spent 25 minutes strength training to maintain my muscle tone, keep my metabolism running high and making damn sure I don't regain one single pound.

And this is how it will be for the rest of my life. I will vomit, dump, exercise and be vigilant day in and day out if I want this easy weight loss surgery to work for me.

My body does not take weekends off from weight loss surgery. I don't get chocolate cake just because it's my birthday. I do not have a double-cheeseburger with fries and a shake just because I've had a stressful day and I deserve it. My body is on the gastric-bypass plan 24-7.

Do you think that's easy?

Weight Loss Surgery post-ops understand what I'm talking about. Many of us go through a phase of fighting the gastric bypass and engage in snacking or grazing. We out-eat the stomach pouch and regain weight and we become self-loathing. We vomit and dump and do it all over again thinking we can somehow trick the body. Eventually we learn and we get it: WLS is for life.

Weight loss surgery pre-op patients want badly to understand this, but the dieting culture has taught us to be strict for X-number days and then we get a free day. The culture has taught us if we can stick to a plan for X-weeks and lose X-pounds then we can "get back to normal". We are all expert dieters by the time we elect to have gastric bypass surgery.

There is no back to normal after WLS - it is a lifetime lifestyle commitment.

And from a weight-loss support forum:

Have some respect for WLSers! Here’s why:

Hell Week. The days immediately following surgery are the most intense, miserable experience you can imagine. You have been through major surgery and your body will not let you forget it. The pain is bad enough, but the fatigue is worse.Then there is your sudden withdrawal from food. You see it everywhere: your family’s meals, in commercials. You will experience cravings that drive mental anguish to new levels.Hormone levels go a bit haywire, and depression is common. So are vast mood swings. You may well feel like you’re just going insane.All this leads to a serious case of buyers remorse. Why on earth did I do this to my body? Of course, this regret contributes to the mental anguish.Hell Week can be as short as a few days or as long as a couple of weeks. And everyone goes through it.

Dumping. Most gastric bypass patients will experience dumping at least once, some more often. Dumping happens when food (which hasn’t been broken down as thoroughly as it was before surgery) enters the small intestine too quickly. You start to sweat. You’re nauseas and you may even throw up. Or you could have diarrhea. And then you are exhausted and want to sleep.It’s the most miserable feeling you can imagine, and you will do anything to avoid experiencing it again.

Suddenly removing food from your life is traumatic. More so than you can imagine. And it’s not like you can sneak around and cheat like you can on a diet – at least not for a long while. It’s as if a close friend has died.Then there are the emotional ramifications of this loss. You have to do “brain surgery” on yourself, discovering why you overate to begin with and how to change destructive behaviors. It can be very uncomfortable, even though its healthy in the long run.

Complications. There are lots of potential complications and some unpleasant side effects. You can develop infections from surgery. You could develop gall stones and need your gall bladder out. (Been there done that - where’s my t-shirt?) You could develop a stricture (incredibly painful!) and need more surgery. You can develop reactive hypoglycemia, have food blocking the exit of your pouch (again very painful!) or become constipated. Or you could just have painful, smelly gas.

Vitamins. With gastric bypass, the part of your intestine that absorbs much of your nutrients is bypassed. So you must take a range of vitamins every day for the rest of your life. This can mean anywhere from 4 pills up to 12 or more, each and every day. If you don’t take vitamins, or if the ones you take aren’t good enough, you can develop life-threatening deficiencies. You may wind up having to take regular shots or get regular blood transfusions. Either way, it’s no walk in the park.

Protein and water requirements. In addition to constantly popping vitamins, gastric bypass patients must get 60 – 80 grams of protein and 48 – 64 ounces of water every day into a pouch that holds about 1 cup at a time. Lets just say that’s not easy and requires constant effort.

You still have to watch what you eat and exercise. This is the biggest myth out there – that having gastric bypass surgery means weight magically falls off of you with no effort. And while you may lose some weight without exercise, if you want to see real results you have to get moving. And you can’t just shove anything in your mouth, either. Even if you happen to be one of the “lucky” few who can eat anything without dumping, unhealthy foods will stop weight loss and start regain. Just like they will for anyone else.

Does that sound “easy” and “automatic” to you? Of course not.
 

Larry Gude

Strung Out
If you think that having surgery is the easy way out, let me elighten you to some ideas to consider:

I am almost two years post-op. Two nights ago I almost vomited my dinner (lean grilled steak and green beans) because it was just a bit too greasy for my sensitive stomach. A week before that I became ill on mac-n-cheese; it's called dumping, from snacking mindlessly on rice cakes. Disorientation, hot sweats and then cold chills - dumping - a dire consequence of eating the wrong foods with the malabsorptive system. This morning, just like most mornings, I ran up and down nine flights of stairs to begin my day. Last evening I spent 25 minutes strength training to maintain my muscle tone, keep my metabolism running high and making damn sure I don't regain one single pound.

And this is how it will be for the rest of my life. I will vomit, dump, exercise and be vigilant day in and day out if I want this easy weight loss surgery to work for me.

My body does not take weekends off from weight loss surgery. I don't get chocolate cake just because it's my birthday. I do not have a double-cheeseburger with fries and a shake just because I've had a stressful day and I deserve it. My body is on the gastric-bypass plan 24-7.

Do you think that's easy?

Weight Loss Surgery post-ops understand what I'm talking about. Many of us go through a phase of fighting the gastric bypass and engage in snacking or grazing. We out-eat the stomach pouch and regain weight and we become self-loathing. We vomit and dump and do it all over again thinking we can somehow trick the body. Eventually we learn and we get it: WLS is for life.

Weight loss surgery pre-op patients want badly to understand this, but the dieting culture has taught us to be strict for X-number days and then we get a free day. The culture has taught us if we can stick to a plan for X-weeks and lose X-pounds then we can "get back to normal". We are all expert dieters by the time we elect to have gastric bypass surgery.

There is no back to normal after WLS - it is a lifetime lifestyle commitment.

And from a weight-loss support forum:

Have some respect for WLSers! Here’s why:

Hell Week. The days immediately following surgery are the most intense, miserable experience you can imagine. You have been through major surgery and your body will not let you forget it. The pain is bad enough, but the fatigue is worse.Then there is your sudden withdrawal from food. You see it everywhere: your family’s meals, in commercials. You will experience cravings that drive mental anguish to new levels.Hormone levels go a bit haywire, and depression is common. So are vast mood swings. You may well feel like you’re just going insane.All this leads to a serious case of buyers remorse. Why on earth did I do this to my body? Of course, this regret contributes to the mental anguish.Hell Week can be as short as a few days or as long as a couple of weeks. And everyone goes through it.

Dumping. Most gastric bypass patients will experience dumping at least once, some more often. Dumping happens when food (which hasn’t been broken down as thoroughly as it was before surgery) enters the small intestine too quickly. You start to sweat. You’re nauseas and you may even throw up. Or you could have diarrhea. And then you are exhausted and want to sleep.It’s the most miserable feeling you can imagine, and you will do anything to avoid experiencing it again.

Suddenly removing food from your life is traumatic. More so than you can imagine. And it’s not like you can sneak around and cheat like you can on a diet – at least not for a long while. It’s as if a close friend has died.Then there are the emotional ramifications of this loss. You have to do “brain surgery” on yourself, discovering why you overate to begin with and how to change destructive behaviors. It can be very uncomfortable, even though its healthy in the long run.

Complications. There are lots of potential complications and some unpleasant side effects. You can develop infections from surgery. You could develop gall stones and need your gall bladder out. (Been there done that - where’s my t-shirt?) You could develop a stricture (incredibly painful!) and need more surgery. You can develop reactive hypoglycemia, have food blocking the exit of your pouch (again very painful!) or become constipated. Or you could just have painful, smelly gas.

Vitamins. With gastric bypass, the part of your intestine that absorbs much of your nutrients is bypassed. So you must take a range of vitamins every day for the rest of your life. This can mean anywhere from 4 pills up to 12 or more, each and every day. If you don’t take vitamins, or if the ones you take aren’t good enough, you can develop life-threatening deficiencies. You may wind up having to take regular shots or get regular blood transfusions. Either way, it’s no walk in the park.

Protein and water requirements. In addition to constantly popping vitamins, gastric bypass patients must get 60 – 80 grams of protein and 48 – 64 ounces of water every day into a pouch that holds about 1 cup at a time. Lets just say that’s not easy and requires constant effort.

You still have to watch what you eat and exercise. This is the biggest myth out there – that having gastric bypass surgery means weight magically falls off of you with no effort. And while you may lose some weight without exercise, if you want to see real results you have to get moving. And you can’t just shove anything in your mouth, either. Even if you happen to be one of the “lucky” few who can eat anything without dumping, unhealthy foods will stop weight loss and start regain. Just like they will for anyone else.

Does that sound “easy” and “automatic” to you? Of course not.
My gawd! People like you always humble me, the ones who fight a daily battle and just keep going. :notworthy:
 
If you think that having surgery is the easy way out, let me elighten you to some ideas to consider:
....

Does that sound “easy” and “automatic” to you? Of course not.
Thank you for the enlightenment. I had no idea. :huggy:
 
C

CalvertNewbie

Guest
If you think that having surgery is the easy way out, let me elighten you to some ideas to consider:

I am almost two years post-op. Two nights ago I almost vomited my dinner (lean grilled steak and green beans) because it was just a bit too greasy for my sensitive stomach. A week before that I became ill on mac-n-cheese; it's called dumping, from snacking mindlessly on rice cakes. Disorientation, hot sweats and then cold chills - dumping - a dire consequence of eating the wrong foods with the malabsorptive system. This morning, just like most mornings, I ran up and down nine flights of stairs to begin my day. Last evening I spent 25 minutes strength training to maintain my muscle tone, keep my metabolism running high and making damn sure I don't regain one single pound.

And this is how it will be for the rest of my life. I will vomit, dump, exercise and be vigilant day in and day out if I want this easy weight loss surgery to work for me.

My body does not take weekends off from weight loss surgery. I don't get chocolate cake just because it's my birthday. I do not have a double-cheeseburger with fries and a shake just because I've had a stressful day and I deserve it. My body is on the gastric-bypass plan 24-7.

Do you think that's easy?

Weight Loss Surgery post-ops understand what I'm talking about. Many of us go through a phase of fighting the gastric bypass and engage in snacking or grazing. We out-eat the stomach pouch and regain weight and we become self-loathing. We vomit and dump and do it all over again thinking we can somehow trick the body. Eventually we learn and we get it: WLS is for life.

Weight loss surgery pre-op patients want badly to understand this, but the dieting culture has taught us to be strict for X-number days and then we get a free day. The culture has taught us if we can stick to a plan for X-weeks and lose X-pounds then we can "get back to normal". We are all expert dieters by the time we elect to have gastric bypass surgery.

There is no back to normal after WLS - it is a lifetime lifestyle commitment.

And from a weight-loss support forum:

Have some respect for WLSers! Here’s why:

Hell Week. The days immediately following surgery are the most intense, miserable experience you can imagine. You have been through major surgery and your body will not let you forget it. The pain is bad enough, but the fatigue is worse.Then there is your sudden withdrawal from food. You see it everywhere: your family’s meals, in commercials. You will experience cravings that drive mental anguish to new levels.Hormone levels go a bit haywire, and depression is common. So are vast mood swings. You may well feel like you’re just going insane.All this leads to a serious case of buyers remorse. Why on earth did I do this to my body? Of course, this regret contributes to the mental anguish.Hell Week can be as short as a few days or as long as a couple of weeks. And everyone goes through it.

Dumping. Most gastric bypass patients will experience dumping at least once, some more often. Dumping happens when food (which hasn’t been broken down as thoroughly as it was before surgery) enters the small intestine too quickly. You start to sweat. You’re nauseas and you may even throw up. Or you could have diarrhea. And then you are exhausted and want to sleep.It’s the most miserable feeling you can imagine, and you will do anything to avoid experiencing it again.

Suddenly removing food from your life is traumatic. More so than you can imagine. And it’s not like you can sneak around and cheat like you can on a diet – at least not for a long while. It’s as if a close friend has died.Then there are the emotional ramifications of this loss. You have to do “brain surgery” on yourself, discovering why you overate to begin with and how to change destructive behaviors. It can be very uncomfortable, even though its healthy in the long run.

Complications. There are lots of potential complications and some unpleasant side effects. You can develop infections from surgery. You could develop gall stones and need your gall bladder out. (Been there done that - where’s my t-shirt?) You could develop a stricture (incredibly painful!) and need more surgery. You can develop reactive hypoglycemia, have food blocking the exit of your pouch (again very painful!) or become constipated. Or you could just have painful, smelly gas.

Vitamins. With gastric bypass, the part of your intestine that absorbs much of your nutrients is bypassed. So you must take a range of vitamins every day for the rest of your life. This can mean anywhere from 4 pills up to 12 or more, each and every day. If you don’t take vitamins, or if the ones you take aren’t good enough, you can develop life-threatening deficiencies. You may wind up having to take regular shots or get regular blood transfusions. Either way, it’s no walk in the park.

Protein and water requirements. In addition to constantly popping vitamins, gastric bypass patients must get 60 – 80 grams of protein and 48 – 64 ounces of water every day into a pouch that holds about 1 cup at a time. Lets just say that’s not easy and requires constant effort.

You still have to watch what you eat and exercise. This is the biggest myth out there – that having gastric bypass surgery means weight magically falls off of you with no effort. And while you may lose some weight without exercise, if you want to see real results you have to get moving. And you can’t just shove anything in your mouth, either. Even if you happen to be one of the “lucky” few who can eat anything without dumping, unhealthy foods will stop weight loss and start regain. Just like they will for anyone else.

Does that sound “easy” and “automatic” to you? Of course not.
BG, congrats on your success! That's amazing!!!! :yahoo:

I'll admit that at one point, I thought people who had the surgery took the easy way out. My ASSumptions changed dramatically when 2 people I worked with had the surgery. I saw what they & their families went through. One coworker had amazing results. The other wasn't so fortunate. The surgery was certainly no walk in the park for either one of them. First you need to make it through the surgery alive. Then you need to change your entire lifestyle forever. Not easy at all!
 

LusbyMom

You're a LOON :)
If you think that having surgery is the easy way out, let me elighten you to some ideas to consider:

I am almost two years post-op. Two nights ago I almost vomited my dinner (lean grilled steak and green beans) because it was just a bit too greasy for my sensitive stomach. A week before that I became ill on mac-n-cheese; it's called dumping, from snacking mindlessly on rice cakes. Disorientation, hot sweats and then cold chills - dumping - a dire consequence of eating the wrong foods with the malabsorptive system. This morning, just like most mornings, I ran up and down nine flights of stairs to begin my day. Last evening I spent 25 minutes strength training to maintain my muscle tone, keep my metabolism running high and making damn sure I don't regain one single pound.

And this is how it will be for the rest of my life. I will vomit, dump, exercise and be vigilant day in and day out if I want this easy weight loss surgery to work for me.

My body does not take weekends off from weight loss surgery. I don't get chocolate cake just because it's my birthday. I do not have a double-cheeseburger with fries and a shake just because I've had a stressful day and I deserve it. My body is on the gastric-bypass plan 24-7.

Do you think that's easy?

Weight Loss Surgery post-ops understand what I'm talking about. Many of us go through a phase of fighting the gastric bypass and engage in snacking or grazing. We out-eat the stomach pouch and regain weight and we become self-loathing. We vomit and dump and do it all over again thinking we can somehow trick the body. Eventually we learn and we get it: WLS is for life.

Weight loss surgery pre-op patients want badly to understand this, but the dieting culture has taught us to be strict for X-number days and then we get a free day. The culture has taught us if we can stick to a plan for X-weeks and lose X-pounds then we can "get back to normal". We are all expert dieters by the time we elect to have gastric bypass surgery.

There is no back to normal after WLS - it is a lifetime lifestyle commitment.

And from a weight-loss support forum:

Have some respect for WLSers! Here’s why:

Hell Week. The days immediately following surgery are the most intense, miserable experience you can imagine. You have been through major surgery and your body will not let you forget it. The pain is bad enough, but the fatigue is worse.Then there is your sudden withdrawal from food. You see it everywhere: your family’s meals, in commercials. You will experience cravings that drive mental anguish to new levels.Hormone levels go a bit haywire, and depression is common. So are vast mood swings. You may well feel like you’re just going insane.All this leads to a serious case of buyers remorse. Why on earth did I do this to my body? Of course, this regret contributes to the mental anguish.Hell Week can be as short as a few days or as long as a couple of weeks. And everyone goes through it.

Dumping. Most gastric bypass patients will experience dumping at least once, some more often. Dumping happens when food (which hasn’t been broken down as thoroughly as it was before surgery) enters the small intestine too quickly. You start to sweat. You’re nauseas and you may even throw up. Or you could have diarrhea. And then you are exhausted and want to sleep.It’s the most miserable feeling you can imagine, and you will do anything to avoid experiencing it again.

Suddenly removing food from your life is traumatic. More so than you can imagine. And it’s not like you can sneak around and cheat like you can on a diet – at least not for a long while. It’s as if a close friend has died.Then there are the emotional ramifications of this loss. You have to do “brain surgery” on yourself, discovering why you overate to begin with and how to change destructive behaviors. It can be very uncomfortable, even though its healthy in the long run.

Complications. There are lots of potential complications and some unpleasant side effects. You can develop infections from surgery. You could develop gall stones and need your gall bladder out. (Been there done that - where’s my t-shirt?) You could develop a stricture (incredibly painful!) and need more surgery. You can develop reactive hypoglycemia, have food blocking the exit of your pouch (again very painful!) or become constipated. Or you could just have painful, smelly gas.

Vitamins. With gastric bypass, the part of your intestine that absorbs much of your nutrients is bypassed. So you must take a range of vitamins every day for the rest of your life. This can mean anywhere from 4 pills up to 12 or more, each and every day. If you don’t take vitamins, or if the ones you take aren’t good enough, you can develop life-threatening deficiencies. You may wind up having to take regular shots or get regular blood transfusions. Either way, it’s no walk in the park.

Protein and water requirements. In addition to constantly popping vitamins, gastric bypass patients must get 60 – 80 grams of protein and 48 – 64 ounces of water every day into a pouch that holds about 1 cup at a time. Lets just say that’s not easy and requires constant effort.

You still have to watch what you eat and exercise. This is the biggest myth out there – that having gastric bypass surgery means weight magically falls off of you with no effort. And while you may lose some weight without exercise, if you want to see real results you have to get moving. And you can’t just shove anything in your mouth, either. Even if you happen to be one of the “lucky” few who can eat anything without dumping, unhealthy foods will stop weight loss and start regain. Just like they will for anyone else.

Does that sound “easy” and “automatic” to you? Of course not.
I get my opinion of easy by what I have seen. I have 3 friends who have had the surgery. The weight literally fell off of all 3 of them. They do not workout and they don't exercise. It's been a couple years for all of them and they haven't gained. They have made it seem like a breeze. They basically eat the same things they ate before just in much smaller portions. One of them continued to lose far more weight than she even wanted.


With all the life long side effects of the surgery why have it?
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
So if these people are so large they can't get out of bed then they must just &*&^ themselves right there in the bed. Imagine sitting in your own waste until someone comes along to clean you up.

That alone would be motivation enough to trim down and get out of bed.
 
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