Police Corruption and Malfeasance

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

5 Louisiana Officers Indicted for Beating Motorist Ronald Greene to Death, Then Covering It Up



When Greene died, authorities told his family he had been killed in a car crash fleeing from police outside Monroe. In reality, Greene did crash his car into a tree, but that's not what killed him. Police body camera footage showed the troopers pulling him out of the car, beating him, tasing him, and even dragging him across the ground. The family's suspicions of the official account were bolstered by an emergency room report of Greene's injuries that didn't match what they were told.

The body camera footage was concealed from the public. The state didn't even open an investigation of the incident until more than 450 days after Greene's death, after his family filed a wrongful death lawsuit in May 2020. Then the Associated Press somehow got its hands on the body camera footage and released clips of it to the public in 2021, showing Greene's beating. The A.P. also got a recording of one of the troopers involved, Chris Hollingsworth, confessing to a colleague that he "beat the ever-living ****" out of Greene. After Hollingsworth was told in September 2020 that he was going to be fired for his role in Greene's death, he died in a single-car crash.

On Thursday, a state grand jury indicted five other law-enforcement officers connected. They face a host of charges from negligent homicide to malfeasance. The harshest charges were directed toward Master Trooper Kory York, who is seen on the footage dragging Greene across the ground by his ankles and putting his foot on Greene's back to force him face-down on the ground.

The A.P.'s accounting of all the charges shows a remarkable amount of not just cruelty but ass-covering:

The others who faced various counts of malfeasance and obstruction included a trooper who denied the existence of his body-camera footage, another who exaggerated Greene's resistance on the scene, a regional state police commander who detectives say pressured them not to make an arrest in the case and a Union Parish sheriff's deputy heard on the video taunting Greene with the words "s—- hurts, doesn't it?"
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
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Well, since we don't know what really happened, and Reason isn't know for its truthful reporting, I won't be getting exercised about this just yet.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I first heard this story on Fox News.

We still don't know what really happened. It's possible that the cop just went crazy and beat this man to death for no reason, but I've been sucked into those narratives before and then it turns out that the dead guy wasn't really some choir boy on his way home from buying medicine for his mama when popo just jumped out of the bushes and killed him.

They can only cry wolf so many times before I stop responding.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
We still don't know what really happened. It's possible that the cop just went crazy and beat this man to death for no reason, but I've been sucked into those narratives before and then it turns out that the dead guy wasn't really some choir boy on his way home from buying medicine for his mama when popo just jumped out of the bushes and killed him.

They can only cry wolf so many times before I stop responding.
True, but conversely, the po-po can only get up to no good so many times before I stop being in their corner and start going "meh" when bad things happen to them.

For example: the two cops who were ambushed and killed in Australia recently. Now maybe those two particular cops were pure as the driven snow and truly did not deserve their fate - and I believe with all my heart that they did not - after more than 2 years of watching cops around Australia, particularly Victoria and New South Wales, act like jack-booted gestapo, at least part of me says "meh."
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
True, but conversely, the po-po can only get up to no good so many times before I stop being in their corner and start going "meh" when bad things happen to them.

For example: the two cops who were ambushed and killed in Australia recently. Now maybe those two particular cops were pure as the driven snow and truly did not deserve their fate - and I believe with all my heart that they did not - after more than 2 years of watching cops around Australia, particularly Victoria and New South Wales, act like jack-booted gestapo, at least part of me says "meh."

Exactly. You just can't take a side anymore because we can't trust the media to give us direction. I'm aware that there are bad cops and I will jump right on the condemnation bandwagon; but the media tells a story that isn't even close to the truth, so what are we to believe?

As it stands, I'm more pro-cop than I am pro-ghetto rat, so I default to believing the cop unless it's clear that the cop was at fault. (Like that shitbag who shot Justine Damond) (And like the thugs in Australia)
 

Kyle

ULTRA-F###ING-MAGA!
PREMO Member
They can only cry wolf so many times before I stop responding.
8CF19D13-F3DA-4B89-B04B-F09D2049C397.jpeg
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
"George Loder claimed that his state police supervisors removed him from a federal task force and then denied him another detective job because he resisted orders to share information about his task-force work with the Maine Information and Analysis Center," noted Maine Public Radio. "He also voiced concern that the unit, part of a nationwide network of so-called fusion centers, retained information about lawful activity in violation of federal law."

"He specifically claimed that the center unlawfully gathered and maintained information about people who protested Central Maine Power's controversial transmission pipeline, people who applied to buy firearms, and counselors who worked at the Seeds of Peace summer camp in Otisfield," adds the Bangor Daily News.

Notably, officials admitted they gather information about people engaged in perfectly lawful activities, just as Loder alleged. They just denied there's anything wrong with the practice.

"It could be legal activity, but, in law enforcement, we have to prepare if it turns into something negative," Maine State Police Lt. Scott Ireland testified during the trial.


Jurors agreed with Loder that state officials broke the law by demoting him after he blew the whistle. They awarded him $300,000 in damages, while the judge in the case will decide what he's owed for back pay and benefits. State officials promise to pursue an outside review of intelligence-gathering practices.



 

glhs837

Power with Control
"George Loder claimed that his state police supervisors removed him from a federal task force and then denied him another detective job because he resisted orders to share information about his task-force work with the Maine Information and Analysis Center," noted Maine Public Radio. "He also voiced concern that the unit, part of a nationwide network of so-called fusion centers, retained information about lawful activity in violation of federal law."

"He specifically claimed that the center unlawfully gathered and maintained information about people who protested Central Maine Power's controversial transmission pipeline, people who applied to buy firearms, and counselors who worked at the Seeds of Peace summer camp in Otisfield," adds the Bangor Daily News.

Notably, officials admitted they gather information about people engaged in perfectly lawful activities, just as Loder alleged. They just denied there's anything wrong with the practice.

"It could be legal activity, but, in law enforcement, we have to prepare if it turns into something negative," Maine State Police Lt. Scott Ireland testified during the trial.


Jurors agreed with Loder that state officials broke the law by demoting him after he blew the whistle. They awarded him $300,000 in damages, while the judge in the case will decide what he's owed for back pay and benefits. State officials promise to pursue an outside review of intelligence-gathering practices.



This is what I've been talking about for a while. And Maryland has, or at least had, fusion centers a while back. This is literally how you end up with the Stasi police state. "Surveil everybody just in case"

Ah, no, you don't just start making lists and checking them twice. Who sets the limits? Who decides what should be gathered? Is everyone in MSI on a watch list? I've spoken up negatively about camera enforcement and APLRs. Should I be watched? Don't agree with the SMCSO running encrypted comms? Is that enough?
 

GregV814

Well-Known Member
GRAB PENSIONS..ITS THE ONLY ANSWER.


you do know I am being a sarcastic stickler dont you
 
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GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
We'll get back to the Tasers in a moment. It's possible to agree with the sentiment that we don't need armed police officers handling most traffic violations or incidents yet still recognize that this was a situation where police were going to be called. Assuming the LAPD account is accurate, the officers were called out in response to a hit-and-run incident, not just a minor collision. This is potentially a pretty serious crime that most people want police to investigate immediately. In addition, a witness on the scene can be heard in additional footage captured by a bystander claiming that Anderson attempted to get into his car and possibly steal it in order to get away from the crash scene.

Looking back, we can see that Anderson was not dangerous and was likely suffering from some sort of delusional response possibly attributable to drugs, but attempting to argue that police shouldn't have responded to this call is simply a non-starter. It is absolutely true that we should, as a practice, reduce armed interactions between police and citizens in nonviolent situations. But this encounter with Anderson is not a good case study as to why.

How the police responded and deployed their Taser against Anderson is, however, very much worthy of critique. We don't see all of the initial officer's interactions with Anderson, but what we do see isn't great. The officer at first is mostly focused on getting Anderson out of the street, which is very understandable. Anderson is at risk of getting hit by a car due to his erratic behavior. But the officer is either unconcerned with or uncertain of how to respond to Anderson's genuine—if completely misplaced and paranoid—fears. The officer is heavily focused on demanding compliance from somebody whose mental state is clearly compromised.

When Anderson eventually runs away and the officer chases him down, the officer starts yelling harshly at Anderson as though he's a bank robber caught with a gun in his hand at the scene of the crime, not somebody who is terrified and panicking. And when the police all collapse on Anderson, they yell "Stop resisting!" at him as they Tase him, a demand that is now ingrained in many people's brains as a justification that police use to cause harm to others. This is an example of police-fueled escalation.

The Los Angeles Times looked into the LAPD's rules for using Tasers and notes that the policy allows for their use "to control a suspect when the suspect poses an immediate threat to the officer or others." That doesn't appear to have been the case with Anderson. A use-of-force expert the Times turned to notes that there's no threat from Anderson, only a delay in detaining him caused by his fear and resistance. The LAPD's Taser policy is also clear that Tasers shall "not be used on a suspect or subject who is passively resisting or merely failing to comply with commands."


But when Tasers are called for, LAPD guidelines don't indicate a limit on how many attempts are possible. They are dangerous weapons, and experts recommend exposure of no more than five seconds at a time and a total of 15 seconds altogether.





 

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
No telling what this guy was hopped up on.
I guess these people feel that the police should have just blet a mentally screwed up individual just run off. After that they would accuse police of not trying to help him

One thing is certain in this case. damned if you do damned if you don't.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

DNA Test Links Woman To Cold Case Murder That Happened Before She Was Born



Jackie Vadurro thought the homicide detectives were kidding around, but it turned out that they weren’t. The homicide case wasn’t recent, either — it was thirty-six years old.

“I was so taken aback,” Vadurro told the New York Post.

“I knew I hadn’t done anything wrong,” she said, “But when the police call you about a murder, you’re like, ‘Oh my goodness, what am I involved in?’”

Vadurro spoke about the situation on social media, as well. She said that no one ever said the woman who was killed was missing and authorities don’t know who she is. She also has noted that officials have found out that she was a third or second cousin of the woman who died.
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
Ad Free Experience
Patron

DNA Test Links Woman To Cold Case Murder That Happened Before She Was Born



Jackie Vadurro thought the homicide detectives were kidding around, but it turned out that they weren’t. The homicide case wasn’t recent, either — it was thirty-six years old.

“I was so taken aback,” Vadurro told the New York Post.

“I knew I hadn’t done anything wrong,” she said, “But when the police call you about a murder, you’re like, ‘Oh my goodness, what am I involved in?’”

Vadurro spoke about the situation on social media, as well. She said that no one ever said the woman who was killed was missing and authorities don’t know who she is. She also has noted that officials have found out that she was a third or second cousin of the woman who died.
Have had DNA matches pop up where we actually have no relatives in common, but strands that are common in the ethnicities from which we descend.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

New Mexico Cops Fatally Shoot Homeowner After Showing Up at the Wrong House



"On April 5, 2023, at around 11:30 p.m., the Farmington Police Department received a call for a domestic violence incident occurring at 5308 Valley View Avenue," according to the New Mexico State Police Investigations Bureau, which is now investigating the incident. "Once on scene, officers mistakenly approached 5305 Valley View Avenue instead of 5308 Valley View Avenue." Police knocked on the (wrong) door, no one answered, and "officers asked their dispatch to call the reporting party back and have them come to the front door."

As they started to leave, 52-year-old homeowner Robert Dotson opened his front door holding a handgun—not an entirely unreasonable thing for someone to do when they get a strange knock on their door late at night.

No one alleges that Dotson pointed the gun at the police officers or threatened them.

Nonetheless, "at this point in the encounter, officer(s) fired at least one round from their duty weapon(s) striking Mr. Dotson," the state police report. The Farmington officers did not even tell the man who answered the door to drop his weapon nor give him time to comply with their order before firing upon him, according to the statement from state police.


This would be an insane overreaction even if the police had been at the right house. That police weren't even at the right house of course makes the shooting all the more senseless.
 
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TPD

the poor dad

New Mexico Cops Fatally Shoot Homeowner After Showing Up at the Wrong House



"On April 5, 2023, at around 11:30 p.m., the Farmington Police Department received a call for a domestic violence incident occurring at 5308 Valley View Avenue," according to the New Mexico State Police Investigations Bureau, which is now investigating the incident. "Once on scene, officers mistakenly approached 5305 Valley View Avenue instead of 5308 Valley View Avenue." Police knocked on the (wrong) door, no one answered, and "officers asked their dispatch to call the reporting party back and have them come to the front door."

As they started to leave, 52-year-old homeowner Robert Dotson opened his front door holding a handgun—not an entirely unreasonable thing for someone to do when they get a strange knock on their door late at night.

No one alleges that Dotson pointed the gun at the police officers or threatened them.

Nonetheless, "at this point in the encounter, officer(s) fired at least one round from their duty weapon(s) striking Mr. Dotson," the state police report. The Farmington officers did not even tell the man who answered the door to drop his weapon nor give him time to comply with their order before firing upon him, according to the statement from state police.


This would be an insane overreaction even if the police had been at the right house. That police weren't even at the right house of course makes the shooting all the more senseless.
There are some that will say if the homeowner didn't come to the door with a gun he may still be alive. We have rights people! Rights that are not used are soon lost. Like the Uber driver in Austin, TX that killed a BLM rioter in clear self defense who was just convicted - in Texas no less that has strong gun & self defense rights. We have given police (and the government in general) too much power and we need to rein it in, but me thinks it is a bit too late...
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
Like the Uber driver in Austin, TX that killed a BLM rioter in clear self defense who was just convicted - in Texas no less that has strong gun & self defense rights.
I heard Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick yesterday talking about this and how the Austin DA withheld exculpatory evidence that the lead detective had gathered in the case. He implied that doing so was an egregious act that taints the judicial process and that this was an unacceptable miscarriage of justice.
 

glhs837

Power with Control
I heard Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick yesterday talking about this and how the Austin DA withheld exculpatory evidence that the lead detective had gathered in the case. He implied that doing so was an egregious act that taints the judicial process and that this was an unacceptable miscarriage of justice.

Wait, you mean Austin, which a lot of Texans view as the LA of Texas, has a DA that might be biased against self defense?

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