Minneapolis Cop kneels on man's neck; man dies

Hank

my war
It is a travesty that someone died. My point is why are these the only ones you see. Rile up the masses, get viewers eyes watching. Good for the ad people. The media gets weeks of good ratings off this. I'm faulting their BS.
Are all of them caught on a cellphone in broad daylight?
 

black dog

Free America
For purely informational purposes - the human vocal cords will not function unless air is passed over them. In other words, if you are not breathing the vocal cords will make no sound. Also, if you are saying "I can't breath", you are, in fact, breathing. Now, when pressure is applied to your throat it is very uncomfortable, but if you can speak, you can breath.
Buzzzzzzzzzz, Wrong.


The lungs have what are called "Volumes" and "Capacities". For our purposes, you need to understand these two phrases: Functional Reserve Capacity (the amount of air left in the lungs after a normal exhalation) and Expiratory Reserve Volume (the amount of air you can still force out of your lungs after a normal exhalation).
When you take a normal breath you breathe in and out you are breathing about 500ml of air. After breathing out, you are left with ~2400ml of air inside your lungs, this is the Functional Reserve Capacity. If you try to force out as much air as possible, you can still force out ~1200ml more air. This is the Expiratory Reserve Volume. This is air you are able to speak with even if you cannot take a normal breath. Important Note: Notice that the Expiratory Reserve Volume is more than twice the size of a normal breath. That is a lot of air you are able to force out, and a lot of speaking you can do even if you can't breathe.
The lungs work on negative pressure. So, your lungs, when you breathe in, are at a lower pressure than the outside air. This draws the air into them. This is caused by your diaphragm and intercostal muscles. Your lungs are very elastic, and will move back to their normal size during exhalation. This is where the problem begins for officers. If you are kneeling on a suspect, or you have them handcuffed on the ground so that they are on their chest, there is a strong possibility that you can cut off their ability to breathe. Once the lungs begin to exhale, they collapse, but if you they are being pressed down on by body weight, they may not be able to re-expand. They then continue to collapse, forcing out the Functional Reserve Capacity of air, but not drawing in a new breath. So, your suspect may be pleading for breath, they may actually be incapable of drawing one in, and the reason is you. If someone is saying they cannot breathe, you need to believe them, because you might be killing them. Furthermore, during any kind of physical altercation, that person may be breathing deeply and rapidly, making their lungs collapse faster when you are kneeling on them or holding them on the ground.
Asthma. Some of you may be saying "Well, the guy who died in LAPD's care had asthma, that wasn't the officer's fault or the jail's fault." Oh yes it was. If someone is telling you they have asthma and they can't breathe, you need to believe them. Asthma is a constriction of the airways, no different than being strangled. They will still be able to speak and they will still be dying slowly. It took 30 minutes for that man to die, and that was entirely preventable.
 
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my-thyme

..if momma ain't happy...
Patron
Let's be honest, Vrai. No one is going to say anything that will remotely change your mind. You can act like it, but when you craft the narrative as you are, you clearly aren't interested in any meaningful debate. You don't want to hear another side, you only want people to agree with you.

You can come on here and bitch all day about fascists and media manipulation, but fail to see you being manipulated by the very folks tasked with enforcing the fascist Governor's orders. They are willing to beat people for not wearing masks and you act like this is some random story we haven't heard before.

You allow yourself to be manipulated because every time something like this happens, the police come out and say "well, the guy was a criminal" as if that somehow justifies their actions, and you eat it up. "I don't care if some criminal gets killed!" while ignoring the systemic problems these incidents highlight. The mindset that "everyone we encounter is a potential killer" is what got that Australian woman killed. The "reach for your gun first" reaction to being scared is what got that woman killed. Those mindsets are ingrained into police officer's heads from Day 1. Anyone could be out to kill you. While true, stats show it's not the case and the vast majority, despite what you think, of the people they come in contact with do not want to harm them, but feel they must be polite or risk getting the crap beat out of them, or a ticket, or some other retribution. None of that is based on law. That's driven by ego and there is nothing in our justice system that appears to be in place to prevent negligent behavior justified by a carefully-worded press release and taxpayer-funded lawyers.
Yes, polite. Taught all my boys, you get pulled over, hands stay on the wheel, yes sir, no sir. No disrespect, no being a know-it-all. They say sit, stand, walk this line, blow in this tube, you do it.

Have one idiot son who has been to county lock up a couple times. Any time I would go to the detention center, court, wherever, "That is the nicest, most intelligent young man we have here." Does stupid things that get him in trouble, but polite, which keeps him from getting in MORE trouble.
 

Will99

Active Member
I'm sure the dept. will sat it was lack of training of some other stupid chit, but this is the result of ego and chain of command. The officer was not about to listen to some member of the public about police work. Remember, we rubes/civilians don't know what it's like to be an officer so we have no room to pass judgement, criticize, or offer any sort of thought into their actions.
I thought the chief fired all of the cops?
 

Will99

Active Member
Let's be honest, Vrai. No one is going to say anything that will remotely change your mind. You can act like it, but when you craft the narrative as you are, you clearly aren't interested in any meaningful debate. You don't want to hear another side, you only want people to agree with you.

You can come on here and bitch all day about fascists and media manipulation, but fail to see you being manipulated by the very folks tasked with enforcing the fascist Governor's orders. They are willing to beat people for not wearing masks and you act like this is some random story we haven't heard before.

You allow yourself to be manipulated because every time something like this happens, the police come out and say "well, the guy was a criminal" as if that somehow justifies their actions, and you eat it up. "I don't care if some criminal gets killed!" while ignoring the systemic problems these incidents highlight. The mindset that "everyone we encounter is a potential killer" is what got that Australian woman killed. The "reach for your gun first" reaction to being scared is what got that woman killed. Those mindsets are ingrained into police officer's heads from Day 1. Anyone could be out to kill you. While true, stats show it's not the case and the vast majority, despite what you think, of the people they come in contact with do not want to harm them, but feel they mus the polite or risk getting the crap beat out of them, or a ticket, or some other retribution. None of that is based on law. That's driven by ego and there is nothing in our justice system that appears to be in place to prevent negligent behavior justified by a carefully-worded press release and taxpayer-funded lawyers.
Weren't you on the cops did something wrong in Freddy Gray?
 

WingsOfGold

Well-Known Member
I'd like to know what went down before this happened. He was a forger I think.... IOW a theif which I don't usually have much sympathy for but the force was excessive once he was cuffed and down and appearently no longer resisting.
 

Chris0nllyn

Well-Known Member
I used to do that but not anymore. Reaching into your glove box may bring a cop with a gun pointed at you.
And this is okay? That the police in our country of "freedom" are so scared by the incredibly statistically unlikely event that you can't even reach into the place where 95% of the population keeps a document that will be asked for without fear of being shot. That's okay with you?
 

DaSDGuy

Well-Known Member
Ok. And he stopped speaking/breathing.... The cop stayed on him for a good 5 or more minutes after his last words.... So what's your point? Not to mention it looked like the murdering cop was enjoying it.
Point being informational purposes, as I stated. Yo comprende "informational purposes"?
 

WingsOfGold

Well-Known Member
And this is okay? That the police in our country of "freedom" are so scared by the incredibly statistically unlikely event that you can't even reach into the place where 95% of the population keeps a document that will be asked for without fear of being shot. That's okay with you?
Cops have a dangerous job, play by the rules or have a very bad day. AMF nobody will miss you.


At what point is it ok with you for a cop to exterminate an animal?
 
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SkylarkTempest

Active Member
Explain something to me:

6,700 people die in this country, on average, every day. Why do you care about this one single guy? What is so important about him that he is all over the news, being argued about all over the internet, and millions of Americans know his situation?

That's a real question, and I am interested in your answer: why is this guy getting so much ink when 6,699 other people died that day and we'll never hear a word about them? Why do so many care about this man, when any number of beloved grandmothers died on the same day and you're all like, yeah, **** her?
Because police sometimes abuse their power. This is a case where that abuse resulted in unnecessary death, and it's an unusually callous episode. This wasn't caused by a wrong decision made in the heat of the moment, or a result of confused circumstances. There's no nuance here, just a pure lack of empathy and human decency. I just don't understand why the fatal consequence of an officer's inhumanity isn't news to you.
 

SkylarkTempest

Active Member
Because in this country we are innocent until we are proven guilty, thats why....

Lets see what the autopsy says for starters...

My prediction is,,,,,
I will predict that excited delirium and positional asphyxiation are going to be hot topics in Minneapolis for awhile. This is not new information. You don't hold people down on their stomachs. Once control has been established, you sit them up or lay them on their side. This guy was obviously not fighting any longer, and I can't think of any valid reason I would accept as to why he still needed to be held down, why he was not put into the "recovery position" or into a seated position, and how many different ways they violated their own training and procedures. I don't know, but I bet that's also the reason for the swift firing. Failure to follow procedures, not a criminal act (although that doesn't preclude criminal charges as more information comes to light).
All good points.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
Weeping asses off? See, again, nobody is wailing and rending and tearing. We are pointing out that officers job is to restrain and deliver to the system a breathing suspect. Not to kill him because he's stubborn. Officers are granted powers, and they accept the responsibility to not abuse that power. Here, they did. Read this.......


http://www.unprecedentedmediocrity.com/i-love-my-brothers-in-blue-but-i-get-to-have-expectations-of-you/?fbclid=IwAR1ZMFsdxquR_u5MEdH5Kf4fP9zvGEutAvvxy7Wg4LPoCyFBJLAIrpb8VMo
Thanks for posting. I wasn't happy about his use of deliberately inflammatory language (that cop murdered....), but all-in-all, good piece.
 
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