Is anyone a landlord?

frequentflier

happy to be living
We have an apartment for rent. Last year and then last night I got calls from two different people asking "if I would be willing to look at their paperwork?"
The female last year, though employed in Waldorf, stated she had money available to her for the deposit and a couple months rent. And wanted to know if I was willing to look at her paperwork. She said it was not section 8 but government money. She had been out of work for awhile and said she was getting help getting back on her feet.
Last night I received a call from a male that first announced he was in a fierce custody battle for his two boys. He said he makes $20,000 a year and attends and gets paid to go to school in upper Marlboro and wanted to know if I was willing to look at his paperwork since he was getting help with the deposit and rent. I believe he said he lives in Waldorf. I told him I did not think the apartment was large enough for an adult and two children then he said they may only be with him weekends which contradicts what he 1st told me. He also attends school close to an hour away and I asked if he knew where Lusby is?!

The apartment (which is currently listed here on somd) is attached to our home. Though we aren't in anybody's business, we don't want problems that may arise from tenants that aren't too stable and have drama.

But the "willing to look at my paperwork" has thrown me especially from two different people (ironically both from Waldorf). If it isn't section eight, then what is it? A scam?

FWIW, as much as I would like to have the place rented, it can sit empty until the right people come along. Preferrably a single person or couple; gainfully employed or retired.
 
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frequentflier

happy to be living
In thinking about it more, my fear is letting someone in and them not paying the rent. I understand the eviction process is beneficial for people that are being evicted; not necessarily for the landlord.
 
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NextJen

Raisin cane
PREMO Member
In thinking about it more, my fear is letting someone in and them not paying the rent. I understand the eviction process is beneficial for people that are being eviction; not necessarily for the landlord.
I've heard this to be true too. Be very careful who you let in.
 

Auntie Biache'

Well-Known Member
Sit on your rental until the right renter comes along. Otherwise, you'll regret it. When our "renters", who didn't pay rent, finally moved out, they owed the elec company $2000, the water company $400 (which we had to pay), and they owed us several months rent. They also did a great deal of damage to the house. We're lucky we were able to sell it, and we took a hit, just to get out from under it. I'll never rent again. Don't rent to anyone making promises, or claiming that they have rent coming from anywhere besides a job that they have been at for an extended period of time, preferably military or 3 character company names (Bird Dog).
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
"Look at my paperwork" sounds like a way that they pre disqualify themselves. In reality they could end up being solid tenants but folks using some sort of aid aren't your best option if you are looking for hassle free renters. Same with a church. I had a guy who's pastor came and gave me the down payment. I had to get rid of them a few months later. Also beware of someone that pleads for someone to give them a chance or similar hard luck story.

You can also get a realtor to get you a tenant. They get a lot of inquiries for rentals. There is a fee but usually the renter is vetted and reliable. The fee is usually equal to the first month's rent.
 

luvmygdaughters

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
Two things strike an alarm with me, one- Waldorf! Two- both are getting "financial aid" to cover their rent. Nope, Nada, sorry. There are quite a few places that take vouchers and section 8. I wouldnt rent to anyone who hasnt shown some stability in a job and had great references from a former landlord.
 

nutz

Well-Known Member
We have an apartment for rent. Last year and then last night I got calls from two different people asking "if I would be willing to look at their paperwork?"
The female last year, though employed in Waldorf, stated she had money available to her for the deposit and a couple months rent. And wanted to know if I was willing to look at her paperwork. She said it was not section 8 but government money. She had been out of work for awhile and said she was getting help getting back on her feet.
Last night I received a call from a male that first announced he was in a fierce custody battle for his two boys. He said he makes $20,000 a year and attends and gets paid to go to school in upper Marlboro and wanted to know if I was willing to look at his paperwork since he was getting help with the deposit and rent. I believe he said he lives in Waldorf. I told him I did not think the apartment was large enough for an adult and two children then he said they may only be with him weekends which contradicts what he 1st told me. He also attends school close to an hour away and I asked if he knew where Lusby is?!

The apartment (which is currently listed here on somd) is attached to our home. Though we aren't in anybody's business, we don't want problems that may arise from tenants that aren't too stable and have drama.

But the "willing to look at my paperwork" has thrown me especially from two different people (ironically both from Waldorf). If it isn't section eight, then what is it? A scam?

FWIW, as much as I would like to have the place rented, it can sit empty until the right people come along. Preferrably a single person or couple; gainfully employed or retired.
My guess, “The Housing Choice Voucher Tenant-Based Program provides rental assistance to eligible families or individuals who find their own housing (single-family homes, townhouses and apartments) as long it meets the requirements of the program. If participants want to move to another location, they simply apply to take their voucher with them to a new home, even out of state. Participants pay a portion of the rent that is based on a percentage of the family’s income (on average about 30 percent), and DCHA pays the rest of the rent directly to the landlord.”

Havent quite got the documents together but......under this program they get residents to leave, then when their eligibility expires the resident is no longer a resident...poof, D.C. gets rid of a huge part of their housing problem and the ex-residents become Waldorfians, Lusbians, Bowieans, etc.

Pretty cool way to eliminate bitching, you dont through them out, you give them money to move, one way. Substandard housing now becomes part of the new mecca, yuppie town. Look around Nats stadium.
 

Goldenhawk

Well-Known Member
A lot of the riffraff goes away when you insist upon a credit check and background check. We use TransUnion SmartMove. The applicant pays about $40 for the check, and we get the results via email within an hour. Since they apply and pay, it doesn't hurt their credit score as a credit check from a bank or mortgage company would.

Patience is better than being scammed or having to do major repairs.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

In thinking about it more, my fear is letting someone in and them not paying the rent. I understand the eviction process is beneficial for people that are being evicted; not necessarily for the landlord.
I'm pretty sure, since you live on the property itself, with the space to be rented attached to, part of, your home, the eviction process is quite different. Reason? Because at any time, if a tenet becomes a threat to you or your family, fails to pay rent etc. you have an absolute right, to forcefully if necessary by the Sheriff, have them removed. The courts need not be involved. The usual tenant laws do not apply as would with a single family dwelling. Also, since it is attached to and part of your home, you can restrict who you allow to rent to. Single people only with no kids. No pets. Married couple with no kids. Collage student only. Etc. Only because you are living there as well.
 

mitzi

Well-Known Member
If participants want to move to another location, they simply apply to take their voucher with them to a new home, even out of state.
This is not only the rule of DC. It's the same in every state I believe. Housing Authority is federally funded. Also, you must qualify for Housing Assistance. If you are a single person with no children or no disability, you aren't qualified.
 
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black dog

Free America
PREMO Member
A lot of the riffraff goes away when you insist upon a credit check and background check. We use TransUnion SmartMove. The applicant pays about $40 for the check, and we get the results via email within an hour. Since they apply and pay, it doesn't hurt their credit score as a credit check from a bank or mortgage company would.

Patience is better than being scammed or having to do major repairs.
Yep, lots of good information above. I have a rental in Bethesda, I would never let a renter move in before a credit / background check has been done.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
If I may ...


I'm pretty sure, since you live on the property itself, with the space to be rented attached to, part of, your home, the eviction process is quite different. Reason? Because at any time, if a tenet becomes a threat to you or your family, fails to pay rent etc. you have an absolute right, to forcefully if necessary by the Sheriff, have them removed. The courts need not be involved. The usual tenant laws do not apply as would with a single family dwelling. Also, since it is attached to and part of your home, you can restrict who you allow to rent to. Single people only with no kids. No pets. Married couple with no kids. Collage student only. Etc. Only because you are living there as well.
A friend of mine who is both a realtor and landlord in another state, said the rules are different for my situation because I had a call about a person that suffered severe anxiety. Because the apartment is attached to my home, he said the rules were different for ADA applicants.
As I stated, I would rather have an empty apartment than to rent to a problem tenant. I love my two acres and appreciate the surrounding woods and quiet, the wildlife and serenity. Though it should and could bring some income, my peace of mind is worth more than any amount of money!
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
I have five rentals properties.......If they don't work for the Navy or work for a company that has three or more letter in its name ie BAE, CSC, etc....I don't rent to them.
We are 7 minutes from Solomons but being on the "other side of the bridge," many people I have spoken to do not want to deal with the traffic. Since owning the house, our tenants have been from Kiewit, Dominion and the Chesapeake Biological lab, all in Calvert.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
"Look at my paperwork" sounds like a way that they pre disqualify themselves. In reality they could end up being solid tenants but folks using some sort of aid aren't your best option if you are looking for hassle free renters. Same with a church. I had a guy who's pastor came and gave me the down payment. I had to get rid of them a few months later. Also beware of someone that pleads for someone to give them a chance or similar hard luck story.

You can also get a realtor to get you a tenant. They get a lot of inquiries for rentals. There is a fee but usually the renter is vetted and reliable. The fee is usually equal to the first month's rent.
A couple of local realtors that are also customers are aware of the rental. I had one pass my information on but the person wanted to be on the St. Mary's side. I may consider actually hiring a realtor to rent it if it is still empty in a few months. I also tried to get on Airbnb but had some technical difficulties :lmao: and never pursued it further. I guess that is the new wave of renting; though many are not looking for long term rentals.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
Two things strike an alarm with me, one- Waldorf! Two- both are getting "financial aid" to cover their rent. Nope, Nada, sorry. There are quite a few places that take vouchers and section 8. I wouldnt rent to anyone who hasnt shown some stability in a job and had great references from a former landlord.
I rented and lived alone many times in my life. I always left places looking better than I found them. It was funny, I always asked potential new landlords if they wanted to come see my current home...though no one ever took me up on it. Despite having two cats, my rentals never stunk and were always clean and well maintained.
And if necessary (and there were times), I worked 7 days a week and worked two jobs to pay my bills.
It's ok if you take advantage of programs that help you get your life situated and GET SITUATED! But I suspect there are many that will never get off the entitled government tit.
 

officeguy

Well-Known Member
Be careful not to 'discriminate based on the source of funds'.

Have a process that includes a background and credit check. That usually takes care of the 'look at my paperwork' issue.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

Be careful not to 'discriminate based on the source of funds'. Have a process that includes a background and credit check. That usually takes care of the 'look at my paperwork' issue.
That only applies to owners actual dwellings, investment properties as rentals, not used as their primary home. When it comes to renting out such as one's basement, spare room/rooms when the renter will be living within, or aside, all bets are off. Completely different set of rules. Typically renting out a room, basement, that is part of your home, is not covered by landlord and tenant law. But it must be your primary residence and you must reside there as well.
 
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