Random (Theology-Oriented) Book Recommendations

Yooper

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I wanted to start a thread for books in the religion category that I have found interesting and thus, worth - to me - recommending. I'll kick it off with two.

First, the "Faithlife Study Bible." While the NIV translation is third or fourth on my list of preferred translations* I love the notes.


Second, "The New Testament Commentary Guide: A Brief Handbook for Students and Pastors" by Nijay Gupta.


Glad to have others contribute....

Cheers!

* FWIW, I tend more toward using the ESV and NET editions.

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Yooper

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PREMO Member
Ramble follows....

Lots of good translations out there that vary in their presentations as a result of translation philosophy (i.e., dynamic equivalence vs formal equivalence or somewhere in-between), source texts/manuscripts (the "'KJV-only' or not" debate is a good example of this), and - speaking of the KJV - language choices (thee & thou, verbs ending with -eth, gendered/non-gendered language, etc.).

Of course, faith tradition plays a role, too: Protestants generally agree to a 66 book canon (39 OT and 27 NT), while Catholics and Orthodox (?) include the so-called apocryphal books, and other Christian churches (Armenian, Coptic, etc.) include/delete according to their traditions. What's amazing is that across the various Christian traditions there is virtually unanimous agreement of the "core 66" of the Bible. And even more amazing is the agreement across time and number of the manuscripts. Even where there are differences the differences are minor in theological importance and actually help to weed out "rogue" texts and increase our confidence in what is the "real" text. Truly providential!

Anyway, for study, I tend toward translations that are more formal than dynamic and include manuscripts and other sources (such as the Dead Sea scrolls) to validate the translation. Thus, my "lean" is toward the NET* and ESV.** For devotional reading, I like the HCSB, NIV, NLT, and "The Message." But I will also use (to varying degrees) the NKJV and NASB. (I'm really not a fan of the KJV for several reasons, but that's a minor sidebar story.)

Of course, in the end, the best Bible translation is the one that one will pick up, open, and use!

One last bit of rambling.... I really found this funny:

* For those interested in checking it out, the NET is available (with notes) free and online here:
(Not sure why the link is for Genesis 1, but the "quote" is from Malachi 4....)

** The newer Lutheran Study Bibles use the ESV if I'm not mistaken (mine from about 10 years ago is ESV).

Enjoy the evening! Cheers, all!

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stgislander

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
** The newer Lutheran Study Bibles use the ESV if I'm not mistaken (mine from about 10 years ago is ESV).
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That's interesting considering most Lutheran churches still use RSV or NRSV for their common lectionary.
 
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