Heat Pump Bye-Bye

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Knew it was coming - replaced it when my teenage son was about 3 or 4, and it's been worked hard.

I just didn't want it to happen - NOW. Not sure what to go with, or who to have work on it.
Who should I NOT go with?

Does SMECO still have any incentives, rebates?
 

stgislander

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
The refrigerant has likely changed at least twice. You may be looking at not only the outside compressor but the inside air handler (at least the A coil) as well.

Any chance of going with ductless heat pumps?
 

Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
I've used J.W. Windsor for a very long time, small outfit, but very responsive and won't try to sell you what you don't need. Actually listens. Don't have a full heat pump, just an a/c unit, but had the entire exchanger (air handler) replaced back in 2018 when I replaced the compressor.

301-884-2757
Mechanicsville.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
The refrigerant has likely changed at least twice. You may be looking at not only the outside compressor but the inside air handler (at least the A coil) as well.

Any chance of going with ductless heat pumps?
At this point - I plan to retire and get the hell out of this place in ten years. I don't see the headache of putting those in - much simpler to just replaced what I have, cross my fingers, and leave the problem to someone else.

But - anyone I should avoid? Anyone you've had bad luck with?

BTW - I've been looking for rebates online - wow - really sucks nowadays. There's close to nuthin'.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
The refrigerant has likely changed at least twice. You may be looking at not only the outside compressor but the inside air handler (at least the A coil) as well.

Any chance of going with ductless heat pumps?
Oh and yes - the coolant is outdated. So with the failed pump -

Anyway, also looking to HUGELY insulate and re-do the attic, so some things will improve - I hope.
I can only guess how much a failing heat pump has cost me the last few years.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
We've used Boothe (mostly) and Great Mills HVAC (on the new house). The efficiency of the latest units will blow your mind when you get the electric bill after the change.
 

glhs837

Power with Control
We've used Boothe (mostly) and Great Mills HVAC (on the new house). The efficiency of the latest units will blow your mind when you get the electric bill after the change.

Used a licensed relative to replace the early 90s 2.5 ton that handles the basement and first floor, and Boothes to replace the late 80s 1 ton that handled the 700 sqft top floor. I wanted a commercial style minisplit for the second unit and the relative didn't feel comfortable doing it. I no kidding cut my bill in half. Summer monthly bills went from about low $400s to mid $200s. Winter from mid to low 300s to lower 200s.
 

SandieGarry

Active Member
I've used J.W. Windsor for a very long time, small outfit, but very responsive and won't try to sell you what you don't need. Actually listens. Don't have a full heat pump, just an a/c unit, but had the entire exchanger (air handler) replaced back in 2018 when I replaced the compressor.

301-884-2757
Mechanicsville.
I know of Mr Windsor. I have never heard anything about his business, always wondered. Thanks for the feedback.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
We've used Boothe (mostly) and Great Mills HVAC (on the new house). The efficiency of the latest units will blow your mind when you get the electric bill after the change.
How high SEER did you go? I'm wondering - since I plan to leave here in ~10 years - is it worth it to buy a really nice one?
Tech that examined my furnace mentioned his heat pump has like, a low power cycle and a higher power - and it saves money when it only needs a little bit of temperature change. Which is most of the time.
 

General Lee

Well-Known Member
Plan so far is to go with Boothe. Seem like good folks. I'll know Tuesday.
Good folks, its hard to beat their customer service. I'm not thrilled they are a Rheem dealer now but they go with best bid contract. A few years ago they had American Standard. Most brands have comparable warranties anyway, so a good install and support after is what you want.
 

Sneakers

Just sneakin' around....
since I plan to leave here in ~10 years - is it worth it to buy a really nice one?
Buy it for you, for now. A lot can happen in 10 years.
Warranty on most new units is 10 years. If you have a transferable warranty, that's a good thing. Most thoughtful people buying a home ask the age of the compressor, and if it's older, compute that in for potential replacement.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
How high SEER did you go? I'm wondering - since I plan to leave here in ~10 years - is it worth it to buy a really nice one?
Tech that examined my furnace mentioned his heat pump has like, a low power cycle and a higher power - and it saves money when it only needs a little bit of temperature change. Which is most of the time.
I’d have to check the file on them but I believe the units we have are 23 SEER, variable speed. I have two..one that controls three zones on first floor and one for the entire second floor.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
Just a thought, but HSPF may be more important than SEER depending on how you set your thermostat. Most of these units are already pretty efficient, and you will see a bigger difference in saved power during the cold months on a 10 HSPF (vs an 8) than you will save in summer months going from 16 SEER to 24 SEER.

Two reasons, one is that the higher the rating the lesser amount saved per rating (like MPG, going from 10 to 20 is an increase in 10 but doubles how far you can drive. Going from 50 to 60 is the same 10 mpg but only increases your distance 20%).

The other reason is that most people set their summer thermostat around 75, so maybe a 20 degree drop from the outside temp and the unit is still very efficient even at 95 degrees. But in winter months you may set your temp to 68 and it's 32 degrees out (so a 36 degree difference) and the heatpump becomes MUCH less efficient as you get at or below freezing. And typically the higher the HSPF the lower temp it can go before it has to resort to using the backup heat registers ($$$).

This is why the geothermal is so good, can pull from ~60 degree source all year round which can be used directly for cooling and only needs to be raised less than 10 degrees to provide comfortable heat.
 
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PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
Was going to say I have a 15 SEER unit that works well and doesnt seem to use much power, the electric bill is maybe $20 more in Janurary than it is in October.
 

Peepaw95

Member
At this point - I plan to retire and get the hell out of this place in ten years. I don't see the headache of putting those in - much simpler to just replaced what I have, cross my fingers, and leave the problem to someone else.

But - anyone I should avoid? Anyone you've had bad luck with?

BTW - I've been looking for rebates online - wow - really sucks nowadays. There's close to nuthin'.
Cliff's. Expensive and stiffs you on warranty work.
 
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