Poll: 20% of Americans Say They Have Lost Friendships over Coronavirus Disagreements

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Funny you talk about learning facts: Seems like infrastructure to me


Biden’s infrastructure bill is chock-full of anti-white racism


Chances are high the infrastructure bill’s hodgepodge of anti-white discrimination will be struck down by federal courts. In 1989, the Supreme Court ruled that the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution bars government from trying to even the score by discriminating against whites and in favor of minorities. The justices warned against creating “a patchwork of racial preferences based on statistical generalizations” to correct past injustices. That’s precisely what this infrastructure bill does.

The bill’s backers would have you believe that obsolete airports, dilapidated public works and deteriorating roads and public spaces are evidence of racial injustice. Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY) rails that “our infrastructure is racist” and calls on the Congress to pass a bill that “puts the needs of underserved and disadvantaged communities at the fore.”

That’s code for minority communities. But the truth is, there are plenty of poor white people in this country, too, and poor, predominantly white communities that could benefit from a bold federal infrastructure initiative. Race and ethnicity should have nothing to do with it. Locate the projects and put the funds where the economic need is greatest, regardless of race.

West Virginia has the lowest average income in the nation and ranks 46th in internet connectivity. Maine ranks 36th out of 50 states for income, and 34th in broadband connectivity. People in these states could really benefit from federal broadband assistance. Here’s the hitch: The infrastructure bill tilts the grant scale in favor of states with high minority and non-English-speaking populations, instead of considering only economic need and existing broadband capacity. Because Maine and West Virginia are 94 percent white, they’ll get less.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
Funny you talk about learning facts: Seems like infrastructure to me

  • Roads, bridges and major projects: $110 billion
  • Passenger and freight rail: $66 billion
  • Broadband infrastructure: $65 billion
  • Water infrastructure, such as eliminating lead pipes: $55 billion
  • Public transit: $39.2 billion
  • Resiliency, including flood and wildfire mitigation, ecosystem restoration, weatherization and cybersecurity: $47.2 billion
  • Electric vehicle infrastructure, including chargers: $7.5 billion
  • Addressing legacy pollution including cleaning up brownfield and Superfund sites, reclaiming abandoned mine lands, plugging orphan oil and gas wells: $21 billion
Where's all that money gonna come from, Alexandra?
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
I think it's like the flu or the cold. It MAY be here to stay. It is NOT like polio or smallpox, which through vaccination programs have been more or less removed from the planet. It MAY be like SARS - which hasn't been seen in 16 years.
I've seen language recently connecting SARS to COVID.
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
Biden’s infrastructure bill is chock-full of anti-white racism


Chances are high the infrastructure bill’s hodgepodge of anti-white discrimination will be struck down by federal courts. In 1989, the Supreme Court ruled that the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution bars government from trying to even the score by discriminating against whites and in favor of minorities. The justices warned against creating “a patchwork of racial preferences based on statistical generalizations” to correct past injustices. That’s precisely what this infrastructure bill does.

The bill’s backers would have you believe that obsolete airports, dilapidated public works and deteriorating roads and public spaces are evidence of racial injustice. Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY) rails that “our infrastructure is racist” and calls on the Congress to pass a bill that “puts the needs of underserved and disadvantaged communities at the fore.”

That’s code for minority communities. But the truth is, there are plenty of poor white people in this country, too, and poor, predominantly white communities that could benefit from a bold federal infrastructure initiative. Race and ethnicity should have nothing to do with it. Locate the projects and put the funds where the economic need is greatest, regardless of race.

West Virginia has the lowest average income in the nation and ranks 46th in internet connectivity. Maine ranks 36th out of 50 states for income, and 34th in broadband connectivity. People in these states could really benefit from federal broadband assistance. Here’s the hitch: The infrastructure bill tilts the grant scale in favor of states with high minority and non-English-speaking populations, instead of considering only economic need and existing broadband capacity. Because Maine and West Virginia are 94 percent white, they’ll get less.
That was before Roberts and the Commie segment of the Court.
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I've seen language recently connecting SARS to COVID.
SARS was SARS-CoV-1.
COVID is SARS-CoV-2.

I don't know how one is connected to the other, if at all, except they have similar names.

Interestingly enough - the Wiki page on SARS lists four outbreaks due to lab accidents (or lab misconduct).
Having worked as a tech in the Harvard Medical School for over a year - I know that lab techs, even post-docs can be VERY careless. One of my jobs was to report people pipetting radioactive materials BY MOUTH. While it wouldn't surprise me in the least to believe that China released this ON PURPOSE - since evidently, from their own reported data they've had it under control since last spring (a lie) - it is EASY to believe it was released by accident.
 
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