Should felons get to vote?

Should felons be allowed to vote?

  • Yes

    Votes: 3 13.6%
  • No

    Votes: 16 72.7%
  • Depends on their crime(s)

    Votes: 3 13.6%

  • Total voters
    22

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
It's pretty easy to not commit felonies. I've managed to avoid it my whole life, as has everyone I know.
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
Absolutely. Once they have served their sentence and are back in society they should get all of their rights back, to include voting.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
Staff member
PREMO Member
Absolutely. Once they have served their sentence and are back in society they should get all of their rights back, to include voting.
I understood this to be a current events question, as in "should felons be allowed to vote from prison?"
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
I understood this to be a current events question, as in "should felons be allowed to vote from prison?"
Well not all of us have the ability to sit next to the thread starter and pick up on the subtle nuances.

In prison, no. Out, after completing sentence, yes.
 

Yooper

Socket 1, Intel 80486
PREMO Member
In prison, no. Out, after completing sentence, yes.
Nope. Never. A felon forfeits his/her/xer right to participate. FOREVER. No guns, no votes, no full participation in our civic life post-conviction.

Don't water down felony offenses. Felonies are serious crimes and I still believe in the deterrent aspect of the legal system. Want lesser felons to regain the privilege? Then reclassifiy their offenses as misdemeanors. More serious/violent felonies, no.

Not playing the social justice game either. If a disproportionate number of a certain group of people are convicted felons, then that group needs to quit asking the rest of society to join it at the bottom of the social septic tank. Instead, climb on out and joining the rest of the responsible.

The ONLY possible way I would even consider this "felons regain the vote" would be after a felon served a long, successful, honorable enlistment in the military or a substantial length of time passed with no further runs-in with the law (say, 25 years). In both case, less-serious, non-violent felonies only.

Otherwise, as I said, nope. Never.

I feel strongly about a number of things. This is one of maybe five that I feel REALLY strongly about. FWIW.

--- End of line (MCP)
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
Nope. Never. A felon forfeits his/her/xer right to participate. FOREVER. No guns, no votes, no full participation in our civic life post-conviction.

Don't water down felony offenses. Felonies are serious crimes and I still believe in the deterrent aspect of the legal system. Want lesser felons to regain the privilege? Then reclassifiy their offenses as misdemeanors. More serious/violent felonies, no.

Not playing the social justice game either. If a disproportionate number of a certain group of people are convicted felons, then that group needs to quit asking the rest of society to join it at the bottom of the social septic tank. Instead, climb on out and joining the rest of the responsible.

The ONLY possible way I would even consider this "felons regain the vote" would be after a felon served a long, successful, honorable enlistment in the military or a substantial length of time passed with no further runs-in with the law (say, 25 years). In both case, less-serious, non-violent felonies only.

Otherwise, as I said, nope. Never.

I feel strongly about a number of things. This is one of maybe five that I feel REALLY strongly about. FWIW.

--- End of line (MCP)
Well I disagree. If the crime is serious enough to remove the protection of rights then keep them in prison or use the death penalty. If you return them to society, return them whole.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
The ONLY possible way I would even consider this "felons regain the vote" would be after a felon served a long, successful, honorable enlistment in the military or a substantial length of time passed with no further runs-in with the law (say, 25 years). In both case, less-serious, non-violent felonies only.

Otherwise, as I said, nope. Never.

I feel strongly about a number of things. This is one of maybe five that I feel REALLY strongly about. FWIW.

--- End of line (MCP)
So you are saying to handle it like they do points on your driving record. Keep your nose clean for a few years and you get your right to vote back.
 

Merlin99

Visualize whirled peas
PREMO Member
Nope. Never. A felon forfeits his/her/xer right to participate. FOREVER. No guns, no votes, no full participation in our civic life post-conviction.

Don't water down felony offenses. Felonies are serious crimes and I still believe in the deterrent aspect of the legal system. Want lesser felons to regain the privilege? Then reclassifiy their offenses as misdemeanors. More serious/violent felonies, no.

Not playing the social justice game either. If a disproportionate number of a certain group of people are convicted felons, then that group needs to quit asking the rest of society to join it at the bottom of the social septic tank. Instead, climb on out and joining the rest of the responsible.

The ONLY possible way I would even consider this "felons regain the vote" would be after a felon served a long, successful, honorable enlistment in the military or a substantial length of time passed with no further runs-in with the law (say, 25 years). In both case, less-serious, non-violent felonies only.

Otherwise, as I said, nope. Never.

I feel strongly about a number of things. This is one of maybe five that I feel REALLY strongly about. FWIW.

--- End of line (MCP)
I'm not sure I'd make that the only way to regain your status, but I don't disagree with the sentiment.
 

limblips

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
Nope. Losing your right to vote is part of the punishment for committing the felony. To get the right reinstated is removing what is supposed to be a deterrent to criminality. As for being a good person for a period of time, we already have that. The felon can petition to have the felony removed. And for military service to reinstate voting rights, nope again. The military does not need to have the 70+ % recividism and the associated administration burden.
 

Yooper

Socket 1, Intel 80486
PREMO Member
So you are saying to handle it like they do points on your driving record. Keep your nose clean for a few years and you get your right to vote back.
No. Not really. I am pretty much 100% against restoration of voting (or other) rights. But I am always willing to listen. So I offered two possible means by which I might consider the "pro" restoration position.

Not thrilled with the military idea, but it has the sense of service I think a felon would have to show/undergo for reinstatement (in other words, do something for someone else, rather than yourself).

The longevity option may not require selfless service, but the lengthy period of time could be seen as a serious intent to "remain reformed." In what is surely a poor example (but the only one that comes to mind as I type) we believe an alcoholic can "remain sober" the longer that person has been sober.

--- End of line (MCP)
 

afjess1989

Amount of F##Ks given, 0
Depending on their crime and if they have served their time and have become productive member's of society then yes, they should be able to vote.
 

Hannibal

Member
My belief is that if the law/court said you are to serve X amount of years in prison as punishment for your crime and you do so "honorably", then you've paid your debt to society in the eyes of the law/court. As such, your rights should be returned (within reason). This doesn't mean your are released of all penalties. For example, a convicted sex offender should still remain on the sex offenders list after prison. A felon whose crime involved a handgun or violent criminal act should not be allowed to own/purchase a firearm, etc. But the person should be allowed to pay for their crime as deemed appropriate by our court system and become a better person and a better member of society (be allowed to participate) post prison. Otherwise, if take away all incentive to improve, why would you?
 
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