Leonardtown Man Shot in Chest with Crossbow Flown to Trauma Center

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
On Monday, November 26, 2018 at approximately 10:15 p.m., police fire and rescue personnel responded to Lady Baltimore Avenue, in Leonardtown for the reported shooting.

Dispatchers advised responding units that the victim, a 52-year old male, was shot in the chest with a crossbow.

The shooting was reportedly accidental, however police are investigating.

Emergency personnel arrived on scene at the residence and found the front door locked, firefighters forced entry to find the patient on the ground. He was reported to be conscious and breathing at the time.

Maryland State Police Helicopter Trooper 7 flew the single patient to an area trauma center with serious injuries.
https://smnewsnet.com/archives/444488/leonardtown-man-shot-in-chest-with-crossbow-flown-to-trauma-center/

How in the world does this even happen? Other reports said it was self-inflicted. :jameo:

Of course, the comments are worth reading:

AliceW on November 27, 2018 at 9:15 am

Probably cleaning it and forgot to unload it. I always leave my crossbow loaded with extended magazines.
:lmao:
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

Bolt=arrow. Bolt not set properly? Bolt underweight to the bow's minimum weight causing catastrophic failure of bow limbs when firing. Damaged carbon bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Damaged aluminum bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Today's crossbows have tremendous power. Some with 160 foot lbs + of kinetic energy and with draw weights of 195lbs or more. When that kind of energy is released upon a damaged, weakened, or light bolt, or an improperly set bolt, those bolts can go in every which way, including right back at you. My guess is there was a catastrophic failure, which also destroys the crossbow in the process. If the bolt was still in the victim, then it was a catastrophic failure. Because if it wasn't, the bolt would have gone completely through him and stuck itself in a wall or ceiling.
 

Kyle

Just being a fly in the ointment...
PREMO Member
We need Bow Control.... Nobody needs 16" arrows!!! :jameo: It's a weapon of mass destruction! :cds:
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
If I may ...

Bolt=arrow. Bolt not set properly? Bolt underweight to the bow's minimum weight causing catastrophic failure of bow limbs when firing. Damaged carbon bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Damaged aluminum bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Today's crossbows have tremendous power. Some with 160 foot lbs + of kinetic energy and with draw weights of 195lbs or more. When that kind of energy is released upon a damaged, weakened, or light bolt, or an improperly set bolt, those bolts can go in every which way, including right back at you. My guess is there was a catastrophic failure, which also destroys the crossbow in the process. If the bolt was still in the victim, then it was a catastrophic failure. Because if it wasn't, the bolt would have gone completely through him and stuck itself in a wall or ceiling.
There's simply no way a crossbow is going to shoot a bolt back at the person shooting it.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
If I may ...

Bolt=arrow. Bolt not set properly? Bolt underweight to the bow's minimum weight causing catastrophic failure of bow limbs when firing. Damaged carbon bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Damaged aluminum bolt with catastrophic failure upon firing. Today's crossbows have tremendous power. Some with 160 foot lbs + of kinetic energy and with draw weights of 195lbs or more. When that kind of energy is released upon a damaged, weakened, or light bolt, or an improperly set bolt, those bolts can go in every which way, including right back at you. My guess is there was a catastrophic failure, which also destroys the crossbow in the process. If the bolt was still in the victim, then it was a catastrophic failure. Because if it wasn't, the bolt would have gone completely through him and stuck itself in a wall or ceiling.
Thanks for the information and that is a possibility. But why on earth would you arm that thing INSIDE your residence much less fire it?
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

There's simply no way a crossbow is going to shoot a bolt back at the person shooting it.
With a catastrophic failure, anything is possible. During the machinations of a catastrophic failure a portion of a shattered bolt could be sent beck to the shooter. One thing though, if this guy used a broadhead on that bolt, he would be dead, from bleeding out. Appears the bolt had a field point (target) instead.
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
If I may ...



With a catastrophic failure, anything is possible. During the machinations of a catastrophic failure a portion of a shattered bolt could be sent beck to the shooter. One thing though, if this guy used a broadhead on that bolt, he would be dead, from bleeding out. Appears the bolt had a field point (target) instead.
I guess anything is possible, but to address your points, crossbows won't dry fire. You have to load the bolt all the way back and trip the anti-dry-fire mechanism. To do so, the bolt is held down by a piece below the entire scope and scope mount. The string is behind the bolt so in this hypothetical failure, the bolt would have somehow or another travel in the opposite direction of the potential energy of the xbow.

I hunt every year with a crossbow and simply can't see how it would fire backwards. Even with broken limbs.
 

Bonehead

Well-Known Member
As stated before unless the bolt lost a lot of energy it would pass completely through the body, a gruesome wound to be sure. I am astonished that he survived.
 
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limblips

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
crossbows won't dry fire. You have to load the bolt all the way back and trip the anti-dry-fire mechanism.
Not all crossbows have or are required to have anti-dry fire mechanisms. Most newer ones do but not all and few older than 5 years or so have it.
 
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