Three St. Mary’s County Family Members Facing Federal Charges For Stealing Over $820,000 In V.A. Benefits Fraud Scheme

jazz lady

~*~ Rara Avis ~*~
PREMO Member

Gilligan

#*! boat!
PREMO Member

Wow. :faint:
Wow, indeed!
 

limblips

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
I wonder how the falsely accused is doing?

"Farr received a service-connected disability rating of 70% based on fraudulent documentation she submitted, which purported that she suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder from an incident in which she was raped by another serviceman. Farr admitted to local law enforcement to fabricating the incident."
 

BernieP

Resident PIA
I commented anger and disgust :)
I don't think they should be sent to prison, that's too good for them.
Instead they should have to face real combat veterans who are fight with the VA to get treatment for real medical problems received from military service - age is not a factor.

Something tells me they would not be walking out of the room.
 

officeguy

Well-Known Member
What makes this so aggravating is the fact that there are folks with multiple tours in conflict areas who have real service related disabilities yet have to fight the VA at every corner. And then you have these criminals who barely made it past in-processing who turn it into a lifelong rent payment. Disgusting.
 

PeaceBay

New Member
😡 I've got a relative who stayed inside his Florida home for 2 years straight during the day. Just to prove he was disabled. As soon as he got 100% VA Disability, him and his wife took off for a worldwide backpacking vacation!
(Yes I'd report him but don't know current multi-hyphened last name).
Also know someone here aiming for disability though his wife can't say he didn't have same symptoms before service.
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
What makes this so aggravating is the fact that there are folks with multiple tours in conflict areas who have real service related disabilities yet have to fight the VA at every corner. And then you have these criminals who barely made it past in-processing who turn it into a lifelong rent payment. Disgusting.
My wife, who was in Kuwait when Iraqui forces attacked and overran the country, struggled with the VA for several years before gaining a determination for her service connected injuries.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

😡 I've got a relative who stayed inside his Florida home for 2 years straight during the day. Just to prove he was disabled. As soon as he got 100% VA Disability, him and his wife took off for a worldwide backpacking vacation!
(Yes I'd report him but don't know current multi-hyphened last name). Also know someone here aiming for disability though his wife can't say he didn't have same symptoms before service.
I believe you are projecting here. Are you privy to every detail of his VA service-connected claim? Exactly what would you report on? Do you have physical evidence, not hearsay, that would counter anything? Did you serve with him his entire time in the service? I can tell you, from people I know, that the time from when a claim is filed, to before a claim is finalized, to be a most stressful time for many, and a financial nightmare due to not being able to work or cope with any employment. Having to visit the VA for C&P, (Compensation and Pension), exams and testing. Going from VA doctor to VA doctor. Compiling one's medical records history. Locating those one has served with, getting letters to backup the claim. I don't think you fully understand the stress the entire process can have on a person. And then the ever long waits. Maybe, you are just jealous? Envious?
 

PeaceBay

New Member
I am neither jealous not envious.
I am concerned about veterans who do need Disability benefits (and have to go through what you described) while others are taking advantage of the system.
IF people didn't take advantage of the system it would be better for those who need it - time would be shortened, doctors would be more inclined to believe individuals. Also this relative was saying he suffered physical disability when none was apparent when I lived in the same house with him for 6 months; South Florida, staying inside all day to look deadly white and going out every night clubbing. Sister was financially supporting him and finances weren't an issue. Then he immediately goes backpacking around the world once he gets 100% Disability? Weird.

I feel bad for service members who need it, especially in this area where they have to go all the way to DC.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
I'll never understand the VA, my grandfather was missing part of a hand and foot from a Japanese attack, never took anything from the VA and I see someone getting 100% for depression.
 

officeguy

Well-Known Member
I'll never understand the VA, my grandfather was missing part of a hand and foot from a Japanese attack, never took anything from the VA and I see someone getting 100% for depression.
There are folks who have a 100% VA disability yet are able to pass a first class medical every 6 months to fly for an airline. There are others with a medical discharge and high % disability rating who pass the physical tests to become career firefighters or cops. Part of the problem is how the VA adds different percentages without a process that looks at the overall ability to hold meaningful employment. Lots of little things can add up to a high rating when the person in front of you is still able to do all the things required do do a regular job.
It's a system that rewards those who know how fill out forms and answer questions in just the right way to qualify under 5 different categories. A few percent for 'loss of range of motion',. a few percent for a meniscus torn while playing basketball. A contact dermatitis from some maintenance grease and suddenly you have 75% total.
 

LightRoasted

If I may ...
If I may ...

I'll never understand the VA, my grandfather was missing part of a hand and foot from a Japanese attack, never took anything from the VA and I see someone getting 100% for depression.
Maybe he never filed for a claim? The VA is not proactive. In that it does not search out veterans that might have a claim.

There are folks who have a 100% VA disability yet are able to pass a first class medical every 6 months to fly for an airline. There are others with a medical discharge and high % disability rating who pass the physical tests to become career firefighters or cops. Part of the problem is how the VA adds different percentages without a process that looks at the overall ability to hold meaningful employment. Lots of little things can add up to a high rating when the person in front of you is still able to do all the things required do do a regular job.
It's a system that rewards those who know how fill out forms and answer questions in just the right way to qualify under 5 different categories. A few percent for 'loss of range of motion',. a few percent for a meniscus torn while playing basketball. A contact dermatitis from some maintenance grease and suddenly you have 75% total.
It is a disability, "rating", for compensation purposes, for money that is calculated for the loss of the potential earnings measured over a veteran's working lifetime. In addition to no-charge medical care. Ever been injected with experimental vaccines? Even been exposed to burn pits? Ever been exposed to environmental toxins on an everyday basis? Ever been exposed to nerve agents delivered by the enemy, or unknowingly detonated by EOD personnel, (with little or no mention in the media)? Ever been exposed to agent orange? Ever been exposed to, and ingested, depleted uranium microscopic dust after the projectile disintegrates upon impact of its target? Have you ever had to bag the mangled body of a man in your squad? Ever held a man in your lap while sitting on the ground reassuring him everything was going to be ok while you watched the life ebb out of his body? Ever been exposed to the constant after effects, and seeing the results, of your rifle fire, grenades, etc, upon the enemy body?

For Vietnam veterans. Agent Orange presumptive diseases. Chronic B-cell leukemia: A type of cancer that affects your white blood cells (cells in your body’s immune system that help to fight off illnesses and infections) Hodgkin’s disease: A type of cancer that causes your lymph nodes, liver, and spleen to get bigger and your red blood cells to decrease (called anemia) Multiple myeloma: A type of cancer that affects your plasma cells (white blood cells made in your bone marrow that help to fight infection) Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: A group of cancers that affect the lymph glands and other lymphatic tissue (a part of your immune system that helps to fight infection and illness) Prostate cancer: Cancer of the prostate (the gland in men that helps to make semen) Respiratory cancers (including lung cancer): Cancers of the organs involved in breathing (including the lungs, larynx, trachea, and bronchus) Soft tissue sarcomas (other than osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, or mesothelioma): Different types of cancers in body tissues such as muscle, fat, blood and lymph vessels, and connective tissues. AL amyloidosis: A rare illness that happens when an abnormal protein (called amyloid) builds up in your body’s tissues, nerves, or organs (like your heart, kidneys, or liver) and causes damage over time Chloracne (or other types of acneiform disease like it): A skin condition that happens soon after contact with chemicals and looks like acne often seen in teenagers. Under our rating regulations, it must be at least 10% disabling within 1 year of contact with herbicides. Diabetes mellitus type 2: An illness that happens when your body is unable to properly use insulin (a hormone that turns blood glucose, or sugar, into energy), leading to high blood sugar levels. Ischemic heart disease: A type of heart disease that happens when your heart doesn’t get enough blood (and the oxygen the blood carries). It often causes chest pain or discomfort. Parkinson’s disease: An illness of the nervous system (the network of nerves and fibers that send messages between your brain and spinal cord and other areas of your body) that affects your muscles and movement—and gets worse over time. Peripheral neuropathy, early onset: An illness of the nervous system that causes numbness, tingling, and weakness. Porphyria cutanea tarda: A rare illness that can make your liver stop working the way it should and can cause your skin to thin and blister when you’re out in the sun.

For those that served in the Navy during Vietnam on ships. The Blue Water Navy (BWN) Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 (PL 116-23) extended the presumption of herbicide exposure, such as Agent Orange, to Veterans who served in the offshore waters of the Republic of Vietnam between Jan. 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975.

For those that served in the Gulf War. The VA presumes certain medically unexplained illnesses are related to Gulf War service without regard to cause. These include: chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and undiagnosed illnesses with symptoms that may include but are not limited to: abnormal weight loss, cardiovascular disease, muscle and joint pain, headache, menstrual disorders, neurological and psychological problems, skin conditions, respiratory disorders, and sleep disturbances.

For current veterans. Since there is no current presumptive service connection, veterans must file claims for direct service connection for diseases and illnesses related to burn pit exposure. In order to establish direct service connection for a related illness or disease, there must be (1) medical evidence of a current disability; (2) evidence of burn pit exposure; and (3) evidence of a nexus between the burn pit exposure and the current disability.

Add also the mental aspect. PTSD. A very real condition that changes a person's outlook and behavior. Why do you think so many veterans commit suicide? Or become alcoholics? Or drug users?

Now, I don't know about you? But I would wager that just by looking at any of the above veterans, with any of the listed ailments, that filed claims and were granted a disability rating, even up to 100%, you would not be able to see a visible injury or disability.

Are there those that game the system? Sure. Are there those that game Social Security? Sure. Are there those that game welfare? Sure. Are there those that game any government benefit program? Sure. But do not just assume, because you cannot see a visible injury or disability on a veteran, that that veteran isn't dealing with one. Because you do not know what that veteran has been through.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
LR your post is too long to quote so pretend the quote is here.

Those conditions are very real and those veterans deserve to be taken care of. I see people with real problems saying they can't get any help, then I see those that just use it for an additional income stream.

My grandfather said "I'm not disabled" he was a very successful man in life.

I know combat vets that were actually shot that get nothing and they see others with good civil service jobs brag about their additional income stream. To me getting fat after the service or becoming depressed from being yelled at by superior should not compare.

As far as I can tell the VA is doing a poor job taking care of those that need it the most. And gets scammed easily by people that know the right things to say and how to navigate the waters.
 

MiddleGround

Well-Known Member
Are there those that game the system? Sure. Are there those that game Social Security? Sure. Are there those that game welfare? Sure. Are there those that game any government benefit program? Sure. But do not just assume, because you cannot see a visible injury or disability on a veteran, that that veteran isn't dealing with one. Because you do not know what that veteran has been through.
All of your comments are relative and to the point. However,.......

I can say with great certainty that there are MANY people gaming the system. I have seen several and spoke to several people who are collecting military retirement, civilian retirement, 100% disability benefits, AND.. they are still working full time in physically demanding jobs.

The point is... if you are 100% disabled... how can you be performing physically demanding duties on the job?
 

MiddleGround

Well-Known Member
I know a guy who was injured while in the Marines. Had some really bad damage done to his back. The VA diagnosed him with "Degenerative discs" and he has 2 that are herniated.

Initially, he was given a 30% disability rating. Mind you that this person can no longer stand for long periods of time and/or lift anything over 40 pounds.

Recently, he received a letter in the mail from the VA stating that his benefit level was being decreased due to his rating being lowered to 10%

How exactly can his rating level be dropped when his condition was and is diagnosed as "Degenerative?" :sshrug: Doesn't that mean, by its very nature and definition, that it get WORSE over time??
 
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