How is Starlink different than Hughes for satellite internet?

glhs837

Power with Control
This awesome interactive map shows how. Keep in mind, this shows only the active +700 satellites, of which 140 seem to still be raising altitude to the 500ish KMs they operate at. They can be easily spotted as they are the ones in "train" formation. This small portion of the future web still has seen speedtests between 50-100mbps and pings below 40, in some cases less than 20ms. They are shooting for two launches of 60 sats each every month.

https://satellitemap.space/?fbclid=IwAR1rbbQnO2DlK28-ehPQGEl8zmNKQwiPdgzEAJRQ-sRh1eRzDxCajMKEvVc
 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member
This awesome interactive map shows how. Keep in mind, this shows only the active +700 satellites, of which 140 seem to still be raising altitude to the 500ish KMs they operate at. They can be easily spotted as they are the ones in "train" formation. This small portion of the future web still has seen speedtests between 50-100mbps and pings below 40, in some cases less than 20ms. They are shooting for two launches of 60 sats each every month.

https://satellitemap.space/?fbclid=IwAR1rbbQnO2DlK28-ehPQGEl8zmNKQwiPdgzEAJRQ-sRh1eRzDxCajMKEvVc
Have they solved the atmospheric issues that Hughes satellite internet, DirecTV and Dishnet have, i.e., no signal during thunderstorms?
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Have they solved the atmospheric issues that Hughes satellite internet, DirecTV and Dishnet have, i.e., no signal during thunderstorms?

Hughesnet is absolutely terrible, and I won't hold my breath on Starlink.

Since both of you question relate to the same major difference, you get the same answer. The atmospheric interference and terrible speeds relate to the fact that HN sits in geosynchronous orbits, and not many of them. You can expect service that rivals or betters the high tiered service from a cable provider. In both reliability and speed. And cost. Expectation is that you will be in the $200-$300 range for the antenna and router/modem combo and the area of $80 a month for service.

GL, it's really a Chevette to Corvetter comparison. Two completely different systems.
 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member
Since both of you question relate to the same major difference, you get the same answer. The atmospheric interference and terrible speeds relate to the fact that HN sits in geosynchronous orbits, and not many of them. You can expect service that rivals or betters the high tiered service from a cable provider. In both reliability and speed. And cost. Expectation is that you will be in the $200-$300 range for the antenna and router/modem combo and the area of $80 a month for service.

GL, it's really a Chevette to Corvetter comparison. Two completely different systems.
Thanks for the info. I look forward to reading the performance specs with a couple years of user data
 

General Lee

Well-Known Member
Since both of you question relate to the same major difference, you get the same answer. The atmospheric interference and terrible speeds relate to the fact that HN sits in geosynchronous orbits, and not many of them. You can expect service that rivals or betters the high tiered service from a cable provider. In both reliability and speed. And cost. Expectation is that you will be in the $200-$300 range for the antenna and router/modem combo and the area of $80 a month for service.

GL, it's really a Chevette to Corvetter comparison. Two completely different systems.
Even if starlink ends up being light years better, unless they offer unlimited data .......I'll pass. In this day and age capped data isn't worth the money and effort to sign up. Now if I'm in the boondocks of Alaska, gotta take what I can get I guess. I used Hughesnet for over 12 years.......No more. Screw them
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Even if starlink ends up being light years better, unless they offer unlimited data .......I'll pass. In this day and age capped data isn't worth the money and effort to sign up. Now if I'm in the boondocks of Alaska, gotta take what I can get I guess. I used Hughesnet for over 12 years.......No more. Screw them

Thats the big question, data caps. None, reasonable ones, or silly ones. Given this is really intended for un and underserved areas, it will be a question of customer density over network capacity. At some point they plan to roll out sat to sat laser comm links to spread the network load, but we've not seen those yet. Is there such a thing as a reasonable cap? On a reddit thread, there was a consensus that at some point, drawing a line is reasonable. What that looks like? Everybody seemed to agree the guy hosting 500 streams of 8K hentai might be over the line. :)
Since he expects to start offering regular consumer service before the end of the year, we'll see. Buddy of mine who has a lakefront cabin in Maine and just spent $200 bucks setting up a very directional cell amplifier so he can use a hotspot cant wait.
 
Top