Nitrogen Fill Up

JeJeTe

Happiness
I have nitrogen in my tires and I got a low tire pressure warning this morning. I'm assuming due to the extreme temps. I was trying to avoid going back to the dealer because of the wait so does anyone know if there is a nitrogen fill up spot in St. Mary's?
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
I have nitrogen in my tires and I got a low tire pressure warning this morning. I'm assuming due to the extreme temps. I was trying to avoid going back to the dealer because of the wait so does anyone know if there is a nitrogen fill up spot in St. Mary's?
Try calling Southern Tire, I recall reading somewhere that they did provide nitrogen. 301-862-4024
 

glhs837

Power with Control
None here in St Marys that I'm aware of, but dont sweat it. Really,unless the air you put in your tires is done from a compressor that has no moisture removing capabilities at all, which very few do, the difference is going to range from insignificant to be immeasurable. Really, as a car guy plugged into a few forums with tens of thousands of members, whose expereince range is from college chemistry and physics professors to race car drivers, and industrial process engineers. I have been looking at this for years, and the result of all that research is that for everyday car use, nitrogen serves no useful function. One of our Chargerforum members actually did a real time comparison between air and nitrogen in two each of his tires (our cars report real time pressure data on each wheel) and saw no difference.

1. Gases under pressure behave the same over temp changes, given equal moisture amounts.
2. No tire ever in normal usage has failed due to internal exposure to air, of course the outside, with the extra breakdown cause by UV would fail first
3. Corrosion of the wheels? Really? Having taken the tires of of steel wheels that were from the 80s, I can tell you, worrying about corrosion of the inside of a wheel is just silly.

Nitrogen fill is a snake oil solution to problems that don't affect everyday motorists.

So just swing by Sheetz or WaWa and use the machine there.
 

JeJeTe

Happiness
Try calling Southern Tire, I recall reading somewhere that they did provide nitrogen. 301-862-4024
Thanks!


None here in St Marys that I'm aware of, but dont sweat it. Really,unless the air you put in your tires is done from a compressor that has no moisture removing capabilities at all, which very few do, the difference is going to range from insignificant to be immeasurable. Really, as a car guy plugged into a few forums with tens of thousands of members, whose expereince range is from college chemistry and physics professors to race car drivers, and industrial process engineers. I have been looking at this for years, and the result of all that research is that for everyday car use, nitrogen serves no useful function. One of our Chargerforum members actually did a real time comparison between air and nitrogen in two each of his tires (our cars report real time pressure data on each wheel) and saw no difference.

1. Gases under pressure behave the same over temp changes, given equal moisture amounts.
2. No tire ever in normal usage has failed due to internal exposure to air, of course the outside, with the extra breakdown cause by UV would fail first
3. Corrosion of the wheels? Really? Having taken the tires of of steel wheels that were from the 80s, I can tell you, worrying about corrosion of the inside of a wheel is just silly.

Nitrogen fill is a snake oil solution to problems that don't affect everyday motorists.

So just swing by Sheetz or WaWa and use the machine there.
Thanks! This was offered free as an extra when I bought the car so I figured why not since I hate having to deal with tire pressure fluctuations in the winter. I've the car for a year and this the first time I've had it flagged as a pressure isse. So if regular air won't affect the existing nitrogen then I'll just take your advice.
 

JeJeTe

Happiness
That's what I have been wondering. I talked to my mechanic about this a few weeks ago. I asked him his opinion on the nitro tires. He cracked up laughing and said "they ain't worth a shiat". :lol:
:lol: It was free so I went with it. And I haven't had a problem with pressure until today and last winter had some cold days too. So beats me :shrug:
 

glhs837

Power with Control
Don't mock, folks just don't know. And it doesn't hurt, for free, it doesn't hurt anything. To pay that would be a rip off. And spending time driving to find it, that would be time wasted. If you set your pressure a few high in the summer when they are hot, you could go a ways before seeing a warning. My car, it's supposed to 32, warning comes on at 24, I think. Goes back off at 27. Figure 1psi peer 10 degrees in temp
 
There was an experiment I watched some guy do regarding nitrogen in tires. His final conclusion was unless the place you got the tires filled had a setup equivalent to what the F1 racers use (highly unlikely) then you were wasting your money. What is offered to the general public just isn't pure enough for the desired effect. He actually found the tire pressure had a greater variance over standard air filled tires when put on the track which was quite surprising. I got pulled into that rip-off once and was shocked when my pressure dropped just as you were because that was the whole sell point.
 

glhs837

Power with Control
It's no worse than air, for sure, so if it's free and easy, why not. But not for any money and if you have to go out of your way, then it's not worth it.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
I'll sell you some 78% pure nitrogen.
LMAO!..


That whole nitrogen scam drives me nuts. So many people taken in by it... When the scam first hit the streets, I did the gas law calcs simply comparing air (78% nitrogen) with pure nitrogen (assuming you could somehow get to that level in a tire..you can't) and the difference in pressure variation, between the two, over something like 150 degrees Fahrenheit worked out to be something on the order of 0.2 PSI...or as previously noted, impossible to discern.

It's very easy to understand why the pressure in tires filled with air varies the same with temperature as tires filled with pure nitrogen..when you just stop and think about the simple fact that air is already almost 80% nitrogen to start with.
 
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glhs837

Power with Control
Dont forget the other "benefits", Gilligan :) The N2 molecule is larger, and wont permeate out through the rubber quite as fast. :) Of course, if you adjust your tire pressures bi-annually as you should anyway, you will never see that in reality. FIGHTER jets use this stuff, man!!!! Fleet operators like FEDEX use it in trucks. Must be good stuff :)
 
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