The School crisis is about to go Defcon 4

Hessian

Well-Known Member
I hope everybody is enjoying Summer break but there is a storm on the horizon...It is the 2022-23 school year across America.

* I have already heard of a state dropping certification standards just to recruit teachers.
* I am sure other compromises are underway. Recruitment bonuses are posted....and thus districts will demand more $$ from recession-bound communities.
* The student counts in classrooms will overwhelm many teachers... who are coming off the C19 panic policies & ineffective zoom-based lessons. Morale will continue to fall.
* Less college students are entering teaching....and their 'student teaching' experiences were often in remote learning environments...how will they do in front of 29 7th graders? A colleague posted data of soaring resignations in Rochester NY schools... greater than multiple years combined!
* Testing over the past three years has been spotty...but the results that have been gathered?...Monumental deficiencies in math & reading have emerged...how will teachers compensate? (Montgomery Cnty Schools-Md)
* Private schools are very hesitant to raise tuition due to the financial crisis that has been created by governmental policies. THUS...pay will not match inflation, books will not be replaced, programs may be reduced & more sacrifices will have to be made by faculty.
* Unions will feel the membership's frustrations and may be prompted to do anything from work-to-the-rule, sick-outs, or even outright strike.
* The plea for more Bus drivers has been very serious through last year....and judging by the number of signs I have seen, it has not improved. I know morale among drivers has also been a problem. It leads me to believe.....School transport in many districts is seriously strained.

So...I am not a meteorologist, but I KNOW a storm is coming...and the clouds have already arrived. Expect the first lashing to appear by Labor day.
 

Hessian

Well-Known Member
Anne Arundel...
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OccamsRazor

Well-Known Member
Top 3 complaints from teachers I know:
1) MONEY!!!
2) Absolutely, positively, NO backing from the administration or school board.
3) Prime subject teachers giving too much homework (mainly from extracurricular teachers a.k.a Music, Phys Ed, etc.)
 

Hessian

Well-Known Member
Nope my daughters Tuition went up
Likely....but private schools have the tipping point question....How many families will we lose if the tuition is raised, and thus...will we make budget or have to make additional cuts!
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
I give credit to the honest teachers trying to make a difference. The under the radar indoctrinators can go pound sand.

I had a shipmate that became a teacher after she got out of the navy. She teaches in a semi-rural area of Florida, not too far from Jacksonville. She told me she chose that school district because the kids in that area are still taught manners. Students address adults as Sir & Maam. There, the few rotten apples are only found after having to dig through the entire barrel. Parent involvement also helps. I met another guy whose daughter became a 1st year teacher in a middle school in downtown Jacksonville. She hated it and quit midyear in March. 7 months of that showed her that clearly she was in the wrong business. It wasn't the school work that ran her off. It was the kids' behaviors.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

Top 3 complaints from teachers I know:
1) MONEY!!!
2) Absolutely, positively, NO backing from the administration or school board.
3) Prime subject teachers giving too much homework (mainly from extracurricular teachers a.k.a Music, Phys Ed, etc.)
1) Money? It's always about moar money. They can never get enough, in addition to a very generous health and benefits package. There are teachers raking in near $100,000 a year with only 12-15 years teaching. $100,000! And if you think that amount is ok, then you, (the people), are part of the problem.
2) There will never be a change in backing from administrations or school boards, because the chaos from that lack of student discipline enforcement ties into the moar money mantra. If the unions really cared for their members, they would be in the fight to make such changes in the system. But they won't, as their only function is to secure moar money, and benefits for their members. Teachers, if they could/would ever band together, strike, outside of their controlling unions, could actually effect the change they they complain about. But, that will never happen because, then, their job will get easier. negating increases/demands for moar money.

Let's face it. Today. There are no teachers. There are no "educators". What we have are regurgitators. Plain and simple. There is no need for anyone, in such a position, to need a degree, or any continuing education degrees, to perform in their position. It's all a sham, a hoax, a mocking of everyone's sensibilities. It is time we kick these grifters off the pedestal they have been put on.
 
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OccamsRazor

Well-Known Member
For your consideration ...


1) Money? It's always about moar money. They can never get enough, in addition to a very generous health and benefits package. There are teachers raking in near $100,000 a year with only 12-15 years teaching. $100,000! And if you think that amount is ok, then you, (the people), are part of the problem.
You're right! No one with 12-15 years experience, a Master's Degree, and advanced certifications within their discipline deserves $100K/year! :sarcasm:
I'd be willing to bet a paycheck that there are several people on this very forum that have NO degree and less experience that make that much or more.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
For your consideration ...

You're right! No one with 12-15 years experience, a Master's Degree, and advanced certifications within their discipline deserves $100K/year! :sarcasm:
I'd be willing to bet a paycheck that there are several people on this very forum that have NO degree and less experience that make that much or more.
Whoopi effing du! We are taking about people that PRODUCE nothing, except woke propagandized youth graduating with 9th grade education levels, and where over 50% of these students require remedial classes in english and math when going to collage. Up to 60% can't even get the minimum score of 50 on the Armed Forces aptitude battery test where there is only 35-40% pass rate.

Those on this forum that make $100,000 or more, with no degree, or lessor degrees, or less experience, at least produce something. Unlike the freeloaders, (the majority of teachers), we have today now called "educators".
 

OccamsRazor

Well-Known Member
For your consideration ...


Whoopi effing du! We are taking about people that PRODUCE nothing, except woke propagandized youth graduating with 9th grade education levels, and where over 50% of these students require remedial classes in english and math when going to collage. Up to 60% can't even get the minimum score of 50 on the Armed Forces aptitude battery test where there is only 35-40% pass rate.

Those on this forum that make $100,000 or more, with no degree, or lessor degrees, or less experience, at least produce something. Unlike the freeloaders, (the majority of teachers), we have today now called "educators".
Perhaps it is the SYSTEM that is screwed up and not the teachers? As shown by what I highlighted above. Unless you are saying that teachers have been screwed up since YOU were in school. :rolleyes:
 

Hessian

Well-Known Member
For your consideration ...


Whoopi effing du! We are taking about people that PRODUCE nothing, except woke propagandized youth graduating with 9th grade education levels, and where over 50% of these students require remedial classes in english and math when going to collage. Up to 60% can't even get the minimum score of 50 on the Armed Forces aptitude battery test where there is only 35-40% pass rate.

Those on this forum that make $100,000 or more, with no degree, or lessor degrees, or less experience, at least produce something. Unlike the freeloaders, (the majority of teachers), we have today now called "educators".
LightRoasted....do you think there is a need/want for educators that can tutor potential recruits in the weeks before the aptitude battery exams? I might even quit the classroom if I could tutor 3-5 potential recruits a week in preparation for their exams/essays. Don't know who would pay the salary though.
BTW...I have never made more than 53K a year after 36 years in the classroom, with Masters equivalent....yeah I know...I must be doing something wrong. Oh well.
 

rio

Well-Known Member
I don't know where the teachers are that LightRoasted says make 100k a year. They aren't in SMC. I know teachers that have over 25 years experience that don't make that amount. Administrators, yes, they make over 100k/year.

All I know is LR must be very busy and never sleep to be able to keep up with being a woman, a teacher, a repairman, and an expert on everything in between.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
I don't know where the teachers are that LightRoasted says make 100k a year. They aren't in SMC. I know teachers that have over 25 years experience that don't make that amount. Administrators, yes, they make over 100k/year
My sis and her daughter (my niece..duh) are both teachers in rural southern VA. Both have college degrees...sis from Va Tech and niece from Longwood. Sis will be retiring in 3 years and currently pulls down a whopping 58K/year. She'd be making less but in addition to teaching her regular classes she also takes care of the Ag program greenhouses and animal husbandry program chicken coops etc.. She puts in an average of 70 hours per week when school is in session.


Niece teaches Biology...beena teacher for less than 10 years so probably makes around 48K annually.
 
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SamSpade

Well-Known Member
I don't know where the gaps are, in teaching. I do however think there may be entirely too much attention given to the requirements of teaching that aren't wholly grounded in the subject matter of the stuff that is taught - hence, you have teachers teaching biology, chemistry and trig who only learned the stuff the night before - because they're not biologists, chemists and mathematicians.

I do however, think that there's a burden placed on teachers on how to deal with students who are mouthy, vulgar and disrespectful. They disrupt classes and start fights. They SHOULD be expelled - but the schools don't want to do that anymore. In this respect, they throw the teachers under the bus.
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
- hence, you have teachers teaching biology, chemistry and trig who only learned the stuff the night before - because they're not biologists, chemists and mathematicians.
I guess I should remain very thankfull that none of that generalization ever applied to the teachers I had in HS....the ones that did a fantastic job of preparing me for a rigorous curriculum at one of the countries top engineering schools. Has it really changed that much?..and where?

Compared to ...say..worthless slugs like Hemirhoid that spout all the BS about how smort they are, but didn't get past community college. ;-)
 
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Hessian

Well-Known Member
AND...I believe all of you are familiar with the lack of cooperation, integrity, and responsibility that flourished during the ZOOM teaching months. I had mixed classes...8 in class, 20 on Zoom and tried to teach from my desk & camera.
Perhaps younger, more connected & creative teachers could handle that better...but it was grueling day after day trying to check digital submissions, re-submissions, attendance & tech glitches, having students do presentations remotely....and having to wipe desks vigorously between each class so the kids don't catch the Wuhan Red death.

I am VERY certain that covid killed the careers of thousands of experienced senior teachers who just were overwhelmed. We lost many qualified, dedicated professionals...all due to US Paid for, Chinese gain-of-function, completely mishandled outbreak & associated lies.
 

Hessian

Well-Known Member
I guess I should remain very thankfull that none of that generalization ever applied to the teachers I had in HS....the ones that did a fantastic job of preparing me for a rigorous curriculum at one of the countries top engineering schools. Has it really changed that much?..and where?
Its pretty hard to find HS science & math teachers today...us History teachers are just hanging out,...hoping we don't get replaced by a Zoom program from Sacramento.:tap:
 

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member
Its pretty hard to find HS science & math teachers today...us History teachers are just hanging out,...hoping we don't get replaced by a Zoom program from Sacramento.:tap:
I can see why that would be true. Too many companies needing that kind of talent that pay far more than school systems do.
 
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