Muhammad makes list of 10 most popular baby names in the US for the first time

Kyle

Just being a fly in the ointment...
PREMO Member
According to BabyCenter's list of 100 most popular baby names for girls and boys in America, Sophia is still at the top for girls while Liam is the No.1 boy's name.

Although the nation's favorite monikers have more or less remained the same since 2018, there has been a rise in Arabic names in 2019.

This year, Muhammad and Aaliyah have replaced Mason and Layla placing tenth on the coveted list.

In 2018 and 2017, Muhammad came in at No.14 on BabyCenter's list with a 29 percent jump in popularity this year.


 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I'm skeptical. I just went through the SS database state by state looking over the top 100 in each. I can't figure out how they got their answer.
If Muhammad or any variation thereof appeared AT ALL, it was very low. So I am doubtful that an aggregate version of the data would break the top 10.
 

jazz lady

~*~ Cluck Club ~*~
PREMO Member
I was watching Jeopardy recently and one of the contestant's name was Mohammad...last name Ali. No joke! :lol:
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Maybe in Dearborn, MI.
That's why I am skeptical. If you check Michigan, Mohammed - or any variant spelling of the name - doesn't crack the top 100.
The 10th spot has 376 named "Jackson" - the 100th has 118 named "Ryker". For Muhammed or any variation to make it high on the list,
there would have to be SEVERAL versions of that name JUST BELOW the 100 threshold - and I find that unlikely. Not impossible - just unlikely.

What I find MORE likely is that the name list is based on "trends" - or they are getting very creative with similar names.
 

MiddleGround

Well-Known Member
Maybe it was used cross gender? There was a time in the early 2000s when just about every girl's name HAD to have a "Y" in it.

Did you try Mohammyd or Muhammyd?
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
Maybe it was used cross gender? There was a time in the early 2000s when just about every girl's name HAD to have a "Y" in it.

Did you try Mohammyd or Muhammyd?
I'm guessing it might be a LOT of variations - like Mohammed, Mahmoud, Mahmud, Mahmut, Mehmud, Mehmood, Muhammad, Muhammadu - it's huge.

But I suspect if they applied the same metric to - say, John - and included, Ivan, Jon, Jonny, Jonathan, Shawn, Sean, Juan, Johann, Hans, Ian, Jonas, Jan, Jean, Giovanni, Jack- then "JOHN" would win it.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
I'm skeptical. I just went through the SS database state by state looking over the top 100 in each. I can't figure out how they got their answer.
If Muhammad or any variation thereof appeared AT ALL, it was very low. So I am doubtful that an aggregate version of the data would break the top 10.
I trust your survey much more than the Baby Center's.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I trust your survey much more than the Baby Center's.
I don't think they had an "agenda" - I don't think they were out to prove anything. I just think they thought that making a difference in a name like "Mohammed" wasn't that big a deal, so they counted various spellings - but I doubt they did it for other names. Elizabeth is also Liz, Beth, Lisa, Liza, Betty, Betsy, Bette, Libby and so on. I'll bet they considered THEM separate.
 

RoseRed

American Beauty
PREMO Member
I miss my K-Tel albums! :bawl:
Well looky here! :lol:

 
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