Stupid Question Time

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
I finally found a twelve pound turkey in the fresh meat section of the commissary. It was sitting among a bunch of packages labelled turkey breast and was the only one left. It feels like a whole turkey - I mean there is clearly something there that feels like legs and it says contains giblets, something or other, which I have always assumed are for decoration.

I have never purchased, nor cooked a fresh turkey. They have always been frozen and I knew what to expect. When I bought it I was thinking great if it's fresh it shouldn't be frozen and I can take the decorations out before I freeze it.

Now I'm not so sure - will the insides dry out if I pull that stuff out or- will the entire bird dry out or something? Is there a good way to re-wrap it to prevent that? It should be frozen now, it's too soon before Thanksgiving for the refrigerator right?

Thanks in advance.
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
What’s the expiration date? I wouldn’t freeze it, unless it expires before TG. It would take at least 2 days to unthaw in frig.
 

NorthBeachPerso

Honorary SMIB
I will tell you to buy a fresh turkey closer to Thanksgiving. the difference in taste and quality (may not be the exact right word) is discernible and, in my opinion (which is the only one that counts) worth the extra price.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
I will tell you to buy a fresh turkey closer to Thanksgiving. the difference in taste and quality (may not be the exact right word) is discernible and, in my opinion (which is the only one that counts) worth the extra price.
Yeah I read somewhere that they're supposed to taste better and I wasn't really as concerned about that as I was the size. All I could find everywhere today were huge turkeys - this one was the only one I found in the size I wanted. I went through the same thing last year - tried to wait until a few days before in order to get a fresh turkey but all they had left were gigantic.

At least I got the right size this year, but I really want to remove the goodie bag before I freeze it. Last year I spent a frustrating hour or two trying to chisel it out with a screwdriver. The turkey itself was pretty thawed out but the insides were like an iceberg. It was really frustrating.
 

littlelady

God bless the USA
That much I was able to find out - it has to be frozen. It's been purchased too far before Thanksgiving.
You could take out the giblets, rewrap the turkey, and freeze separately. Also, you can unthaw a turkey overnight by placing it in a bowl, or sink of cold water.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
You could take out the giblets, rewrap the turkey, and freeze separately. Also, you can unthaw a turkey overnight by placing it in a bowl, or sink of cold water.
What concerns me is that the turkey itself is in a sealed package that feels like there's water, turkey juice, I don't know something wet around it. If I remove the packaging to get the giblets out, I'll lose that wet stuff. If I lose the wet stuff, will the turkey dry out - does the wetness that is around the turkey right now serve a purpose?

And trust me you cannot thaw a turkey overnight by placing it in a bowl or sink or cold water. You might thaw the outside, but inside? Last year I ran warm water through the cavity. I chipped with a screwdriver. I ran more warm water. I finally ended up cooking it plastic and all in the oven and took it out every 20 minutes or so. It cooked three hours before I was finally able to free it.

PS - How is unthaw a word? I'm not making fun of you - I did the same thing in response, thought about it for a hot second, and corrected it. If you thaw something you are technically melting it right? How do you unmelt something? Weird.
 
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jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
PREMO Member
What concerns me is that the turkey itself is in a sealed package that feels like there's water, turkey juice, I don't know something wet around it. If I remove the packaging to get the giblets out, I'll lose that wet stuff. If I lose the wet stuff, will the turkey dry out - does the wetness that is around the turkey right now serve a purpose?
The wetness around it keeps the bird moist and prevents bacteria from growing. Removing that and the packaging allows bacteria to contaminate the bird. Freeze it as is then thaw it properly.

To thaw, figure out 30 minutes per pound in a cold water bath, changing the water every 30 minutes. For a 12 pound turkey, allow six hours. In the fridge, 1 day per 4 pounds so 3 days for a 12 pounder.

When in doubt, consult the experts!

 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
The wetness around it keeps the bird moist and prevents bacteria from growing. Removing that and the packaging allows bacteria to contaminate the bird. Freeze it as is then thaw it properly.

To thaw, figure out 30 minutes per pound in a cold water bath, changing the water every 30 minutes. For a 12 pound turkey, allow six hours. In the fridge, 1 day per 4 pounds so 3 days for a 12 pounder.

When in doubt, consult the experts!

And there's my answer about unwrapping - hadn't even given that a thought. I'll let you know how the cold water bath works out - haven't had much luck in the past. Thanks for getting back, appreciate it.
 

jazz lady

~*~ rara avis ~*~
PREMO Member
And there's my answer about unwrapping - hadn't even given that a thought. I'll let you know how the cold water bath works out - haven't had much luck in the past. Thanks for getting back, appreciate it.
You're welcome. The biggest mistake people make is NOT changing the water often enough!
 

Ken King

A little rusty but not crusty
PREMO Member
So I've heard - yuck too bloody. And what's with the neck. Last year my turkey had two necks stuffed inside - both equally gross. Never have figured that one out.
:lol: You cook the giblets and the neck (or in your previous experience the necks). Place them in water with diced celery, onions, and your preferred seasonings. Slow boil for about an hour. Remove from the water (save the water), allow to cool and then finely chop the giblets and pick the neck meat to return it to the water you saved. Use this with some turkey drippings to make your gravy. Some times a turkey gravy makings pack is included or you can use flour or cornstarch to thicken your gravy.
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
:lol: You cook the giblets and the neck (or in your previous experience the necks). Place them in water with diced celery, onions, and your preferred seasonings. Slow boil for about an hour. Remove from the water (save the water), allow to cool and then finely chop the giblets and pick the neck meat to return it to the water you saved. Use this with some turkey drippings to make your gravy. Some times a turkey gravy makings pack is included or you can use flour or cornstarch to thicken your gravy.
Oh God - you're kidding right?
 

RoseRed

American Beauty
PREMO Member
:lol: You cook the giblets and the neck (or in your previous experience the necks). Place them in water with diced celery, onions, and your preferred seasonings. Slow boil for about an hour. Remove from the water (save the water), allow to cool and then finely chop the giblets and pick the neck meat to return it to the water you saved. Use this with some turkey drippings to make your gravy. Some times a turkey gravy makings pack is included or you can use flour or cornstarch to thicken your gravy.
:yeahthat:
 

SailorGirl

Well-Known Member
Gizzard, heart, liver. And it makes the meal, especially with a half dozen or so biscuits. Damn, now I'm hungry again.
Testicles? Someone told me once that the giblets also consisted of turkey testicles. I remember thinking yeah sure they do. Just looked it up - turkeys have testicles. Who would eat something like that?

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