How would you handle it?

sockgirl77

Well-Known Member
Oh, did someone call for the Food Nazi? :howdy:



Sorry, this is junk, not lunch. The only thing in there that resembles actual food is the apple. And actual goldfish would at least have some protein and nutrients. Not that I'm impressed with the corn dog they gave your son instead....

I'm not trying to offend you, although I'm sure I have, but this is why the government thinks it needs to get involved in what we feed our children. While I wouldn't have taken his lunch away and replaced it (with a corn dog :rolleyes:), I'd have done a slow burn and privately wondered why parents set their children up for health problems later in life. Not to mention the carb crash that will surely come later in the day.

If I were in your shoes, though, I'd have more of a bitch about the replacement "meal". If they're going to criticize you and replace the lunch you sent with your child, it should at the very least be something more nutritious and substantial than what you packed for him. Corn dogs are a treat, not a meal.
The child is five and maybe that's all that he/she needs. My youngest used to only pick at food and eat small meals when she was five. Portion-wise, that's about what a five year old needs. But this is America and we must create obesity in Kindergarten.
 

Vince

......
Way back when I went to school :whistle: parents didn't make lunch. They provided the bread, the bologna, mustard and occasional potato chips and a piece of fruit. You made your lunch and you ate what you made. The school had nothing to do with regulating your diet. But activities back then consisted of actually getting outdoors and expending a whole bunch of energy.
 
Came across this looking for something else. I know I rarely post, but if anyone is interested, that 5 year old is now 12 and has turned into a kid who wants the best in food. He doesn't get it very often, but his favorite meal time foods are Crab Legs, Steak, Lobster, Blue Crabs, Grilled Salmon, Grilled Rosemary Chicken, and he's trying my grilled oysters. Went to one of the restaurants in the Gaylord a couple weeks ago and he wanted to order the $180 Cowboy Ribeye, Truffle Parmesan Fries and a Caesar salad. Had to put the no on that one. He ended up with a Filet instead. Still expensive but it was a treat meal for the whole family.

My now 16 year old still eats whatever we put in front of him, regardless of whether he likes it or not, and my now 10 year old is still the veggie kid.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Came across this looking for something else. I know I rarely post, but if anyone is interested, that 5 year old is now 12 and has turned into a kid who wants the best in food. He doesn't get it very often, but his favorite meal time foods are Crab Legs, Steak, Lobster, Blue Crabs, Grilled Salmon, Grilled Rosemary Chicken, and he's trying my grilled oysters. Went to one of the restaurants in the Gaylord a couple weeks ago and he wanted to order the $180 Cowboy Ribeye, Truffle Parmesan Fries and a Caesar salad. Had to put the no on that one. He ended up with a Filet instead. Still expensive but it was a treat meal for the whole family.

My now 16 year old still eats whatever we put in front of him, regardless of whether he likes it or not, and my now 10 year old is still the veggie kid.

So I'm guessing school corndogs are off the table?

:lol:

I like to see young people with a grown up palate. They usually grow up to be excellent cooks, if not outright chefs, who feed the rest of us. :cheers:
 
So I'm guessing school corndogs are off the table?

:lol:

I like to see young people with a grown up palate. They usually grow up to be excellent cooks, if not outright chefs, who feed the rest of us. :cheers:

He still eats corndog's, not from school, but it's the exception not the rule. Funny you should say that about him cooking. He loves it. He makes an excellent omelet with various veggies and meats, and always wants to help grill, smoke, cook whatever is on the menu for the day. Taking the boys out for dinner tonight at Texas Roadhouse so that darling wife can do some Santa stuff, and I'm sure they'll all be picking their steak from the case.

I
 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member
Scenario - Child starts KG at a St. Mary's County school. Mom packs his lunch (peanut butter crackers, apples, gold fish (the cracker kind), fruit snacks, and a bottle of water). Teachers aide looks at his lunch and says that it's not adequate, says it's a snack, not a lunch. Takes his lunch and makes him buy a school lunch. School lunch consists of a corn dog and carrots. Cost - son confused, upset that he couldn't eat what mom made him, $2.45 hit to the lunch account.

My opinion is that the aide was severely out of line. Mom spoke to teacher and received an apology and promise that it wouldn't happen again, so we're letting go at that.

Question I have is whether I should push to not have to pay for that lunch. It's not about the amount, that part is inconsequential...it's the principle.

Just curious as to how others would have handled the situation had it been their child.
Ewwww. Carrots.
 
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