Matt Gaetz

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
2. It's not opinion when they allege a specific act.


Ok the fight is ongoing ...... I remembered the claim, not the correct outcome.



The Times is being sued because of how it characterized two Veritas videos, which ran last September and alleged voter fraud in Minneapolis. Astor’s story, as quoted in the suit, called a Veritas video “deceptive” and said O’Keefe and his colleagues have “a long history of releasing manipulated or selectively edited footage.” Astor noted that Veritas released its first video just hours after a big Times scoop about Donald Trump’s tax returns, and she quoted an academic research group saying that a series of Veritas-promoting tweets by Trump and others resembled “a coordinated disinformation campaign.”

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The Times, in its response to the lawsuit, argued that Astor and another defendant, reporter Tiffany Hsu, were either telling readers the truth or were putting “unverifiable expressions of opinion” into their news stories.

That last bit is a handy term among media lawyers, the idea being that since most opinions can’t be proved true or false, they can’t serve as the basis of a defamation suit. As Times spokeswoman Danielle Rhoades Ha told me, “the term ‘opinion’ has a special meaning in defamation law, one that differs from the common understanding of the term,” adding that it refers to “descriptive statements [that] help readers understand the significance of the news.” In that sense, you could say that the Times is portraying “opinion” as something closer to analysis or color—like when a sportswriter says a ballgame was played on a “beautiful” day rather than reporting it was 74 degrees, or describes the shortstop as “clumsy” instead of noting he made three errors.

If that was the distinction, it was lost on the justice in the case, Charles D. Wood, who was elected to a fourteen-year term as a Republican in 2009. Wood noted Veritas’s argument that “a reasonable reader would expect a news reporter’s statements to be assertions of fact and not opinion.” He added, “If a writer interjects an opinion in a news article (and will seek to claim legal protections as opinion) it stands to reason that the writer should have an obligation to alert the reader.”

By framing his decision that way, Wood highlighted the key irony of the case: a court is pointing to Project Veritas as a possible victim of unethical journalistic conduct. Meanwhile, the New York Times must counter the blowback that comes from arguing that its reporters put “opinion,” however it’s defined, into its news stories.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

Prosecutors recommend not charging Gaetz in sex-trafficking case, citing witness credibility: report


The female at the center of the case has been a central witness in the investigation. But people familiar with the case said she is one of two people whose testimony has issues that veteran prosecutors think would be unacceptable to a jury.

The other witness is former Gaetz friend Joel Greenberg, an-ex tax collector for Florida's Seminole County who pleaded guilty last year to sex trafficking of a minor and other crimes as part of a cooperation deal with authorities, the newspaper also reports.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member

NYT Painted Matt Gaetz as a Child Sex Trafficker. One Year Later, He Has Not Been Charged.



On March 30 of last year, The New York Times published an article that was treated as a bombshell by the political class. Citing exclusively anonymous sources — “three people briefed on the matter” — the Paper of Record announced that Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) “is being investigated by the Justice Department over whether he had a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old and paid for her to travel with him.”

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From the start, the GOP Congressman vehemently denied these accusations. And he went further than mere denials: he claimed that these allegations arose as part of a blackmail and extortion scheme to extract $25 million from his family in exchange for not publicizing these accusations, which his father promptly reported to the FBI. While many scoffed at Gaetz's story as fantastical and bizarre, that part of his story was vindicated last August when a Florida developer and convicted felon “was arrested on a charge that he tried to extort $25 million from the father of Rep. Matt Gaetz in exchange for a presidential pardon that would shut down a high-profile, criminal sex-trafficking investigation into the Republican congressman.” In November, that developer, Stephen Alford, pled guilty to trying to extort $25 million from Rep. Gaetz and his family.

In other words, the only component of this story that has thus far been confirmed — a full year after the NYT first trumpeted it — is the part of Gaetz's denial where he insisted that all this arose from an extortion attempt. Yet none of that mattered, and it still does not matter. As I wrote in the aftermath of the Timesstory, designed to warn of the perils of assuming someone's guilt without any due process: “That Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) is a pedophile, a sex trafficker, and an abuser of women who forces them to prostitute themselves and use drugs with him is a widespread assumption in many media and political circles.” CNN celebrated the fact that one of Gaetz's arch political enemies — the liberal icon Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) — said that “as the mother of daughters, the charges certainly are sickening.”

In sum, Matt Gaetz has now spent a full year with millions of people believing he is guilty of pedophilia and sex trafficking even though he has never had the opportunity to confront witnesses, evaluate evidence or contest his guilt in a court of law because he has never been charged. Instead, he has been found guilty by media-led mob justice, all from unethical and possibly illegal leaks by “people briefed on the matter.” As a result, not only did Gaetz become radioactive due to crimes that have never been proven, but so too did anyone who argued that he is entitled to due process before being assumed guilty. For writing that April article and producing an accompanying video advocating the need for due process before assuming someone's guilt, I spent two days trending on Twitter due to widespread accusations that, like Gaetz, I too must be a pedophile who was only defending him because I am guilty of the same crimes. That is the core evil of mob justice: it triggers the worst instincts in mob participants, who become drunk with righteous rage and bereft of reason.
I want to know why Gaetz hasn't sued the NY Slime into infinity (and beyond).
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
The other witness is former Gaetz friend Joel Greenberg, an-ex tax collector for Florida's Seminole County who pleaded guilty last year to sex trafficking of a minor and other crimes as part of a cooperation deal with authorities, the newspaper also reports.
Yeah, THERE'S a credible witness. It's looking more like spite and less like truth.

Edited to Add: Wow, the Wiki page on this guy - what a tool. Hard to believe the NYT was doing anything but muckraking, because I wouldn't believe this guy if he gave me the time.
 

Bushy23

Active Member
Gaetz sent two Venmo transactions amounting to $900 to accused sex trafficker Joel Greenberg in May 2018. He labeled the first transaction “test” and the second transaction “hit up _____,” with the alleged nickname of a young woman.

Greenberg later sent money to three girls labeled as “Tuition,” “School” and “School” that totaled $900.
 

phreddyp

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
Gaetz sent two Venmo transactions amounting to $900 to accused sex trafficker Joel Greenberg in May 2018. He labeled the first transaction “test” and the second transaction “hit up _____,” with the alleged nickname of a young woman.

Greenberg later sent money to three girls labeled as “Tuition,” “School” and “School” that totaled $900.
And your point?
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
So this looks like three separate issues.

The paper clearly jumping the gun painting a picture of guilt before evidence. A real life extortion attempt on Gaetz. And suspicious behaviour by Gaetz that could most easily be explained by him being exactly what is claimed in the article.

Here's the thing about extortion, it works better if the person you are extorting is both guilty and motivated to make sure their guilt remains undisclosed.

And given my general opinion of the children of wealthy politicians (which Gaetz certainly is) im inclined to believe this guy is scummy. But I'll wait until I see pictures of him with Epstein before completely writing him off.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
Aw, look at that! Ain't it cute? One lies, the other claps like a trained seal.

Screenshot 2022-09-28 at 03-50-58 Matt Gaetz.png
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
When word came out that prosecutors might be stepping away from the prospect of prosecuting Rep. Matt Gaetz for alleged sex trafficking charges, there was a noted groan across the media landscape. It has been two years of this supposition-based story, and it appears that with little movement at all on the case, it may be coming to a close.

Among the hardest hit appears to be Ryan Cooper of The Prospect, who seems to think there should be more action taken against Gaetz. That Cooper has long railed against fascism on his account, it is amusing to see him take this stance on the matter.




 
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