No signs of alien life in closest 1,300 stars

Kyle

Just being a fly in the ointment...
PREMO Member
Study says: 'We are left with zero candidates'

We phoned E.T., but it just rang and rang.

A comprehensive study from a number of organizations, including one funded by Russian billionaire Yuri Milner, found no evidence of extraterrestrial life among more than 1,300 stars in close proximity to Earth, a hunt that spanned more than 3 years.

"After excluding events with characteristics consistent with terrestrial radio interference, we are left with zero candidates," the study reads.


 
But the radio signals we (might) receive now are from systems millions of light years away. Look at out own planet, were we capable of sending/receiving radio signals millions of years ago? If you believe life elsewhere developed parallel to our own, plus or minus a million years, any signals they send haven't gotten to us yet. So "no sign" doesn't mean "no life".
 

jrt_ms1995

Well-Known Member
But the radio signals we (might) receive now are from systems millions of light years away. Look at out own planet, were we capable of sending/receiving radio signals millions of years ago? If you believe life elsewhere developed parallel to our own, plus or minus a million years, any signals they send haven't gotten to us yet. So "no sign" doesn't mean "no life".
Not quite; only signals from star systems millions of light years away would be millions of years old when we receive them. Basically, distance equals age. A signal from Proxima Centauri received today would only be a little over 4 years old. I think that's what you meant in your first sentence but the wording confused me. Agree with everything else. We've only been broadcasting radio waves for, what, 125 years? That's not very far (or long) in the universe; any signal of ours wouldn't have reached more than about 500 other (G-type) stars yet.
 
Not quite; only signals from star systems millions of light years away would be millions of years old when we receive them. Basically, distance equals age. A signal from Proxima Centauri received today would only be a little over 4 years old. I think that's what you meant in your first sentence but the wording confused me. Agree with everything else. We've only been broadcasting radio waves for, what, 125 years? That's not very far (or long) in the universe; any signal of ours wouldn't have reached more than about 500 other (G-type) stars yet.
You're right, there are systems much closer than I was indicating. I was thinking very deep space probing.
 
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