POLL: Shutdown, Yay, Nay, Meh....

Shutdown, Yay, Nay, Meh....

  • YAY...Need a few days off!!!

    Votes: 5 25.0%
  • Nay...Want to take kiddies to Zoo and Museums!!

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Meh...Who really cares?

    Votes: 13 65.0%

  • Total voters
    20
?

..._

Guest
With a possible Shutdown in the near future, and having suffered the Days of Great Sequester of 2013, of which we had no say or choice about (yes, it is a WE the people country), do you really care what our brilliant, elected Public Servants do in the coming days.


Simply put:
Yay...I could use the days off...
Nay....Want to take the kiddies to the Zoo...
Meh.....who cares....we are powerless to make a difference anyway.


Have a good day tomorrow!!:buddies
 

aps45819

24/7 Single Dad
The zoo will be closed and all the animals will be released since there will be no one to feed them
 

migtig

aka Mrs. Giant
Politicians will still be working, along with all their staffers.

A government shut down doesn't effect them at all.

Americans are clueless if they think that's what a shut down means.
 

ZARA

Registered User
You forgot a fourth option:
Fire the Politicians for not doing their F*ing Job that they were hired for in the first place!

**Question-

When was the last time this crap happened? I mean before the current jackass took office..anyone?
 

Misfit

Lawful neutral
:coffee:
 

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belvak

Happy Camper
You forgot a fourth option:
Fire the Politicians for not doing their F*ing Job that they were hired for in the first place!

**Question-

When was the last time this crap happened? I mean before the current jackass took office..anyone?

Government shutdown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United States Federal Government has shut down on 17 occasions since 1976:[11][12]

  • September 30 to October 11, 1976 (10 days). Citing out of control spending, President Gerald Ford vetoed a funding bill for the United States Department of Labor and the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), leading to a partial government shutdown. On 1 October, the Democrat-controlled Congress overrode Ford's veto but it took until 11 October for a continuing resolution ending funding gaps for other parts of government to became law.
  • September 30 to October 13, 1977 (12 days). The Democrat-controlled House continued to uphold the ban on using Medicaid dollars to pay for abortions, except in cases where the life of the mother was at stake. Meanwhile, the Democrat-controlled Senate pressed to loosen the ban to allow abortion funding in the case of rape or incest. A funding gap was created when disagreement over the issue between the houses had become tied to funding for the Departments of Labor and HEW, leading to a partial government shutdown. A temporary agreement was made to restore funding through 31 October 1977, allowing more time for Congress to resolve its dispute.
  • October 31 to November 9, 1977 (8 days). The earlier temporary funding agreement expired. President Jimmy Carter signed a second funding agreement to allow for more time for negotiation.
  • November 30 to December 9, 1977 (8 days). The second temporary funding agreement expired. The House held firm against against the Senate in its effort to ban Medicaid paying for the abortions of victims of statutory rape. A deal was eventually struck which allowed Medicaid to pay for abortions in cases of from rape, incest, or in which the mother's health is at risk.
  • September 30 to October 18, 1978 (18 days). Deeming them wasteful, President Carter vetoed a public works appropriations bill and a defense bill including funding for a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Spending for the Department of HEW was also delayed over additional disputes concerning Medicaid funding for abortion.
  • September 30 to October 12, 1979 (11 days). Against the opposition of the Senate, the House pushed for a 5.5% pay increase for congress members and senior civil servants. The House also sought to restrict federal spending on abortion only to cases where the mother's life is in danger, while the Senate wanted to maintain funding for abortions in cases of rape and incest.
  • November 20 to November 23, 1981 (2 days). President Ronald Reagan pledged that he would veto any spending bill that failed to include at least half of the $8.4 billion in domestic budget cuts that he proposed. Although the Republican controlled Senate passed a bill that met his specifications, the Democratic House insisted on larger cuts to defense than Reagan wanted and for congressional and civil servant pay raises. A compromise bill fell $2 billion short of the cuts Reagan wanted, so Reagan vetoed the bill and shut down the federal government. A temporary bill restored spending through 15 December and gave Congress the time to work out a more lasting deal.
  • September 30 to October 2, 1982 (1 day) Congress passed the required spending bills a day late.
  • December 17 to December 21, 1982 (3 days) The House and the Senate wished to fund jobs, but President Reagan vowed to veto any such legislation. The House also opposed plans to fund the MX missile. The shutdown ended after Congress abandoned their jobs plan, but Reagan was forced to yield on funding for both the MX and the Pershing II missiles. He also accepted funding for the Legal Services Corporation, which he wanted abolished, in exchange for higher foreign aid to Israel.
  • November 10 to November 14, 1983 (3 days) The House increased education funding, but cut defense and foreign aid spending, which led to a dispute with President Reagan. Eventually, the House reduced their proposed education funding, and also accepted funding for the MX missile. However, the foreign aid and defense cuts remained, and oil and gas leasing was banned in federal wildlife refuges. Abortion was also prohibited for being paid for with government employee health insurance.
  • September 30 to October 3, 1984 (2 days) The House wished to link the budget to both a crime-fighting package President Reagan supported and a water projects package he did not. The Senate additionally tied the budget to a civil rights measure designed to overturn Grove City v. Bell. Reagan proposed a compromise where he abandoned his crime package in exchange for Congress dropping theirs. A deal was not struck, and a three-day spending extension was passed instead.
  • October 3 to October 5, 1984 (1 day) The three-day spending extension expired, forcing a shutdown. Congress dropped their proposed water and civil rights packages, while President Reagan kept his crime package. Funding for aid to the Nicaraguan Contras was also passed.
  • October 16 to October 18, 1986 (1 day) A dispute over multiple issues between the Democratic House and President Reagan and the Republican Senate forced a shutdown. The House dropped many of their demands in exchange for a vote on their welfare package, and a concession of the sale of then-government-owned Conrail.
  • December 18 to December 20, 1987 (1 day) Democrats, who now controlled both the House and the Senate, opposed funding for the Contras, and wanted to Federal Communications Commission to begin reenforcing the "Fairness Doctrine". They yielded on the "Fairness Doctrine" in exchange for nonlethal aid to the Contras.
  • October 5 to October 9, 1990 (3 days) President George H.W. Bush vowed to veto any continuing resolution that was not paired with a deficit reduction package, and did so when one reached his desk. The House failed to override his veto before a shutdown occurred. Congress then passed a continuing resolution with a deficit reduction package that Bush signed to end the shutdown.
  • November 13 to November 19, 1995 (5 days) President Bill Clinton vetoed a continuing resolution passed by the Republican-controlled Congress. A deal was reached allowing for 75% funding for four weeks, and Clinton agreed to a seven-year timetable for a balanced budget.
  • December 16, 1995 to January 6, 1996 (21 days) The Republicans demanded President Clinton propose a budget with the seven-year timetable using Congressional Budget Office numbers, rather than Clinton's more optimistic Office of Management and Budget numbers. However, Clinton refused. Eventually, Congress agreed to pass a budget, and Clinton proposed a budget the Republicans agreed with.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
interesting Dem vs Dem;

September 30 to October 13, 1977 (12 days). The Democrat-controlled House continued to uphold the ban on using Medicaid dollars to pay for abortions, except in cases where the life of the mother was at stake. Meanwhile, the Democrat-controlled Senate pressed to loosen the ban to allow abortion funding in the case of rape or incest.
 

Railroad

Routinely Derailed
Fourth Choice: It doesn't matter what I think, but I'm mad as hell that it came to this AGAIN while they did nothing all year
 

Bay_Kat

Tropical
My niece works for the federal govt and got an email today saying she will be off the rest of this week.
 

mamatutu

mama to two
Why President Obama and Democrats Want a Government Shutdown - Peter Roff (usnews.com)

partial article:

"Truth be told, Obama and Reid want a shutdown – unless they get everything they want. That means not just the survival of Obamacare but the busting of the spending caps so that the federal spigot can be turned back on and the money can start flowing once again to the constituent groups that are such an important part of the Democrat's electoral coalition. Anyone who doubts this should just look at the way the White House has been handing out waivers on Obamacare and to whom. In the political sense, they're the next best thing to cash.

There are some in the conservative coalition who really do want to force a government shutdown as they see it as the only way, the last gasp if you will, to stop Obamacare before it starts to be implemented. What most of the Washington punditocracy won't tell you is that the White House, Harry Reid and the Democrats want a shutdown just as much if not more They see it as the pathway back to control of the House after the 2014 election, which would allow Obama to finish his term much the same way he started it – with no checks and balances on him whatsoever.

With less than 24 hours to go before the end of the current fiscal year, it is highly likely there will be a shutdown – even if it is a brief one. Both parties will be looking at the polls to see who is getting the blame. If it falls on the White House, then Obama will deal."
 

BuddyLee

Football addict
Politicians will still be working, along with all their staffers.

A government shut down doesn't effect them at all.

Americans are clueless if they think that's what a shut down means.

"Roughly 3/4 of the Obama’s president’s 1,701-person staff will be furloughed. The Obama family will have to rough it with only 15 people to care for their family. They normally have 90 people taking care of the family. Vice President Biden, who has a staff of 24, would have to make do with 12."

Obama Issues Order To Shut Down Government - The Free Patriot
Perhaps a shut-down isn't so bad afterall.
 
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