VA disability chatter

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
I didn't want to gum up a different thread where a few folks were discussing VA disability.

When I served, I had to stand quarterdeck watch. In dress shoes. Standing on a steel deck. They had mats but no way could you stand in 1 small area the entire time. At the end of a 4 hour watch, often my feet hurt and my toes would be numb. I went to medical and they fixed me up. Had surgery and they never bothered me again.

On a P3 flight from Miami to Jacksonville, we hit some really rough weather. I was moving around when the plane lost lift. We dropped like a stone. For a half second I was weightless. Then I slammed into the overhead. When the plane caught lift again, I fell to the deck like I was sitting in a chair. Ass first. When it was safe to move I bolted for my ditching station. I jumped over a guy that was on the floor screaming in pain. He ended up with a 65% compressed disk. For months after he wore this plastic thing that looked like a turtle shell. They said I had lumbar and cervical strains. I was very stiff for a few days. But my lower back ached for a while.

When I got out of the service, I did the exit exam with the VA. They gave me credit for my fixed feet. Yet my feet didn't bother me for years. They denied that my backache was service related. Yet it was in my records. Plus my back did and still does give me issues. They said I could appeal but I figured it would be like pissing in the wind.

So that's my story. I did have a guy that I served with tell me that I should tell the VA I'm an alcoholic. I guess he knew people that figured out a story to get to 100%. No need to make stuff up. But I can understand how the system can be abused. Just like any other government program that provides funds to people. Some are always going to find a way to get over. And some that deserve it will go without because of many different reasons.
 

Clem72

Well-Known Member
I didn't want to gum up a different thread where a few folks were discussing VA disability.

When I served, I had to stand quarterdeck watch. In dress shoes. Standing on a steel deck. They had mats but no way could you stand in 1 small area the entire time. At the end of a 4 hour watch, often my feet hurt and my toes would be numb. I went to medical and they fixed me up. Had surgery and they never bothered me again.

On a P3 flight from Miami to Jacksonville, we hit some really rough weather. I was moving around when the plane lost lift. We dropped like a stone. For a half second I was weightless. Then I slammed into the overhead. When the plane caught lift again, I fell to the deck like I was sitting in a chair. Ass first. When it was safe to move I bolted for my ditching station. I jumped over a guy that was on the floor screaming in pain. He ended up with a 65% compressed disk. For months after he wore this plastic thing that looked like a turtle shell. They said I had lumbar and cervical strains. I was very stiff for a few days. But my lower back ached for a while.

When I got out of the service, I did the exit exam with the VA. They gave me credit for my fixed feet. Yet my feet didn't bother me for years. They denied that my backache was service related. Yet it was in my records. Plus my back did and still does give me issues. They said I could appeal but I figured it would be like pissing in the wind.

So that's my story. I did have a guy that I served with tell me that I should tell the VA I'm an alcoholic. I guess he knew people that figured out a story to get to 100%. No need to make stuff up. But I can understand how the system can be abused. Just like any other government program that provides funds to people. Some are always going to find a way to get over. And some that deserve it will go without because of many different reasons.
Appreciate the story. I know obviously not everyone is a scammer. I used to work with a guy named one-legged-Tony who lost both hid legs in the first gulf war. I think he said he only had 30 percent, and fought to get that just so he would have hiring preference in civil service.
 

PeoplesElbow

Well-Known Member
It seems persistence is the key. I hear about people that can't get much for things like a mangled hand but others that kept at it get benefits for stuff like being fat and having ED.
 

black dog

Free America
I didn't want to gum up a different thread where a few folks were discussing VA disability.

When I served, I had to stand quarterdeck watch. In dress shoes. Standing on a steel deck. They had mats but no way could you stand in 1 small area the entire time. At the end of a 4 hour watch, often my feet hurt and my toes would be numb. I went to medical and they fixed me up. Had surgery and they never bothered me again.

On a P3 flight from Miami to Jacksonville, we hit some really rough weather. I was moving around when the plane lost lift. We dropped like a stone. For a half second I was weightless. Then I slammed into the overhead. When the plane caught lift again, I fell to the deck like I was sitting in a chair. Ass first. When it was safe to move I bolted for my ditching station. I jumped over a guy that was on the floor screaming in pain. He ended up with a 65% compressed disk. For months after he wore this plastic thing that looked like a turtle shell. They said I had lumbar and cervical strains. I was very stiff for a few days. But my lower back ached for a while.

When I got out of the service, I did the exit exam with the VA. They gave me credit for my fixed feet. Yet my feet didn't bother me for years. They denied that my backache was service related. Yet it was in my records. Plus my back did and still does give me issues. They said I could appeal but I figured it would be like pissing in the wind.

So that's my story. I did have a guy that I served with tell me that I should tell the VA I'm an alcoholic. I guess he knew people that figured out a story to get to 100%. No need to make stuff up. But I can understand how the system can be abused. Just like any other government program that provides funds to people. Some are always going to find a way to get over. And some that deserve it will go without because of many different reasons.
I would suggest you hire one of the attorneys that get a small cut if you win.
If you win you will get back money.
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
The load out a Marine can have with his ruck and weapon systems can hit 120 lbs.
With compression my son has lost 1 1/2" in hight in the last 3 years.
Having done pre-gunpowder historical reenactment since 1978, that load out of the basic mud fighter (80 to 120 pounds) has not changed in over 2000 years.
 

Monello

Yeah, whatever
PREMO Member
Having done pre-gunpowder historical reenactment since 1978, that load out of the basic mud fighter (80 to 120 pounds) has not changed in over 2000 years.
What I think you will find that changed is the size of the person carrying that load. I recall somewhere in our travels that I read a civil war soldier was on average around 140 pounds.

A 2003 study by the Marine Corps showed the average marine male at 169 pounds and a female marine at 130 pounds. Ideal ruck weights for each would be 56 for males and 42 for females.

An interesting subject for sure.

The Overweight Infantryman - Modern War Institute (usma.edu)
 

black dog

Free America
What I think you will find that changed is the size of the person carrying that load. I recall somewhere in our travels that I read a civil war soldier was on average around 140 pounds.

A 2003 study by the Marine Corps showed the average marine male at 169 pounds and a female marine at 130 pounds. Ideal ruck weights for each would be 56 for males and 42 for females.

An interesting subject for sure.

The Overweight Infantryman - Modern War Institute (usma.edu)
Thats a good article. :patriot:
My son went in at 196 and now weighs 171lbs.
 
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black dog

Free America
Having done pre-gunpowder historical reenactment since 1978, that load out of the basic mud fighter (80 to 120 pounds) has not changed in over 2000 years.
With having done a few modern deployments in real time and in color between 76 & 1982 I never had a ruck including my weapon system that weighed more than 80lbs. My great-grandfathers and their brothers carried about 40lbs.
The loads and gear the infantry men carry now are insane.
 

spr1975wshs

Mostly settled in...
PREMO Member
With having done a few modern deployments in real time and in color between 76 & 1982 I never had a ruck including my weapon system that weighed more than 80lbs. My great-grandfathers and their brothers carried about 40lbs.
The loads and gear the infantry men carry now are insane.
I portrayed one of "Marius' Mules," as a 1st century Roman-Briton, my kit, including armor and weapons, was a full English hundredweight (112 pounds). My kit for portrayals of 8th, 11th, 14th and 15th century warriors was a little less.

I've been looking at my armor pieces. If I still fit into one of the 4 sets (or a mishmash, will ask the wife to take a picture of me geared up for the battle line, not the march.
 
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