Makin' bacon

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
I am on the oven baked bandwagon now and will NEVER fry it again. :yahoo: Use a pan with a rack (I line the pan with foil for easy clean up) and space the slices evenly across the rack. Cook at 400 degrees for 15 minutes or your desired level of crispiness. Drain on paper towels. Eat. 😋

This is the pan I have:

 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
I am on the oven baked bandwagon now and will NEVER fry it again. :yahoo: Use a pan with a rack (I line the pan with foil for easy clean up) and space the slices evenly across the rack. Cook at 400 degrees for 15 minutes or your desired level of crispiness. Drain on paper towels. Eat. 😋

This is the pan I have:
That’s basically the Alton Brown method. His technique calls for putting the bacon in a cold oven, setting it to 400. It takes a bit longer — about 30 minutes — for perfect bacon. Starting in a cold oven furnishes a much slower cook, which is key. I don’t know the science behind it, but it works. Best. Bacon. Ever.

Try the cold start technique at least once for a comparison.
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
Thanks and I will try that next time!
N.B.: He also calls for flipping the bacon about halfway through. Sorry, forgot to mention. I don't think his episodes are on youtube, (at least legally), but you might be able to track it down, at least in text form.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
N.B.: He also calls for flipping the bacon about halfway through. Sorry, forgot to mention. I don't think his episodes are on youtube, (at least legally), but you might be able to track it down, at least in text form.
I couldn't find a video but did find this, where he actually made the bacon by curing meat. The last step, number 4, describes how to cook it starting with a cold oven. I am using a rack so turning isn't necessary and it's not mentioned in the recipe.

 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
I couldn't find a video but did find this, where he actually made the bacon by curing meat. The last step, number 4, describes how to cook it starting with a cold oven. I am using a rack so turning isn't necessary and it's not mentioned in the recipe.

Ah - maybe turning it is something I made up. I too use a rack, but maybe I noticed that the bottom was a bit more "floppy" that the top was and flipping was an adaptation I made up. I tend to like moderation in my bacon crispiness factor. I like some crispiness, but I like the bulk of the fat to be not crispy. Whatever your taste in finished bacon, you should be able to achieve using the cold-start method and I promise you'll love it!

Edit to add: he must be fastidious in keeping his recipes off of the internet. I actually can't even find a text version of his method. I think all of his episodes are on Netflix, so if you have that, you may be able to track down there.
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
That’s basically the Alton Brown method. His technique calls for putting the bacon in a cold oven, setting it to 400. It takes a bit longer — about 30 minutes — for perfect bacon. Starting in a cold oven furnishes a much slower cook, which is key. I don’t know the science behind it, but it works. Best. Bacon. Ever.

Try the cold start technique at least once for a comparison.
My rule of thumb is never preheat an oven unless you are baking. Not necessary. Saves electricity. And, in the cold months, after using the oven, leave the door open. Helps heat the house. There is one exception. When you cook a roast for very few minutes at high heat, and then turn it off, and let roast sit for two hours. Don’t open the door. Perfect roast every time.
 
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TCROW

Well-Known Member
My rule of thumb is never preheat an oven unless you are baking. Not necessary. Saves electricity. And, in the cold months, after using the oven, leave the door open. Helps heat the house. There is one exception. When you cook a roast for very few minutes at high heat, and then turn it off, and let roast sit for two hours. Don’t open the door. Perfect roast every time.
You know, that's funny. When my wife and I got married many years ago, I noticed that she'd basically turn on the oven and throw whatever in to cook. I'd be like, "what are you doing? You know you've gotta let that thing preheat first. Otherwise your timing as far as when the food is cooked is going to be off!" I was very much a recipe follower to the T. Of course I lived on my own for several years before marriage and used my oven for off-season clothes storage, and I couldn't even tell you if I had a gas or electric stove!

Well, what the hell do I know? I've migrated to that same behavior over the years. And you're right: unless one is baking (where exact science is important), it really doesn't matter. Your food will get cooked, and as long as you know what you're looking for (how to check for doneness, etc.) you can manage it.
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
You know, that's funny. When my wife and I got married many years ago, I noticed that she'd basically turn on the oven and throw whatever in to cook. I'd be like, "what are you doing? You know you've gotta let that thing preheat first. Otherwise your timing as far as when the food is cooked is going to be off!" I was very much a recipe follower to the T. Of course I lived on my own for several years before marriage and used my oven for off-season clothes storage, and I couldn't even tell you if I had a gas or electric stove!

Well, what the hell do I know? I've migrated to that same behavior over the years. And you're right: unless one is baking (where exact science is important), it really doesn't matter. Your food will get cooked, and as long as you know what you're looking for (how to check for doneness, etc.) you can manage it.
...off season clothes storage...Thanks for the laugh.:lol: Happy cooking! 😄

Forgot to say that I love watching Alton Brown.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
Ah - maybe turning it is something I made up. I too use a rack, but maybe I noticed that the bottom was a bit more "floppy" that the top was and flipping was an adaptation I made up. I tend to like moderation in my bacon crispiness factor. I like some crispiness, but I like the bulk of the fat to be not crispy. Whatever your taste in finished bacon, you should be able to achieve using the cold-start method and I promise you'll love it!
I am a crispy bacon fan, but not burnt. Nothing like a peanut butter and bacon sammich with a cold glass of milk. :lol:

Edit to add: he must be fastidious in keeping his recipes off of the internet. I actually can't even find a text version of his method. I think all of his episodes are on Netflix, so if you have that, you may be able to track down there.
Nothing on Netflix, but most are available on the Food Network website: https://www.foodnetwork.com/ You need to log in via your service provider to be able to see them though.
 

NextJen

Raisin cane
PREMO Member
I am on the oven baked bandwagon now and will NEVER fry it again. :yahoo: Use a pan with a rack (I line the pan with foil for easy clean up) and space the slices evenly across the rack. Cook at 400 degrees for 15 minutes or your desired level of crispiness. Drain on paper towels. Eat. 😋

This is the pan I have:

Thanks for posting the pan that you have. I have put my bacon on a cookie sheet covered with foil to bake. When done baking I just transfer the bacon onto a plate with paper towels to sop up the grease. This pan would be much better!
 
You know, that's funny. When my wife and I got married many years ago, I noticed that she'd basically turn on the oven and throw whatever in to cook. I'd be like, "what are you doing? You know you've gotta let that thing preheat first. Otherwise your timing as far as when the food is cooked is going to be off!" I was very much a recipe follower to the T. Of course I lived on my own for several years before marriage and used my oven for off-season clothes storage, and I couldn't even tell you if I had a gas or electric stove!

Well, what the hell do I know? I've migrated to that same behavior over the years. And you're right: unless one is baking (where exact science is important), it really doesn't matter. Your food will get cooked, and as long as you know what you're looking for (how to check for doneness, etc.) you can manage it.
As a rule, I do this too, just throw it in while it's pre-heating. There are some things that you just can't do that. Like pizza, especially if you're reheating it. Get the oven hot with the pan/stone, THEN put the pizza in. If you don't do it this way, you get a soggy crust.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
Thanks for posting the pan that you have. I have put my bacon on a cookie sheet covered with foil to bake. When done baking I just transfer the bacon onto a plate with paper towels to sop up the grease. This pan would be much better!
You're welcome. It makes a different when you cook the bacon on a rack. I got it at Walmart.

 

lucky_bee

RBF expert
PREMO Member
I forget who turned me on to baking my bacon, but ever since it's my usual go to. If I'm making bacon anyways, it's usually accompanied by a bunch of other stuff I'm busy with on the stove. So it's nice to just throw it in there and continue on with my eggs or waffles or hollandaise sauce 😋 we make a lot of bacon in my house. I typically just cover a baking sheet in foil and spread them out. Sometimes, I'll use a rack insert but it's all the same to me. Sometimes I flip, sometimes I forget. It's always good.


My husband likes to use his microwave bacon pan :strangle: he's impatient which is why I cook 95% of the time. It's hard to ruin bacon, yet he's found a way.
 
I've been getting the pre-cooked bacon. I can keep it on the shelf in the cupboard and it never goes bad. Literally 5 minutes on a hot griddle to the desired doneness, usually just shy of crispy. I use a paper towel and dab the bacon while it's on the griddle, that sops up the little bit of grease so the bacon isn't at all wet or greasy. Always comes out perfect, and you get that griddle-fried flavor you don't get in an oven. A quick wipe with aother paper towel and cleanup is done. Microwaving ANY meat is a sin.
 

TCROW

Well-Known Member
I've been getting the pre-cooked bacon. I can keep it on the shelf in the cupboard and it never goes bad. Literally 5 minutes on a hot griddle to the desired doneness, usually just shy of crispy. I use a paper towel and dab the bacon while it's on the griddle, that sops up the little bit of grease so the bacon isn't at all wet or greasy. Always comes out perfect, and you get that griddle-fried flavor you don't get in an oven. A quick wipe with aother paper towel and cleanup is done. Microwaving ANY meat is a sin.
Perhaps it varies by brand but I find the pre-cooked bacon is generally sliced too thinly. It’s generally OK if I need it for another recipe, like crumbled bacon for a quiche or something. But if it’s for a sandwich or bacon on the side, I generally like it thick cut.
 
Perhaps it varies by brand but I find the pre-cooked bacon is generally sliced too thinly. It’s generally OK if I need it for another recipe, like crumbled bacon for a quiche or something. But if it’s for a sandwich or bacon on the side, I generally like it thick cut.
Have to agree with you there, it is thin. I just add more slices to the sandwich.... :biggrin:
 

lucky_bee

RBF expert
PREMO Member
I've been getting the pre-cooked bacon. I can keep it on the shelf in the cupboard and it never goes bad. Literally 5 minutes on a hot griddle to the desired doneness, usually just shy of crispy. I use a paper towel and dab the bacon while it's on the griddle, that sops up the little bit of grease so the bacon isn't at all wet or greasy. Always comes out perfect, and you get that griddle-fried flavor you don't get in an oven. A quick wipe with aother paper towel and cleanup is done. Microwaving ANY meat is a sin.
when I lived on my own, bacon was one of those things I'd buy a pack of and portion out in small freezer bags. Quick defrost of 4 slices and I'd have the real deal. The pre-cooked stuff is still too chewy for me.
 
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