Quaker Parrots

lillymay

New Member
Does anyone in here have a Quaker? Mine is giving me a real problem with her blood feathers, extracting them really and I need someone's advice who has had experience.
 

pixiegirl

Cleopatra Jones
It's either!

A parakeet is part of the parrot family.

The Quaker is a small parrot, reaching 11 to 12 inches in length. As a comparison, the Quaker is a bird similar in length to a Cockatiel, but the Quaker's body is heavier and more substantial with an average weight of 90 to 120 grams.

The overall color of the Quaker is green, with pale grey on the forehead, cheeks, throat and extending down to the chest. On the chest, the grey feathers are white-tipped, giving a scalloped effect. Some blue can be found in the tail and flight feathers. The eyes are a dark brown, and the bill is horn colored. Young birds look much the same except the colors are not as bright as on adult Quakers. The sex of the bird cannot be determined by its physical appearance but only by DNA or surgical sexing.

There are several color mutations in the Quaker, although many color varieties are not yet commonly available. The blue mutation has become more established in this country, and many blue Quakers are now being kept as treasured companions. Lutinos, pieds, albinos, cinnamons and cinnamon-blues are less common.
 

cattitude

My Sweetest Boy
I have a Cockatiel. After I lost my first one, I looked at some Quakers and did some reading about them. They are know to be feather pickers and can even go so far as to self mutilate. If I were you, I'd talk to a Quaker breeder or an avian vet. You might also look around for a forum similar to this that talks about different types of parrots/birds.
 

mAlice

professional daydreamer
pixiegirl said:
A parakeet is part of the parrot family.

The Quaker is a small parrot, reaching 11 to 12 inches in length. As a comparison, the Quaker is a bird similar in length to a Cockatiel, but the Quaker's body is heavier and more substantial with an average weight of 90 to 120 grams.

The overall color of the Quaker is green, with pale grey on the forehead, cheeks, throat and extending down to the chest. On the chest, the grey feathers are white-tipped, giving a scalloped effect. Some blue can be found in the tail and flight feathers. The eyes are a dark brown, and the bill is horn colored. Young birds look much the same except the colors are not as bright as on adult Quakers. The sex of the bird cannot be determined by its physical appearance but only by DNA or surgical sexing.

There are several color mutations in the Quaker, although many color varieties are not yet commonly available. The blue mutation has become more established in this country, and many blue Quakers are now being kept as treasured companions. Lutinos, pieds, albinos, cinnamons and cinnamon-blues are less common.
Every breeder in FL that I've ever spoken to about them says they are parakeets, the largest of the species. And they certainly look more like a parakeet than a parrot.
 

mAlice

professional daydreamer
It would seem that both Parrots and Parakeets fall under the order "Psittaciformes", Family "Psittacidae", and genus "Myiopsitta monachus" or Monk Parakeet/Parrot, Quaker Parrot/Parakeet, etc. Pick one.

"Everything I've read indicates that there is no argument for one over the other, with most articles referring to it as both in the same sentence or paragraph.

Parakeet, common name for the smaller members of the parrot family. As the name is based on size rather than on taxonomic relationship, members of about 15 diverse genera are called parakeets. Several are commonly kept as cage birds; the best known of these is the Australian budgerigar, which is the bird usually called parakeet in pet stores. Wild “budgies” are mostly green, but many color varieties have been bred in captivity. Budgerigars kept in captivity often mimic human speech, as do some other members of the parrot family.

The largest genus of parakeets in the tropical Americas contains 19 species, known in the cage-bird trade as conures. Closely related to these was the Carolina parakeet, which was once abundant in the southern United States but is now extinct, the last individual having died in captivity in 1918. It was about 30 cm (about 12 in) long, with a long, pointed tail, a green body, and a yellow head and orange face. Its extinction had several causes, but, primarily, it was shot as a severe pest in fruit-growing areas.

Scientific classification: Parakeets belong to the family Psittacidae. The Australian budgerigar is classified as Melopsittacus undulatus. Conures make up the genus Aratinga. The Carolina parakeet is classified as Conuropsis carolinensis."

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761578321/Parakeet.html
 
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remaxrealtor

Guest
lillymay said:
She's definately a funny bird. A biatch bird for that fact. Very picky who she choses to like and dislike. I'm going to post a pic.
Ex and I had a Quaker. We named him Fling because he was always flinging things out of his cage to get attention. Theyare fun little people, tons of personality. Talked a storm when you left the room, stood there like a statue when you came back in. He used to climb down from his cage and trot all around the house! :lmao:
 
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remaxrealtor

Guest
lillymay said:
The only time I cage her is when I go to bed. She definately has tons of personality. She'll climb down her cage onto the floor to shimmy up my bed and onto my nightstand to steal my earrings! She loves to sit on my shoulder and take sips of water out of my glass and screams with the highest pitch sound when I share it with her. She doesn't talk but will mimic noises like a siren, kisses or whistle. Here's a picture of bird!
Oh!!!!! Now I really miss the Flingingest bird! We did the same thing and only closed the cage at night, he got along amazingly well with the cat. I loved to "bird dance" with him. I never had any feather problems, but maybe a new and interesting toy would keep her attention off herself? Just a thought, good luck!
 

lillymay

New Member
remaxrealtor said:
Oh!!!!! Now I really miss the Flingingest bird! We did the same thing and only closed the cage at night, he got along amazingly well with the cat. I loved to "bird dance" with him. I never had any feather problems, but maybe a new and interesting toy would keep her attention off herself? Just a thought, good luck!
Like I said she's always taken care of this problem herself and I can't figure out why now of all times is she doing this. She gets alot of attention, free roam and all the jewelry she can hijack. Silly bird! :confused:
 

SouthernMdRocks

R.I.P. Bobo, We miss you!
lillymay said:
The only time I cage her is when I go to bed. She definately has tons of personality. She'll climb down her cage onto the floor to shimmy up my bed and onto my nightstand to steal my earrings! She loves to sit on my shoulder and take sips of water out of my glass and screams with the highest pitch sound when I share it with her. She doesn't talk but will mimic noises like a siren, kisses or whistle. Here's a picture of bird!
Really cute, we have a couple Congo African Grays, not so nice. They are a one person bird for sure,, but can be really funny as well. :howdy:
 
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remaxrealtor

Guest
SouthernMdRocks said:
Really cute, we have a couple Congo African Grays, not so nice. They are a one person bird for sure,, but can be really funny as well. :howdy:
I think theyare beautiful! Is all they say about them true, the huge vocabulary and all?
 
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