New York Times wasn't always so suspicious of 'secretive communications' with Russia

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
But the Times was much more generous in describing what you might otherwise call “secretive communications” with Russia when Barack Obama was president. In 2012, during his re-election campaign, Obama was caught by a hot mic whispering to then-President Dmitry Medvedev that he was potentially willing to roll back missile defense initiatives in Europe, something the Russians wanted very much, but not until the 2012 election, the last chance for voters to hold Obama accountable, was over.

“On all these issues, but particularly missile defense, this can be solved, but it’s important for him to give me space,” Obama told Medvedev, referring to Putin, who would be taking Medvedev’s place in two months. “This is my last election,” Obama continued. “After my election I have more flexibility.”

Unlike Trump’s meeting with Putin, which Tillerson witnessed, Obama’s conversation about his explicit willingness to bow to Russian interests wasn’t supposed to be heard by anyone at all. And yet a Times news story charitably described the exchange as “a private moment of candor.”

Two days after the Times reported on Obama’s hot-mic comments, the paper’s editorial board excoriated and mocked Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney for labeling Russia as the U.S.’s “No. 1 geopolitical foe.”




New York Times wasn't always so suspicious of 'secretive communications' with Russia
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
But the Times was much more generous in describing what you might otherwise call “secretive communications” with Russia when Barack Obama was president. In 2012, during his re-election campaign, Obama was caught by a hot mic whispering to then-President Dmitry Medvedev that he was potentially willing to roll back missile defense initiatives in Europe, something the Russians wanted very much, but not until the 2012 election, the last chance for voters to hold Obama accountable, was over.

“On all these issues, but particularly missile defense, this can be solved, but it’s important for him to give me space,” Obama told Medvedev, referring to Putin, who would be taking Medvedev’s place in two months. “This is my last election,” Obama continued. “After my election I have more flexibility.”

Unlike Trump’s meeting with Putin, which Tillerson witnessed, Obama’s conversation about his explicit willingness to bow to Russian interests wasn’t supposed to be heard by anyone at all. And yet a Times news story charitably described the exchange as “a private moment of candor.”

Two days after the Times reported on Obama’s hot-mic comments, the paper’s editorial board excoriated and mocked Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney for labeling Russia as the U.S.’s “No. 1 geopolitical foe.”




New York Times wasn't always so suspicious of 'secretive communications' with Russia
A propaganda agency-exploiter for the Democrat party.
 

Manny

New Member
The lamestream media was the equivalent of state-run with Obama. Whether they agreed with him or feared being labeled racist for challenging him, they shamed their profession in the process.
 
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