The Making of a Murderer (Netflix)

Christy

b*tch rocket
Apparently there is now a petition going around to give this guy and his nephew a Pardon. Woke up in the middle of the night to hear Nancy Grace losing her #### over it. :lol: She seems to be heavily invested in his guilt.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
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I don't really care whether he killed that girl or not - I'm totally okay with him being behind bars, based on his known criminal history. Anyone who thinks this guy should be free, great - take him into your home then and see how that works out for you.
 

Hank

my war
After watching a marathon viewing of the program, at first I was bouncing off the walls in disbelief that he and his nephew were in jail. Then after all the calls for petition and such it brought me back down to rational thinking. Most documentaries are slanted to fit the filmmakers agenda and in true crime type docs, also slanted to create the hype that this has created. I think he did it. I think the the cops did do some shady tactics to ensure his guilt. The only thing I question is how much the nephew was involved. Any logical person will concede that you can't get all the info from a crime in 10 hours of TV.
 

Christy

b*tch rocket
I don't really care whether he killed that girl or not - I'm totally okay with him being behind bars, based on his known criminal history. Anyone who thinks this guy should be free, great - take him into your home then and see how that works out for you.
He has his own home, he doesn't need me to take him into it. :wink:

I have to respectfully disagree with your thought process on it being perfectly okay to put a person in jail for something that they did not do, or that it is perfectly okay for the judicial system to fudge the facts and force false confessions.
 

Christy

b*tch rocket
After watching a marathon viewing of the program, at first I was bouncing off the walls in disbelief that he and his nephew were in jail. Then after all the calls for petition and such it brought me back down to rational thinking. Most documentaries are slanted to fit the filmmakers agenda and in true crime type docs, also slanted to create the hype that this has created. I think he did it. I think the the cops did do some shady tactics to ensure his guilt. The only thing I question is how much the nephew was involved. Any logical person will concede that you can't get all the info from a crime in 10 hours of TV.
I agree that it is slanted, but you still can't discount the police and prosecution shenanigans. It is my belief that his nephew's brother and step father did it and pinned it on Steve Avery. The whole bunch is a hot mess, and I truly do feel bad for the nephew, what has been done to him is terrible.

I like reading the different theories on Reddit. It's pretty interesting.
 

Hank

my war
I agree that it is slanted, but you still can't discount the police and prosecution shenanigans. It is my belief that his nephew's brother and step father did it and pinned it on Steve Avery. The whole bunch is a hot mess, and I truly do feel bad for the nephew, what has been done to him is terrible.

I like reading the different theories on Reddit. It's pretty interesting.
Oh, total corruption, no doubt. The timing of the lawsuit and crime as well as the involvement of that Police Department for the murder was shady as Hell.

This reminds me of The Paradise Lost docs. A lot of strange characters and weaves of the story.
 
H

Hodr

Guest
Apparently there is now a petition going around to give this guy and his nephew a Pardon. Woke up in the middle of the night to hear Nancy Grace losing her #### over it. :lol: She seems to be heavily invested in his guilt.
That's her thing. Everyone is guilty, all the time. Especially men.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
Patron
I have to respectfully disagree with your thought process on it being perfectly okay to put a person in jail for something that they did not do, or that it is perfectly okay for the judicial system to fudge the facts and force false confessions.
I can understand how you might feel that way if you'd only watched the TV show. But if you go back and research the actual court documents and public records, along with testimony, you would come away with a different impression and be glad that Steven Avery is imprisoned.
 

Christy

b*tch rocket
I can understand how you might feel that way if you'd only watched the TV show. But if you go back and research the actual court documents and public records, along with testimony, you would come away with a different impression and be glad that Steven Avery is imprisoned.

Well that's the thing. I have gone back and done the research. Have you? It's all very interesting.

I also think you mistake my interest for some misguided adoration of Steven Avery, which is inaccurate. I don't think anyone disputes the fact that he is a white trash #######. I mean he tortured a cat for crying out loud. All of this does not negate the fact that the police, the prosecution, hell, even the public defenders, were shady as all get out.

For me, the story is bigger than Steve Avery and his nephew. It hits at the heart of how easily human beings are corrupted, especially when convinced that they are righteous. JMHO. :shrug:
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
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All of this does not negate the fact that the police, the prosecution, hell, even the public defenders, were shady as all get out.
I haven't seen the show so I can't make an opinion. I just get tired of these "wrongly convicted :jameo:" stories that act like it could happen to anyone. Some perfectly average law abiding person sitting there having dinner with his family when the cops come busting in, make up a bunch of charges, plant evidence, and BOOM! A solid citizen and doting father is in the slammer being sodomized by prison guards. I call it "Shawshank Syndrome".

When you look at these "wrongly convicted" people, they're almost always ####bags who should have been locked up or executed long ago. They might not have committed that particular crime, but they are not innocent by any stretch and I can't feel too terrible that they're off the street. The only bad news is that there's some other ####bag still out there, but at least one of them is behind bars so that's still progress.
 

Dakota

~~~~~~~
I walked away with a completely different perspective than has been mentioned here so far. To me, this documentary shows how somebody who has no money and is assigned a public defender is completely railroaded. The nephew should not have been found guilty as the only evidence they had against him was some highly questionable coerced confession. There was no DNA evidence found inside the house that made the nephew’s “CONFESSION” plausible, in fact, there was no evidence the nephew had even been in his house because even his DNA didn’t exist. He needs to be released and given a new trial outside that jurisdiction and prior to court, if I was his defense counsel, I would have that confession completely tossed. Betcha without it, they wouldn’t even attempt to try and prosecute him again. The narcissist prick of a prosecutor who was later disbarred for sexually harassing victims in cases he was working on ONLY had that confession to use at trial on the nephew.

As for Steve Avery, he had made a settlement out of desperation which yielded him $400K for a defense team. As smart as I think his team is, I could not believe the amount of press conferences that went on during the trial or the fact that none of the witnesses were sequestered during his trial. The importance of sequestering witnesses is that one does not change the scope of their testimony based on another person’s testimony they heard in court. Some of the evidence presented against Avery was questionable. The car key, missed SEVEN TIMES, during various searches was found by the shadiest of characters involved in the 1st law suit. This SINGLE (think about that, who carries only 1 car key on your everyday keys? I hate keys but I have 5 on my ring – because I have to have these 5 keys), car key did not have the deceased person’s DNA, only Avery’s. This was a cloth textured key ring. It would HAVE TO HAVE the DNA of the deceased on it if she carried it around on the daily and they didn’t find it the other 6 times they searched his house? I don’t buy that at all. The so called “bullet evidence” was contaminated and should have been tossed out. He could have very well killed her but some of the evidence they used against him was obviously, in my opinion, staged. He didn’t kill her by shackling her to the bed in his trailer and taking her out to the garage and shooting her. There is no way that happened. Avery was a sloppy pig and the garage and house was filthy.

I was well-aware of this case long before the Netflix documentary because they have covered it in detail on Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community :)dork:) so if anything seeing the injustice of the way the legal system handled both these convictions and the nature of the evidence, I can honestly say I have reasonable doubt.
 

migtig

aka Mrs. Giant
One of the recommended docu-dramas in one of my nerd groups was called "There's something wrong with Aunt Diane". Now the reason it was recommended was to watch it with your analytical mind and try not to get too caught up in the emotions. It was emotional. Even going into watching it with this mindset, I still found myself trying to figure it out possible other scenarios, and empathizing with family members. My husband watched it with me without this pre-awareness, was doing the same of trying deeply to rationalize other scenarios that caused this to occur, when he has one of the most analytical minds I know. It was difficult to accept that the facts were the facts. It's really that simple. Our human empathy and the emotions of those involved with any given scenario are likely to sway us away from the facts, whether we think they will or not. Even when the worst case scenario is the fact based scenario, we don't want to accept that of others. We wouldn't act that way our emotions/mind/heart say.

So after that experience, I notice I am less likely to put a "what if" spin on things, regardless of the manner the material is presented to me. I have seen a lot of hype on this particular show and wonder how much emotions are coming into play for the people making their rationalization of other scenarios.
 

Dakota

~~~~~~~
I mean he tortured a cat for crying out loud.
He should have served life in prision for this. He dipped the cat in oil or greese and tossed it in the fire. It was a family pet.

Cats lives matter. :mad:

Avery also did his fair share of minimizing that incident which makes me highly suspect his mental status.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
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He should have served life in prision for this. He dipped the cat in oil or greese and tossed it in the fire. It was a family pet.

Cats lives matter. :mad:

Avery also did his fair share of minimizing that incident which makes me highly suspect his mental status.
Which is why I can't get too upset even if he *was* wrongly convicted. I think we can all agree that Steven Avery is a ####bag mental case, even without the cat torturing, and should be locked up.
 

vraiblonde

Board Mommy
PREMO Member
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"There's something wrong with Aunt Diane".
Whenever that documentary comes up I feel this need to punch the husband right in his throat. After proclaiming his drunken druggie of a wife's innocence, he went on to sue the state of New York for not keeping their roads safe, and his BIL for being the owner of the van his wife was driving when she killed everybody. Because, see, it's their fault.

Grrr....

Anyway, most of the time what we see is what it is. It's when we start what-ifing and conjecturing that we get hosed up.
 
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