Operation Karma

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
A bunch of mugshots of middle-aged men convicted of sex offenses against minors makes for a frightening image. But I did the math, and most of these people were in their 20s, or teens themselves, when they were first convicted.

One of the sex offenders, whom I will call J.S., was convicted of molesting a victim who was less than 12-years-old. This was in 2005, and J.S. is currently 25—meaning that at the time of the alleged crime, J.S. would have been about 12 himself. Another perpetrator, C.C., who is currently 39, was convicted in 1998 of lewd conduct toward a person under the age of 16. This man would have been about 18 in 1998. Both were re-arrested for failing to register their cars.

I don't mean to excuse these people's bad behavior, and I don't know the specific details of their crimes. But the premise of the sex offender registry is that citizens deserve to know if people who live in their community are inclined to prey on their children. I am not convinced that the vast majority of these perpetrators represent any lingering threat, or that forcing them to register a new car or address with the government is defensible.

The name of this sting—"Operation Karma"—implies that the perpetrators' bad decisions are finally catching up with them. Instead, we see the reverse: The perpetrators have already been punished, and the authorities refuse to let them move on.


 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
My understanding is that if you commit a crime as a minor, it doesn't transfer over to your adult record. When you turn 18 (or 21?) your record is wiped clean.

Is that not the way it works anymore?

Anyway, Reason is off the rails lately. The author admits he doesn't know the specific crime these folks were convicted of, yet insists they shouldn't still be stigmatized by them. That's pretty irresponsible if you ask me.
 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
It's a bit hard to understand, how they hold these people to register forever, and yet they want felons and released drug dealers to be allowed to vote.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Arresting dude hat have kept clean sine their conviction seems a bit much ...
how about a nice visit and a reminder of the rules ...
 

Lurk

Happy Creepy Ass Cracka
If sex offenders are required to register as a sex offender with the authorities where they live, why cry when their pictures are posted in the newspaper. The photos, address and other features are posted in the on-line sex-offender registry already. If they fail to maintain current information to the authorities when something changes, the offender is usually breaking conditions of their probation. So they should be rearrested.

Now, who can think of a reason a child sex offender should be required to advise the authorities of the make, model, color, and registration for their automobiles? HINT: "Hey little girl, can I give you a ride home?"
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
Arresting dude hat have kept clean sine their conviction seems a bit much ...
how about a nice visit and a reminder of the rules ...
Or how about they follow the rules in the first place?

Or! I know! What if they didn't commit sex crimes and victimize little kids?
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

Problem is, is that it is, in essence a life sentence. Not just for these offenders, but for all, at all levels of these types of offenses. There should be a limitation. If on probation, up to when, what would be their full jailable sentence is up. Or say up to five years after. If terms are fully complied with, stayed out of trouble, etc., they are taken off the registry.
 
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