Ideas for small dog containment systems?

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Our tiny little dog has been in hog heaven for at least a year - we have a huge back yard.
But she's begun challenging us with constantly trying to get out.
At first it was as easy as plugging up obvious points of escape, but lately she's been probing every
inch for places to dig under, ways to climb around - any means of getting out.

I really don't want to go in-ground invisible fence - mainly because the last one took days to install -
and they found ways to defeat it anyway. And the other concern is that shock collars would hurt her
too much - I don't think she even weighs four pounds.

Suggestions? What has worked?
 

Auntie Biache'

Active Member
Lay hardware cloth, or similar size metal fencing, on the ground next to the fence. It's the same thing we use on the outside of our chicken coops to keep diggers out.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Where there's a will, there's a way.

Auntie's suggestion is probably the best you can do, but I've also seen railroad ties laid along the fence line that seemed to do the trick.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
Could always run an electric dog-fence along the bottom of your real fence, so you don't neet to bury it. If you buy the home kits you are looking at around $100 and an afternoon to install. And given you have the physical fence you don't even need to bother with the training and could probably use the lowest settings on the collar (because they gradually ramp up, might be too slow for a dog running with no barrier but more than enough to discourage a digger)
 

Homer J

Power Chord
Motion sensor sprinklers may be effective as well. They are made to keep animals out of your yard, but they would probably work the other way too.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
Where does she go when she escapes? Besides having a large fenced yard, does she get walks and play time? Is she trying to escape because she is bored and wants to run?
A recommendation for "diggers" is to get a kiddie pool and fill with sand and some dog toys. Let the dog dig to his or her content.
 

Auntie Biache'

Active Member
Oh, about shock collars. A lot of people confuse shock collars with e-collars. E-collars are like TENS that people use to stimulate muscles, and I believe most of them also come with a "vibrate" setting. The TENS can be set so low, that you can't even feel it, so setting something for your dog that you would feel comfortable with would be easy. Many dogs, after a few days, will stop bad behavior just because they have the collar on. Just something to look into.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Where does she go when she escapes? Besides having a large fenced yard, does she get walks and play time? Is she trying to escape because she is bored and wants to run?
ANYWHERE. She still has the basic temperament of a puppy, so she wants to see everything.
She's also a rescue, which is why we think she has an absurd obsession with food or anything she can eat.
She will eat anything - throw up - and find something else to eat.

We have a kiddie pool we've filled with water, but she's not interested in it, but we do have sand, so that could be something.

As far as play time, the kids still love to play with her, and two of them probably strain her ability by the constant attention.

I'm still concerned about the collars for invisible fences - she is very small - part chihuahua - and I've read that some can be harmful.

The current problem that is the hardest to overcome is that one fence along the side of our yard is completely overgrown with trees
and brush, and over time, branches and boughs have pushed and distorted the fence - and it takes a chainsaw for a human sized
creature to get inside - but it's easy for a tiny dog. Years ago I painstakingly crawled on my belly to poke in wires for an invisible fence,
but the growth is far to extensive now. I'd almost be willing to build ANOTHER fence inside my yard, if I could afford it.

We've placed flat cinder blocks at all areas of the fence we've found, including gates, which makes passage cumbersome.
She's resourceful, and God help us if she learns to climb - some parts of the fence are only 3-4 feet high.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Motion sensor sprinklers may be effective as well. They are made to keep animals out of your yard, but they would probably work the other way too.
You know, I was hoping someone had invented motion sensor - something else, like a high pitch sound.
My main concern is about 100 ft of fence running down one side of my house - too many opportunities.
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
Electric fence along the base? My parents have two escape artists and a split rail fence. They put a single electric rail along the base of the fence and now they don't try to get out (or pee on the fence).
 
Potentially inexpensive easy solution. Get a hidden dog treat toy and use it extensively at playtime. Get a large light one. When she starts taking it everywhere, there will be the possibility she won't be able to get it through the opening and will choose to stay. Cheap. Won't hurt to try.

 
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