So it's been 18 years

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
Where were you when you heard? What were your feelings? What did you do?

I'm always a little curious about other peoples stories and reactions and having read some recent stories online- I'm curious all over again.

I was at work, in a cinder block room without windows, with no contact to my co-workers and no internet. I didn't even hear about it for nearly two hours after the first strike and then only long enough for someone to stick their head in the door and say hey an airplane flew into a building in New York. I think my reaction was huh and that was pretty much it. It wasn't until my mother called around 12 to say do you know what's going on in the world? I left work to go hug my older son and pick up my youngest from elementary school - there were a lot of parents doing the same thing. I remember how quiet it was and how tranquil the day seemed. I spent the next few hours glued to the television and when someone in the neighborhood started a lawn mower, I went outside and looked at the sky in a panic. It had just been that quiet.
 

RareBreed

Throwing the deuces
I was at work and a Supervisor just starting her shift came in and said a plane crashed into one of the Twin Towers. I thought what kind of idiot can't avoid hitting a building? Then I heard about the second plane and realized it wasn't an accident. I ended up leaving for home as I work near DC and didn't want to be anywhere near there. Wilson Bridge was a cluster-f*** and I thought, "what if a plane hits the bridge with all these people on here?" I got home and picked up my oldest from daycare and watched the news the rest of the day in disbelief.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I was walking out the door to go to the office and my Mom called. "Turn on the TV quick!" I turned on the TV and saw the reporting that a plane had crashed into one of the WTC towers. Then right there live, the second plane crashed into the other tower. The headbots on TV were still saying it may be an accident, but it was pretty clear by then that we were under attack.

I turned to my then-husband and said, "We're at war."

As it happens, like two days before I had dropped my son off for the limo to take him off to process into boot camp, so the timing of the attack was poor.

I didn't panic. I didn't go get the girls from school. The oldest was in high school, so they were told over the PA, and the middle girl found out through the school grapevine. The youngest (I think she was 10) had no idea what was happening, and we didn't really feel the need to make that part of her life. She was like, "Do I need to worry about this?" and we told her, "No," so she didn't.

This was the beginning of my intimate relationship with the teachers and vice-principals at the girls' schools. I'll bet I was in there once a week taking them down for teaching our kids hate-America bullshit. Prior to this incident I understood on some level that our college system gins out anti-American dissidents and installs them in classrooms to indoctrinate young minds, but it didn't really become clear to me until after 9/11.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
I was in my office when someone said something about a plane flying in to the WTC. We all walked over to my house, 200' away, and watched everything unfold, including the second plane in to the WTC, on the big old console color TV I had at the time. I don't recall how long we stayed there and watched...but it was a long time.

One of my employees was scheduled to fly out of Reagan that morning to go to some vessel job or other. He had arrived and parked his car and, as soon as he got out of it, he heard lots of sirens in the distance and what looked like smoke coming from what he later learned was the Pentagon. The plane had hit the Pentagon shortly before. He said the stupidest thing he ever did was to proceed to the terminal anyway, because he didn't finally escape Alexandria and make it back to St. Mary's until late that evening. Had he simply gotten right back in to his car an made a beeline back south, he could have escaped the gridlock that ensued. He did say he made some new friends that day..other folks stuck in the long line of parked traffice trying to exit DC/Arlington/Alexandria.
 

mitzi

Well-Known Member
I was off work that day and my son was home sick. My daughter was home too. I was sleeping in, they had been up. My daughter came in and told me I needed to get up and see the news. She told me about the plane and my thought was a small plane off course and she told me it was an airliner. We watched in horror and disbelief as it all unfolded. Seeing the people jumping, I can't even describe how I felt. For once we were all speechless. My Dad called and said he coming down. We watched it all day. I made a big meal while we talked about it and the fear of what could happen next. In a weird way it was a very somber family day. We all wanted to be together. I slept very little that night with the TV on. I was afraid to turn it off.
 

nutz

Well-Known Member
I was in Bethesda that day for a briefing when a coworker yelled out to come see this. I got there in time to hear his brief recap and watch the second plane hit the towers. When the news came that the Pentagon had been hit, I realized that I was in the wrong place and should be at Andrews. By that time, DC had closed all of the bridges and a few roads and was just diverting traffic anywhere away from town. I ended up showing a police officer my military ID and telling him I need to get to Andrews. He let me through and later that day I was in Florida. Before the week was over I was at Incirlik, Turkey starting my next adventure in that part of the globe.
 
I was in Bethesda that day for a briefing when a coworker yelled out to come see this. I got there in time to hear his brief recap and watch the second plane hit the towers. When the news came that the Pentagon had been hit, I realized that I was in the wrong place and should be at Andrews. By that time, DC had closed all of the bridges and a few roads and was just diverting traffic anywhere away from town. I ended up showing a police officer my military ID and telling him I need to get to Andrews. He let me through and later that day I was in Florida. Before the week was over I was at Incirlik, Turkey starting my next adventure in that part of the globe.
Thank you for your dedication and service.
 

kom526

They call me ... Sarcasmo
I was still working nights and started my morning routine of coffee and news that morning. I had been watching channel 4 the night before so Tom Brokaw was broadcasting from the top of 30 Rock and like most everyone else that morning, watched the second plane hit. I tried calling my mom (still at PAX at the time) trying to find out if she had heard any scuttlebutt. She worked at Admin/PSD/Travel bldg in 2001, and was right down the hall from the CO's office. She was hysterical over the amount of action that was going on at the time.

I eventually went outside and for some reason my neighbors were starting to come home from work. PAX secured? We ended up standing under the tree at the end of my driveway listening to the radio and shaking our heads. I do know that I did not get a lot of work done that night at work. What I will never forget is watching and seeing plane 2 hit behind Brokaw's head.
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
At work, on base, basically locked down, no real idea what was going on until we got a TV hooked up to the cable so we could see the news.
What made me nervous was another shooting, some 8 years earlier. If I have one problem with "security" on base it's that like the CIA and other government establishments, we are all lined up outside the defended zone, ripe for an attack. One of the reasons they stopped issuing stickers for vehicles was that it advertised your "status" / Rank. Why we are discouraged from putting decals on our vehicles that identify us as related to the military.

At around 8 a.m on January 25, 1993, Qazi stopped a borrowed brown Datsun station wagon[5] behind a number of vehicles waiting at a red traffic light on the eastbound side of Route 123, Fairfax County.[6] The vehicles were waiting to make a left turn into the main entrance of CIA headquarters. Qazi emerged from his vehicle with an AK-47 type semi-automatic rifle and proceeded to move among the lines of vehicles, firing a total of 10 rounds into them,[7] killing Lansing H. Bennett, 66, and Frank Darling, 28. Three others were left with gunshot wounds.[4] Darling was shot first and later received additional gunshot wounds to the head after Qazi shot the other people. According to a CIA release, "all the victims were full-time or contract employees with the agency." No other details were revealed.[8]

During his later confession, Qazi said that he only stopped firing because "there wasn't anybody else left to shoot", and that he only shot male passengers because, as a Muslim, "it would be against [his] religion to shoot females".[4] He was surprised at the lack of an armed response: "I thought I will be arrested, or maybe killed in a shootout with CIA guards or police."[2]

Qazi climbed back into his vehicle and drove to a nearby park. After 90 minutes of waiting, he realized that he was not being actively sought and drove back to his Reston apartment.[4] He hid the rifle in a green plastic bag under a sofa, went to a McDonald's to eat, and booked into a Days Inn for the night. He learned from CNNnews reports that police had misidentified his vehicle and did not have his license plate number.[3] The next morning, he took a flight to Quetta, Pakistan. Qazi stated his motive in a prison interview with CNN affiliate WTTG Fox 5: "I was real angry with the policy of the U.S. government in the Middle East, particularly toward the Palestinian people."[9]
 
I had just left my off-base office, heading to support the C-130 group on base. Heard it on the radio while in transit as a small single engine plane that struck one of the towers. Didn't think a whole lot about it at the time, but when I got to the site on base and more details came in, it was clear what a horrific event it really was.
 

Yooper

Up. Identified. Lase. Fire. On the way.
PREMO Member
Directly across the Potomac from the Pentagon.

Had just seen the WTC strikes on TV and was walking out of the building I worked in as the plane struck the Pentagon (so I didn't see the aircraft approach). Thought the sound I heard was some sort of military event somewhere along the river (that section of the Potomac has numerous military installations on both sides). Smoke coming up from the Pentagon was confusing in the seconds/minutes before the news came in.

Had friends over at the Pentagon that day; all were safe as they had left where the plane struck a bit earlier and were on the other side of the building. Didn't know personally any of those killed/wounded, but did know a few by name.

I know I will never forget that day. Nor will I ever forget the tragedy of so many innocent deaths or the bravery of the first responders who "ran to the sound of the guns." Such courage. Many of them paid the ultimate sacrifice and many are still paying for their bravery that day. Nor will I ever forget the brave men and women who, in the days/years afterward, signed up voluntarily to fight. Such courage. All who served (and those who continue to do so) gave some. Some, to their everlasting glory, gave all.

John 15:13

--- End of line (MCP)
 

Grumpy

Well-Known Member
Directly across the Potomac from the Pentagon.
Was working at L'Enfant Plaza, a little upriver from the Pentagon. DC was understandably a mess, I had the car, wife was cross town on K St. She ended up walking to where I was, still took us 2.5 hours to get home from DC.
 
Today is my nephew's 18th birthday. In my family we say, 'at least something good happened on this day'.

ETA: I was at work, and going to leave to go to the hospital (in Annapolis), to be there when my sister delivered. Suffice it to say, I didn't make it up there that day.
 

Gummie

Member
I was at work in Suitland, another civilian and myself went to the Commo and said we would take the watch to let the young sailors go home to be with their families. We were ordered to go home, "because if we get hit, you have the knowledge to get us back on the air". May have been the only time that we "Sand Crabs" were acknowledged that we knew anything. The next day was eerie as the building was a ghost town.
 

Bushy23

Member
I was crying while watching the coverage. Then I heard this and it made me soooo happy!!!

"40 Wall Street actually was the second-tallest building in downtown Manhattan, and it was actually, before the World Trade Center, was the tallest — and then, when they built the World Trade Center, it became known as the second tallest. And now it’s the tallest,"

He's the best!!!!!
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
I was crying while watching the coverage. Then I heard this and it made me soooo happy!!!

"40 Wall Street actually was the second-tallest building in downtown Manhattan, and it was actually, before the World Trade Center, was the tallest — and then, when they built the World Trade Center, it became known as the second tallest. And now it’s the tallest,"

He's the best!!!!!
Built in 1930...one of Trump's earliest projects.


:killingme
 

Lump

New Member
I was at work in White Plains. We had a tiny black and white TV that we set up in the main lobby, barely got reception. I had to let some of our staff leave, as their parents worked at the Pentagon and they were frantic. My husband and I finally got a break and went to Roy Rogers in La Plata to eat and just sat in the truck listening to the news. I will never forget watching the news once we got home and seeing all of the people trying to flee the city. I try to watch the documentary that the two French guys made each year. It always gives me chills just like that day. When they start talking about the noise of the bodies hitting the ground..... I know I will never forget.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
I was at work in White Plains. We had a tiny black and white TV that we set up in the main lobby, barely got reception. I had to let some of our staff leave, as their parents worked at the Pentagon and they were frantic. My husband and I finally got a break and went to Roy Rogers in La Plata to eat and just sat in the truck listening to the news. I will never forget watching the news once we got home and seeing all of the people trying to flee the city. I try to watch the documentary that the two French guys made each year. It always gives me chills just like that day. When they start talking about the noise of the bodies hitting the ground..... I know I will never forget.
I'm not sure I saw that one - do you remember the name by any chance?
 
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