Lifting the Capacity Limits on Indoor and Outdoor Venues

TPD

the poor dad
I have to go grocery shopping today and wondered what the protocol would be. I might put my mask on and see what people are doing inside before I remove it. I have this nervous excitement about being able to shop maskless. :lol:
You can shop at HT without a Mask and employees will not say anything.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
I worked at an estate sale in Huntingtown today and when she posted ads, they said masks required. A majority of the people that came in asked if they could do without and we said "of course". Most of the people that did wear them were probably between 20-45 and a majority that whipped them off were older. That lady that ran the sale and I had ours below the chin a lot throughout the day. As the cashier, I was also fortunate to be near an open door and I often stepped outside to grab the fresh air!
 

Grumpy

Well-Known Member
I worked at an estate sale in Huntingtown today and when she posted ads, they said masks required. A majority of the people that came in asked if they could do without and we said "of course". Most of the people that did wear them were probably between 20-45 and a majority that whipped them off were older. That lady that ran the sale and I had ours below the chin a lot throughout the day. As the cashier, I was also fortunate to be near an open door and I often stepped outside to grab the fresh air!
I saw a FB ad for that sale, I think. Was interested until I saw the 'masks required' line. :lol:
 

Bann

Doris Day meets Lady Gaga
PREMO Member
:yahoo: :yahoo: Gonna be fun this summer!

Oh, and since we're on the honor system and masking is only strongly suggested - I've been vaccinated AND I'm not masking.

Thankyoujeeesus
 

TPD

the poor dad
@TPD You going to have a mask burning party when we hit 70%? :party:
Party tomorrow!

 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996



What is HIPAA?


The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-191), familiarly known as HIPAA, established a national platform of consumer privacy protection and marketplace reform. Some key provisions include insurance reforms, privacy and security, administrative simplification, and cost savings.

What is the HIPAA Privacy Rule?

To implement HIPAA, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) issued the “Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information” (the “Privacy Rule”), which established a set of national standards to address the use and disclosure of individuals’ health information—called “protected health information” – by organizations subject to the Privacy Rule—called “covered entities” – as well as standards for individuals’ privacy rights to understand and control how their health information is used.

Implications for Public Health

The Privacy Rule strikes a balance between protecting patient information and allowing traditional public health activities to continue. Generally, disclosure of protected health information without the authorization of the individual is permitted for purposes including but not limited to:
  1. disclosures required by law (45 CFR § 164.512(a)) or
  2. for “public health activities and purposes.” This includes disclosure to “a public health authority that is authorized by law to collect or receive such information for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability, including but not limited to, the reporting of disease, injury, vital events…, and the conduct of public health surveillance,… investigations, and… interventions.” (45 CFR § 164.512(b)(i))
Definition of Public Health Authority

Defined as “an agency or authority of the United States, a State, a territory, a political subdivision of a State or territory, or an Indian tribe, or a person or entity acting under a grant of authority from or contract with such public agency, including the employees or agents of such public agency or its contractors or persons or entities to whom it has granted authority, that is responsible for public health matters as part of its official mandates.” (45 CFR § 164.501)

HIPAA and Vaccine Administration
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
How Does HIPAA Apply When It Comes to Your COVID-19 Vaccination Card and Public or Private Gatherings?


What You Need to Know About Your Medical Privacy If a Wedding Host Asks for Your COVID-19 Vaccination Card to Keep the Party Safe

If you’re invited to a wedding or some other event, and the host asks for your COVID-19 vaccination card, do HIPAA’s healthcare data privacy laws apply? And are there risks in sharing this information even if the event isn’t medically relevant?
More than a year after the COVID-19 pandemic put the world on lockdown, the U.S. is becoming the global leader in COVID-19 vaccinations. As a result, public and private gatherings — from sporting events and concerts, to parties and weddings — are happening again, albeit with health safeguards in place. The most common preventive measure that hosts and vendors are taking is requiring guests to present their COVID-19 vaccination cards.
But whether you’re the guest, the event host, or the event vendor, there are precautions you will need to take to assure medical privacy, says Wedad Suleiman, of Chapman Law Group’s Healthcare Compliance practice group.
On a recent edition of Wedding Industry Law video podcast, she touched on the differences in medical data privacy for the non-healthcare venue versus the medical setting, as well as best practices for storing and purging proof of guests’ COVID-19 vaccination.



Is My COVID-19 Vaccination Card Considered Protected Health Information Under HIPAA?

Yes. As Wedad explains to podcast host Rob Schenk, the information on your COVID-19 vaccination card is a record of your immunization history. It is similar to receiving an annual flu vaccine and having it placed on your medical record.

Would I Have the Same HIPAA Protection If I Showed My COVID-19 Vaccination Card to an Airline, Cruise Line, or Any Other Non-Healthcare Service?

No. HIPAA only protects health information in the healthcare setting, Wedad says, such as a doctor’s office, pain management clinic, hospital, or urgent care facility. HIPAA is regulatory in the healthcare sector, and every health care organization must have policies and procedures in place for protecting personal health information (“PHI”). However, if an airline, travel service, wedding host or vendor, or some other non-medical group asks for proof of COVID-19 vaccination as a requirement for admission, HIPAA would not apply.

Would I Have Any Form of Protection If I Voluntarily Show My COVID-19 Vaccination Card to a Non-Healthcare Entity?

Even though HIPAA is not in effect in the non-healthcare setting, a state or other jurisdiction’s privacy laws may apply depending on how the vendor uses and stores the COVID-19 vaccination card information.
As Wedad points out, the vendor could be violating state law for using the guest’s COVID-19 vaccination information for unintended purposes. A wedding vendor would be breaking the law for saying that vaccination proof is strictly for health and safety purposes at the event, then goes and repurposes that information for something else that the guest never consented to as part of the event.
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
Bunch of us went to Capt. Pats for lunch today. They were still officially "requiring" masks be worn to enter and be seated. Our server said that was likely to change tomorrow or the next day....
I believe no masks goes into effect today at 5pm. :yahoo:
 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member
How Does HIPAA Apply When It Comes to Your COVID-19 Vaccination Card and Public or Private Gatherings?


What You Need to Know About Your Medical Privacy If a Wedding Host Asks for Your COVID-19 Vaccination Card to Keep the Party Safe

If you’re invited to a wedding or some other event, and the host asks for your COVID-19 vaccination card, do HIPAA’s healthcare data privacy laws apply? And are there risks in sharing this information even if the event isn’t medically relevant?
More than a year after the COVID-19 pandemic put the world on lockdown, the U.S. is becoming the global leader in COVID-19 vaccinations. As a result, public and private gatherings — from sporting events and concerts, to parties and weddings — are happening again, albeit with health safeguards in place. The most common preventive measure that hosts and vendors are taking is requiring guests to present their COVID-19 vaccination cards.
But whether you’re the guest, the event host, or the event vendor, there are precautions you will need to take to assure medical privacy, says Wedad Suleiman, of Chapman Law Group’s Healthcare Compliance practice group.
On a recent edition of Wedding Industry Law video podcast, she touched on the differences in medical data privacy for the non-healthcare venue versus the medical setting, as well as best practices for storing and purging proof of guests’ COVID-19 vaccination.



Is My COVID-19 Vaccination Card Considered Protected Health Information Under HIPAA?

Yes. As Wedad explains to podcast host Rob Schenk, the information on your COVID-19 vaccination card is a record of your immunization history. It is similar to receiving an annual flu vaccine and having it placed on your medical record.

Would I Have the Same HIPAA Protection If I Showed My COVID-19 Vaccination Card to an Airline, Cruise Line, or Any Other Non-Healthcare Service?

No. HIPAA only protects health information in the healthcare setting, Wedad says, such as a doctor’s office, pain management clinic, hospital, or urgent care facility. HIPAA is regulatory in the healthcare sector, and every health care organization must have policies and procedures in place for protecting personal health information (“PHI”). However, if an airline, travel service, wedding host or vendor, or some other non-medical group asks for proof of COVID-19 vaccination as a requirement for admission, HIPAA would not apply.

Would I Have Any Form of Protection If I Voluntarily Show My COVID-19 Vaccination Card to a Non-Healthcare Entity?

Even though HIPAA is not in effect in the non-healthcare setting, a state or other jurisdiction’s privacy laws may apply depending on how the vendor uses and stores the COVID-19 vaccination card information.
As Wedad points out, the vendor could be violating state law for using the guest’s COVID-19 vaccination information for unintended purposes. A wedding vendor would be breaking the law for saying that vaccination proof is strictly for health and safety purposes at the event, then goes and repurposes that information for something else that the guest never consented to as part of the event.
Thank you. That was very informative. So basically we do not have HIPAA to protect us from businesses requiring we show our vaccination cards. But we do have our wallets, meaning we dont have to spend our money at those establishments.
 

Bann

Doris Day meets Lady Gaga
PREMO Member
Thank you. That was very informative. So basically we do not have HIPAA to protect us from businesses requiring we show our vaccination cards. But we do have our wallets, meaning we dont have to spend our money at those establishments.
Are they are going to hold them up like they might be counterfeit money and inspect them?

Hell, I had a fake ID when I was not yet 21, and I'm sure I've learned a thing or two in my 4 decades since then. :whistle:
 
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