Obamacare going down in flames...

For over 30 years, I was able to purchase very good health care thru my employer. It was a bit expensive, but worth every penny when I had hospital stays and surgeries. I had access to the same med program after I retired. Then came Obamacare. My retiree program changed radically, and was for all intents no different than one of the purchased marketplace offerings, just subsidized. It was less expensive, but not nearly as encompassing with a much higher deductible.

In a few years I will turn 65. At that time, I will be no longer eligible for the retiree program and will be directed to a sub-set of company recommended marketplace offerings (assuming what we know today still holds...) as a supplemental to my new Medicare enlistment. I know this because I had to assist my father in making marketplace selections when the company (we both retired fro the same company) rescinded it's retiree offerings under Obamacare.

Now with insurance carriers pulling out of the Marketplace, things are not looking good for future medical support. So much can happen between now and 2019. Obamacare may collapse. A new, yet unknown, administration may change things completely once again. Unknown costs. Unknown coverage.

As a relatively young person, I can attempt to deal with it. I feel for the elderly, like my parents. This crap goes right over their heads. I'm around to help them thru it as I have been before, but those that are alone, have no one to explain it to them, can't operate a computer which is now practically mandatory for doing anything... and one day I will be one of those octogenarian or nonagenarians in the same boat my folks and their friends are now, totally confused and upset. Because I live alone and have no children, I cannot depend on any family help as I age. Very discouraging future.

Ok, time for another :coffee: and finish plans to visit the folks later this week.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
The article seems to favor the opinion that this is a retaliatory action against the administrations rejection of their merger with Humana. But then goes on to say they had 900k enrollees in April. While people are often irrational and might cut off their nose to spite their face, if the exchange were truly profitable there is no way they would be pulling out of so many markets. Money trumps feelings on a corporate level, and I have to imagine medical insurance companies have a lot of experience making those types of decisions (and money always wins).

It's been said a million times, by the insurers and pundits and all, these exchanges will only work if they can get a similar mix of healthy to sick people as the general population. Unfortunately, people who are chronically sick are on average more likely to be out of work/poor and as such more likely to use the exchange.

So the legislature needs to #### or get off the pot. Either universal healthcare from a single provider, getting rid of any issues of healthy vs sick disparity, or completely exit the market and let healthcare function as an actual business with real competition.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
if the exchange were truly profitable there is no way they would be pulling out of so many markets.
A lot of companies are bailing out of the exchanges (and even completely out of certain states altogether) or have already done so. This just happens to be one of the largest actions so far.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
I was designed this way, once there are enough carriers pulled out it can be nationalized. It's called the back door plan to single payer health care.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I was designed this way, once there are enough carriers pulled out it can be nationalized. It's called the back door plan to single payer health care.
Just like that. Anyone who didn't see this coming is a moron.
 

Lurk

Happy Creepy Ass Cracka
Just like that. Anyone who didn't see this coming is a moron.
Provision for this situation was written into the law in the days following when Nancy Pelosi 'deemed' the law passed by the House (without a vote).
 

racingal

Member
And because of Obama Care I now have to purchase very expensive coverage thru my employer. I have good insurance with my husband's federal govt position. That is not good enough I guess so they want me to go broke just paying for healthcare.
 
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Clem72

Well-Known Member
And because of Obama Care I know have to purchase very expensive coverage thru my employer. I have good insurance with my husband's federal govt position. That is not good enough I guess so they want me to go broke just paying for healthcare.
Sounds like your employer is jerkin your chain. Plenty of govvies with working spouses who don't need to double-dip on insurance. Can't imagine why your situation would be different.
 

racingal

Member
I am doing my research...I can't see how they can make is mandatory to take their insurance.
If anyone can point me in the right direction that would be great!!
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
To the best of my knowledge, unless you live in MA the only one "requiring" you to get insurance coverage is the IRS. So all you have to do is check the box on your taxes that says you were covered all year.

If you need proof, your husband should receive a IRS Forms 1095-C, and on line 14 you should see a 1E* verifying that your husband and all his dependents/spouse were covered.

*1E. Minimum essential coverage providing minimum value offered to employee and at least minimum essential coverage offered to dependent(s) and spouse.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
There is no way an insurance company that is forced to take on people with previous known illness's can exist.

Should these people be insurable? Yes, but in order to insure them they have to raise the rates on everyone.

I remember when Maryland auto insurances had assigned risk policies for automobiles.
Perhaps that would be the better plan for people with previous conditions.
All insurance companies would pay into the assigned risk company to help defray the costs.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Aetna decision exposes weaknesses in Obama’s health-care law



Aetna’s announcement Monday night was the latest sign that large insurers are losing money in the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces, heightening concerns about the long-term stability of a key part of Obama’s domestic policy legacy. But addressing this issue could open the door to a nasty political fight, given that some Republicans have vowed to repeal the law outright.

If insurers continue to lose money, more are likely to withdraw from the marketplaces, a move that would reduce choices for consumers and could contribute to higher premiums. In one county, Aetna’s exit in 2017 could leave no insurers offering policies through its marketplace.

Aetna said it will exit 11 of the 15 states where it offers coverage through the Affordable Care Act, widely known as Obamacare. That affects about 80 percent of its customers covered through insurance marketplaces.

The marketplaces, known as insurance exchanges, were created to provide coverage for Americans who cannot get affordable health benefits through a job. A key aspect of the health-care law, the marketplaces allow people to purchase insurance online with subsidies based on their income.
 
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