Red Tailed Hawk?

Rael

Supper's Ready
Not a great shot, I took this a few weeks ago. I'm thinking this is a juvenile red-tailed hawk. A regular visitor these past few weeks, "RT" flew in slowly and perched on a branch near our bird feeder about a half hour ago.

The other birds didn't seem bothered at all, which was unusual to me. Normally when an RT is nearby, the other birds flee quickly. Maybe this one is too young to be a threat yet? Can anyone confirm this even as an RT hawk? TIA.
 

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natbugs

New Member
I have seen red tail hawks very small but already have a red tail...so I think the young ones already have a red tail.how big was he??
 

itsbob

I bowl overhand
THe picture is kinda fuzzy, but I think this is the same type of bird I saw on a wire on Rte5 just South of SMC..

It was BIG, thought at first it was an owl, until I saw the head.
 

Rael

Supper's Ready
I have seen red tail hawks very small but already have a red tail...so I think the young ones already have a red tail.how big was he??
Hard to put an exact size, but the wingspan was very wide (guessing three feet or more). The underside was mostly white with numerous brown patches. I was looking for red on the tail, but it seemed mostly brown. Slow to take flight, and slow in flight. Young eagle maybe...?
 

Rael

Supper's Ready
THe picture is kinda fuzzy, but I think this is the same type of bird I saw on a wire on Rte5 just South of SMC..

It was BIG, thought at first it was an owl, until I saw the head.
My camera is only a small digital, I zoomed in while cropping to get the best definition/size I could.
There's a barred owl who visits also, and I initially thought that, but (same thing) saw the smaller head.

I had tried some photo comparisons, too. Google images has a lot, just difficult to compare without a better shot from me I guess. I'll try to get a better shot on the next visit.
 

rack'm

Jaded
I had tried some photo comparisons, too. Google images has a lot, just difficult to compare without a better shot from me I guess. I'll try to get a better shot on the next visit.
I didn't see anywhere in the article that said that the tail turned red after a certain amount of time, I'd deduce that the tail is red from the beginning.
 
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toppick08

Guest
I think you've got a red-tailed. Watch out squirrels(nhboy included)........lol.
 
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Mousebaby

Guest
Best I could get from hubby is it could be they are around right now. :shrug: He couldn't really tell from the pic either. He is usually pretty good at this, he is the dead animal scooper upper on base! :lmao: They call us at all hours of the night for him to come and rescue people from opossums and raccoons in the trash cans.
 
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Rael

Supper's Ready
I didn't see anywhere in the article that said that the tail turned red after a certain amount of time, I'd deduce that the tail is red from the beginning.
I'm thinking the same thing. In the wiki article it also mentioned variations of the RT, called morphs (light, dark, or rufous). Most of the photos I've seen for the RT the tail is clearly red, unlike the one I saw.

And yes toppick08...the barred owl and RT...nature's squirrelus grabbus upperis!

Thx, Mousebaby, too.
 
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Inkpen

Guest
Here are 2 photos of a juvenile red tail taken in August.

From the photo, it is hard to tell exactly what it is and there is nothing to compare for scale/size.
Could be a Juv. RT or a Broadwing..the eye looks darker than a typical red tail..

Good reference book: Photographic Guide to North Americal Raptors, by Wheeler and Clark

Thanks for posting the hawk!!! :howdy:
 
J

jaybeeztoo

Guest
Here are 2 photos of a juvenile red tail taken in August.

From the photo, it is hard to tell exactly what it is and there is nothing to compare for scale/size.
Could be a Juv. RT or a Broadwing..the eye looks darker than a typical red tail..

Good reference book: Photographic Guide to North Americal Raptors, by Wheeler and Clark

Thanks for posting the hawk!!! :howdy:
That is a beautiful picture of the hawk in wingspan. Thanks for posting Inkpen.
 
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Inkpen

Guest
Thanks...we are trying to document ALL raptors rescued to help with identification of species in this area.
There are so many phases in coloration it is confusing!!

This one suffered from wind trauma, got knocked down, could not eat..
But after some TLC and room service, made a full recovery and was released.
This hawk went to Wildlife Rescue in Hampstead, MD. for treatment.
 

Rael

Supper's Ready
I didn't see anywhere in the article that said that the tail turned red after a certain amount of time, I'd deduce that the tail is red from the beginning.
Bird Watcher's General Store
"It takes a while for Red-tailed Hawks to actually get their red tails. For the first year the bird's tail is mostly brown with stripes."

The quote may not be from a verifiable source, but it is the first I've read that said juveniles take a while to get their red tail. So I'm guessing this is what I have roaming the back yard (haven't seen the hawk this weekend yet). Interesting.
 

cellsite

New Member
hawk

Though not a bird aficionado, I did see an unusual one perched overlooking my back yard in Wildewood.

My daughter pointed it out as we left to drop her off at school. It appeared to be an owl by size, but did not turn its head in the characteristic fashion of an owl.

Upon returning from my school trip 30 minutes later, the bird was still perched in the same spot. I approached and could see it was not an owl, for sure. Still, it was rather large. It had a brownish-red breast. When it finally took off, it spread its wings and I could see the tail...black with white tips in a fan-tail fashion.

I checked the google bird identification sites, and found a duplicate when I found the red-tailed hawks. Though the colors at first did not match, I did find the rufous variety hawk has that same color pattern.

It seemed perfectly at home and unafraid. I am puzzled to know if the hawk is waiting to snack on our over-abundance of squirrels, or is waiting to munch on our two toy Pomeranians. They play outside in our fenced-in back yard most of the day. I am going to hold them indoors until I get some more feedback on whether there is a danger for them here, or not.

Anyone have any ideas on this? Thanks!
 
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