Study gives depressing look at how climate change puts Americans’ mental health at risk

Salmon

Well-Known Member
Climate deniers are terrorists.

Is climate change stressing you out? A new study linking weather and mental health in the United States suggests things could get much worse.
The study outlines three separate ways that hotter and more extreme weather stand to undermine the mental well-being of the people forced to experience it. The effects will be most pronounced for women and for low-income Americans, the findings indicate.
http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-climate-change-mental-health-20181008-story.html?outputType=amp
 

Kyle

Having a Beer while the world burns!
PREMO Member
I'm sure you lefties mental health was stressed long before this global warming nonsense started.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
The climate nutters are clearly mental. I don't think we needed an official study to realize this.
 

Kyle

Having a Beer while the world burns!
PREMO Member
University of Minnesota neuroscientist Shmuel Lissek, who studies the fear system, believes that at its heart, the concept of doomsday evokes an innate and ancient bias in most mammals. "The initial response to any hint of alarm is fear. This is the architecture with which we’re built," Lissek says. Over evolutionary history, organisms with a better-safe-than-sorry approach survive. This mechanism has had consequences for both the body and brain, where the fast-acting amygdala can activate a fearful stress response before "higher" cortical areas have a chance to assess the situation and respond more rationally.

But why would anyone enjoy kindling this fearful response? Lissek suspects that some apocalyptic believers find the idea that the end is nigh to be validating. Individuals with a history of traumatic experiences, for example, may be fatalistic. For these people, finding a group of like-minded fatalists is reassuring. There may also be comfort in being able to attribute doom to some larger cosmic order—such as an ancient Mayan prophecy. This kind of mythology removes any sense of individual responsibility.


https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/psychology-reveals-the-comforts-of-the-apocalypse/
 

black dog

Free America
University of Minnesota neuroscientist Shmuel Lissek, who studies the fear system, believes that at its heart, the concept of doomsday evokes an innate and ancient bias in most mammals. "The initial response to any hint of alarm is fear. This is the architecture with which we’re built," Lissek says. Over evolutionary history, organisms with a better-safe-than-sorry approach survive. This mechanism has had consequences for both the body and brain, where the fast-acting amygdala can activate a fearful stress response before "higher" cortical areas have a chance to assess the situation and respond more rationally.

But why would anyone enjoy kindling this fearful response? Lissek suspects that some apocalyptic believers find the idea that the end is nigh to be validating. Individuals with a history of traumatic experiences, for example, may be fatalistic. For these people, finding a group of like-minded fatalists is reassuring. There may also be comfort in being able to attribute doom to some larger cosmic order—such as an ancient Mayan prophecy. This kind of mythology removes any sense of individual responsibility.


https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/psychology-reveals-the-comforts-of-the-apocalypse/

Apocalyptic... When that happens will I be able to wear my Iron Man 3 suit in public and not be mocked on my way to comic Con?

Asking for a friend....
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
How are women and the poor affected more harshly from weather variations?

I know women of a certain age get hot flashes but they pass after a few seconds.
 

Kyle

Having a Beer while the world burns!
PREMO Member
Apocalyptic... When that happens will I be able to wear my Iron Man 3 suit in public and not be mocked on my way to comic Con?

Asking for a friend....
Answering for a friend....

Underdog says Yes.
 

This_person

Well-Known Member
Who denies the climate changes?
It would be silly to deny that, of course.

Equally "of course" is that climate changes must be looked at on geological scale, not personal-calendar scale.

For example, here's a look at the temperature fluctuations over the past several million years. We can see we are in a relatively cool period, which is great for us.:

View attachment 125193

View attachment 125194




Note, that the CO2 levels have nothing to do with temperature changes, contrary to faulty public opinion. Also note that we are at about as low of CO2 levels as we have ever been.
 

Kyle

Having a Beer while the world burns!
PREMO Member
How are women and the poor affected more harshly from weather variations?

I know women of a certain age get hot flashes but they pass after a few seconds.
They're always cold.

Global warming should fix that.
 
If it makes you feel any better, the warmer we are going into 2020 the better off we'll be... share with your friends! :huggy:

https://www.livescience.com/61716-sun-cooling-global-warming.html

A periodic solar event called a "grand minimum" could overtake the sun perhaps as soon as 2020 and lasting through 2070, resulting in diminished magnetism, infrequent sunspot production and less ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching Earth — all bringing a cooler period to the planet that may span 50 years.
 
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