So it's been 18 years

Lump

New Member
Thank you - I'll have to look that one up.
They just happened to be here filming the Fire Departments. The footage is really raw. At one point they both get lost from each other and have no idea if the other is still alive.

Do you all remember how eerie it was for days/weeks after when no planes were in the sky? And then when they started to fly again, how weird that felt? Especially when you saw one thinking it was flying really low...
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
Directly across the Potomac from the Pentagon.

Had just seen the WTC strikes on TV and was walking out of the building I worked in as the plane struck the Pentagon (so I didn't see the aircraft approach). Thought the sound I heard was some sort of military event somewhere along the river (that section of the Potomac has numerous military installations on both sides). Smoke coming up from the Pentagon was confusing in the seconds/minutes before the news came in.

Had friends over at the Pentagon that day; all were safe as they had left where the plane struck a bit earlier and were on the other side of the building. Didn't know personally any of those killed/wounded, but did know a few by name.

I know I will never forget that day. Nor will I ever forget the tragedy of so many innocent deaths or the bravery of the first responders who "ran to the sound of the guns." Such courage. Many of them paid the ultimate sacrifice and many are still paying for their bravery that day. Nor will I ever forget the brave men and women who, in the days/years afterward, signed up voluntarily to fight. Such courage. All who served (and those who continue to do so) gave some. Some, to their everlasting glory, gave all.

John 15:13

--- End of line (MCP)
I saw a terrorist training video where a supposed expert thought that the 4th plane was going to be also flown into the Pentagon, except it would come in at the opposite side of the first plane to hit the building. His analysis said that after the first crash, people would exit the building furthest away from the crash. That would have made them an easy target.

As sad as it turned out, if that plane had stayed airborne a few more moments, the devastation would have been a lot worse.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
They just happened to be here filming the Fire Departments. The footage is really raw. At one point they both get lost from each other and have no idea if the other is still alive.

Do you all remember how eerie it was for days/weeks after when no planes were in the sky? And then when they started to fly again, how weird that felt? Especially when you saw one thinking it was flying really low...
I sure as hell do. I live a mile or so from NESEA - there's always some kind of low level noise coming from there. For some reason on that day, there were no cars on the road, no noise from NESEA;, even the usual nature noises seemed absent. It was almost like that proverbial pin drop. In my original post I stated someone decided to cut the grass. I immediately went outside to check the sky only to see my neighbor doing the exact same thing. I don't scare easy, but something about that day - everything was out of sorts.
 

frequentflier

happy to be living
I had called in "sick of work" that morning; was working as a heavy equip operator at Edwards AF Base in CA. I had the news on in the bedroom and I remember watching and thinking this cannot be happening. It was horrific to watch and to try to imagine what it must have been like to be there. I stayed in the bedroom watching the news most of the day. My boss called and told me to come in for the 3 to midnight shift which I stayed on for quite awhile.
 

Lump

New Member
I sure as hell do. I live a mile or so from NESEA - there's always some kind of low level noise coming from there. For some reason on that day, there were no cars on the road, no noise from NESEA;, even the usual nature noises seemed absent. It was almost like that proverbial pin drop. In my original post I stated someone decided to cut the grass. I immediately went outside to check the sky only to see my neighbor doing the exact same thing. I don't scare easy, but something about that day - everything was out of sorts.
Yeah, I think the only other time I was that in tune to things around me was when the sniper was riding around. (Not meaning to change the subject!)
 

SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I was sitting at my desk and could hear commotion down the hall, and next thing I knew we were all watching it on TV. I think until the second one hit, we all just figured it was a freak accident. I don't remember much work getting done that morning. I remember being stunned and wondering how many more were going to hit.

Not long after the Pentagon hit, I contacted my family, because although my Dad didn't work in the Pentagon, he went there often for meetings.
Turns out he was walking over from the Navy Annex when he saw a low flying plane. And fortunately, we didn't know anyone in the Pentagon that was injured or killed - but - my sister knew a teacher from Trinity College - who was on the plane.
 

Monello

Awww, jeez
PREMO Member
I had flown to Italy the day before. I landed in Aviano then drove over to Vicenza where I got a room on base. I still had a ways to go to get to my final destination but I was tired and jet lagged so stopping and getting some rest made sense.

Given that there is a 6 hour time difference, I got a late start heading to NE Italy. I had the radio tuned to a station out of Milan. Every half hour they did a 5 minute news segment. Shortly after the first plane hit, when the news came on they announced a plane hit the building. They gave very little detail. My incorrect assumption was that it was a small plane. The news was very matter of fact and didn't suggest that this was something other than an unfortunate accident.

The music continued. The next news segment they announced that another plane had hit the adjacent tower. I have to translate what the said, and I thought that I had just misunderstood the Italian because to me it sounded like they said a 2nd plane hit the tower. But this time there was a lot more animation in the announcer's voice. Shortly he was joined by a colleague. They announce a plane has slammed into the Pentagon. Then I heard something that gave me chills, "L'America e sotto l'attacco (America is under attack).

My mom lives 15 miles from Manhattan. In junior high, on the 4th floor, you could see the skyline of Manhattan. On a clear day it looked like you could reach out and touch it. I tried calling but the operator told me that all the phone lines in the NYC/Northern NJ area were all jammed. Back in the car heading down the A4. The radio is no longer playing music. They are reporting that there are over a dozen planes that are airborne and aren't responding to the tower. I get that in the confusion, things are reported that turn out not to be true. At that moment I just thought that more planes were going to fall out of the sky.

1 more did crash and that would be the end of the carnage as far as planes were concerned. While listening to the radio, I had to translate what they said. In the moments where they weren't speaking, I could hear CNN on in the background. And it was in English. I hoped they would be quiet for a little longer so I could get the info in a language that was a little more reassuring to me at that moment.

There was a lot of speculation that day on the radio. I'm sure it was that way in a lot of places. Then a short time later they announced the buildings had collapsed. They speculated that upwards of 30,000 may have been killed. By the time I got to my final destination it was pretty much over. We spent the rest of the night watching the news as they replayed the same footage over & over. I realized that things would never be the same on some level. This was my Pearl Harbor.

The next day I went out and bought a newspaper. I still have it. I still had to get back to Maryland but with air traffic suspended, I was in limbo for a few days. I flew space A and had planned on taking a military hop back to the US. I wasn't sure how that was going to impact my chances of finding an excess seat. I made it home a few days later than expected. I missed a few days of work.

It's hard to imagine that this occurred 18 years ago. Some events you just never forget.
 

mitzi

Well-Known Member
They just happened to be here filming the Fire Departments. The footage is really raw. At one point they both get lost from each other and have no idea if the other is still alive.

Do you all remember how eerie it was for days/weeks after when no planes were in the sky? And then when they started to fly again, how weird that felt? Especially when you saw one thinking it was flying really low...
Yes I do. The first one I saw was a night or two later. It was dark out and I was sitting on my deck. The sky was clear and lit by the moon. I saw a military jet low enough I could clearly see what it was below the angle of the moon. OMG it was a beautiful sight.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
I had flown to Italy the day before. I landed in Aviano then drove over to Vicenza where I got a room on base. I still had a ways to go to get to my final destination but I was tired and jet lagged so stopping and getting some rest made sense.

Given that there is a 6 hour time difference, I got a late start heading to NE Italy. I had the radio tuned to a station out of Milan. Every half hour they did a 5 minute news segment. Shortly after the first plane hit, when the news came on they announced a plane hit the building. They gave very little detail. My incorrect assumption was that it was a small plane. The news was very matter of fact and didn't suggest that this was something other than an unfortunate accident.

The music continued. The next news segment they announced that another plane had hit the adjacent tower. I have to translate what the said, and I thought that I had just misunderstood the Italian because to me it sounded like they said a 2nd plane hit the tower. But this time there was a lot more animation in the announcer's voice. Shortly he was joined by a colleague. They announce a plane has slammed into the Pentagon. Then I heard something that gave me chills, "L'America e sotto l'attacco (America is under attack).

My mom lives 15 miles from Manhattan. In junior high, on the 4th floor, you could see the skyline of Manhattan. On a clear day it looked like you could reach out and touch it. I tried calling but the operator told me that all the phone lines in the NYC/Northern NJ area were all jammed. Back in the car heading down the A4. The radio is no longer playing music. They are reporting that there are over a dozen planes that are airborne and aren't responding to the tower. I get that in the confusion, things are reported that turn out not to be true. At that moment I just thought that more planes were going to fall out of the sky.

1 more did crash and that would be the end of the carnage as far as planes were concerned. While listening to the radio, I had to translate what they said. In the moments where they weren't speaking, I could hear CNN on in the background. And it was in English. I hoped they would be quiet for a little longer so I could get the info in a language that was a little more reassuring to me at that moment.

There was a lot of speculation that day on the radio. I'm sure it was that way in a lot of places. Then a short time later they announced the buildings had collapsed. They speculated that upwards of 30,000 may have been killed. By the time I got to my final destination it was pretty much over. We spent the rest of the night watching the news as they replayed the same footage over & over. I realized that things would never be the same on some level. This was my Pearl Harbor.

The next day I went out and bought a newspaper. I still have it. I still had to get back to Maryland but with air traffic suspended, I was in limbo for a few days. I flew space A and had planned on taking a military hop back to the US. I wasn't sure how that was going to impact my chances of finding an excess seat. I made it home a few days later than expected. I missed a few days of work.

It's hard to imagine that this occurred 18 years ago. Some events you just never forget.
Did you talk with any of the local people?
 

RoseRed

American Beauty
PREMO Member
I was at work on base in a meeting. Our Competency Director came into the conference room to turn on the TV and that's how we all found out. I left about 30 minutes later to pick up my 2 y/o from daycare and went straight over to my sisters who had a 2 w/o. We sat watching the news all day until our husbands were due home. My husband and I had flown home from Boston the day before from visiting friends. The friends we visited had an Aunt that was on the next plane out from Boston that morning and was grounded on the flight line. Our neighbor, along with many others, were on travel on the west coast and had to rent a van to drive back across country. My cousins were stuck in Switzerland. And yes, the eeriness for days afterwards. It reminded me of the Loma Prieta Quake in 1989 (which I rode out - stuck in my car - under my 3 story office building in San Jose). The shock and disbelief was immense.
 

Burnthings

Member
I was in 7th grade. I walked into art class and the teacher already had the tv on because one building had already been hit. I remember cracking jokes about clowns piloting planes because everyone thought it was a crazy accident. Then the second plane hit and after some confusion the mood became alot more serious, more somber.

One period later we were sent back to our home rooms. They had rolled out the TVs and we watched as the buildings smoldered. Teachers talking among each other that we were watching history in real time. I remember the room there having the dull din of conversations until one of the first towers fell. "How could this happen". "Wow, no way!" Rang out from kids in the classroom.

My mom was actually one of the first to arrive as she worked on the base and we went home.

I remember sitting in my fathers small lounge in the garage with my family as we watched the news for the rest of the day.

I do recall stepping outside for a bit to watch the sky. The normally busy skys over pax were bare.

I don't really remember feeling scared, mostly just in a raised anticipation of what other events would fold out.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
I was at work on base in a meeting. Our Competency Director came into the conference room to turn on the TV and that's how we all found out. I left about 30 minutes later to pick up my 2 y/o from daycare and went straight over to my sisters who had a 2 w/o. We sat watching the news all day until our husbands were due home. My husband and I had flown home from Boston the day before from visiting friends. The friends we visited had an Aunt that was on the next plane out from Boston that morning and was grounded on the flight line. Our neighbor, along with many others, were on travel on the west coast and had to rent a van to drive back across country. My cousins were stuck in Switzerland. And yes, the eeriness for days afterwards. It reminded me of the Loma Prieta Quake in 1989 (which I rode out - stuck in my car - under my 3 story office building in San Jose). The shock and disbelief was immense.
Wow!
 

WingsOfGold

Active Member
I was in bed watching TV, my late day to go into work. I remember wishing I were able able to go back on active duty.
 

Lurk

Happy Creepy Ass Cracka
I was sitting in a command bunker in the midst of a "no-crap-this-is-real" nuclear weapons loading exercise on a B-52 base in Louisiana. Every BUFF was loaded with its mission load of cruise missiles and gravity bombs. While the airfield was filled with juicy sabotage targets, we were informed there was an unidentified, large aircraft making a beeline for our main runway. It takes about xxxxxxxxxxxx (cannot mention nuclear response times in public even if Hillary screwed the pooch and said this stuff on television) to unload nucs and put them safely into their bunkers. But we didn't know if Osama's boys had learned of our exercise (everyone in 100 miles knew it was happening) and had designated my chair as ground zero.

In the end we handed in the keys to our government vehicles so the President and leaders on Air Force One could drive to the headquarters building and assure the nation that all was under control.
 
I was sitting in a command bunker in the midst of a "no-crap-this-is-real" nuclear weapons loading exercise on a B-52 base in Louisiana. Every BUFF was loaded with its mission load of cruise missiles and gravity bombs. While the airfield was filled with juicy sabotage targets, we were informed there was an unidentified, large aircraft making a beeline for our main runway. It takes about xxxxxxxxxxxx (cannot mention nuclear response times in public even if Hillary screwed the pooch and said this stuff on television) to unload nucs and put them safely into their bunkers. But we didn't know if Osama's boys had learned of our exercise (everyone in 100 miles knew it was happening) and had designated my chair as ground zero.

In the end we handed in the keys to our government vehicles so the President and leaders on Air Force One could drive to the headquarters building and assure the nation that all was under control.
I watched a show on the History Channel last night that focused on events on Air Force One on 9/11. It was fascinating, and scary, to hear about the missteps, miscommunications, and unknowns between the various military and federal agencies and the White House re: issuing orders, what/where the President should be doing since he was in FL that morning at an elementary school, getting real-time information, etc. I didn't know Air Force One had stopped at the Louisiana base until I watched this show: they had footage of all the B-52s lined up because they were involved in an exercise. AF1 radioed ahead they were Code Alpha and a big plane but not who exactly they were. Requested 150,000 pounds of jet fuel, 70 box lunches, 40 gallons of coffee and 25 pounds of bananas. Then they realized it was AF1 coming in. Interviews with Bush, Cheney, etc. If you get a chance to catch this On Demand or whoever has it, it's well worth the time to watch. Called 9/11: Inside Air Force One I think.
 
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