Verizon Service in/around Pax

GeorgiaCorgi

New Member
Company just switched from ATT to Verizon. Even though I have full signal strength 4G in many places on base the data is almost unusable. I have run speed tests and get from 0.02mbps to 0.7mbps. Thats 2G speeds!

Is this a temporary thing? Is it because thousands of people on base are using Verizon and killing the connection?

ATT wouldn't work in half the buildings on base, but when I did get a signal (even a weak one) it would be at least 2-3mbps.
 

RoseRed

American Beauty
PREMO Member
Company just switched from ATT to Verizon. Even though I have full signal strength 4G in many places on base the data is almost unusable. I have run speed tests and get from 0.02mbps to 0.7mbps. Thats 2G speeds!

Is this a temporary thing? Is it because thousands of people on base are using Verizon and killing the connection?

ATT wouldn't work in half the buildings on base, but when I did get a signal (even a weak one) it would be at least 2-3mbps.
Where on base?
 

RoseRed

American Beauty
PREMO Member
I checked at the IPT building, Subway, the post office, and the River's Edge.

If you are getting better service, can you tell me where you are?
My various locations have been at 2185, 2187 and out at River's Edge. Never any problems, unless located inside a closed in area.
 

Goldenhawk

Member
I have Verizon.

I've never had any problems with voice connections on base. But even with a very strong signal strength, I've had consistently lousy LTE data speeds on base for a few years. I'm used to waiting several seconds until data starts flowing, and even then it is far too slow for video or downloads.

The southeast corner has always been the worst for me, but all across base is pretty slow. If I really want to get something done on my cell, I switch off LTE and use the 3G connection instead - it's a lot faster. But that workaround won't work forever - Verizon is phasing out the 3G system entirely.

The problem comes from the fundamental cell system design; towers have sets of directional-capable antennae that can be "beam steered" to maximize signal strength in a certain direction. (That's why they often have a triangular set of 9 antennae pointing in three directions.) We have 10,000 people on base who all are desperately trying to bypass the equally horrid NMCI system. So the few cell towers in the vicinity of the base are all overloaded by shoveling vast amounts of data through the fixed number of LTE connections that can be beam-steered in the direction of the crowded base.

You'll find the same thing happen anytime you go to an event with a huge crowd (NFL game, or big outdoor concert). Put tens of thousands of people in a very small geographical area, and the LTE speeds for everybody will drop like a rock, sometimes to "just can't get any data" levels. There just are not enough channels available for that many signals.

The only thing to fix it would be more cell towers. I just saw a new tower going up near the Hermanville/235 intersection - I'm hopeful that will help.
 

GeorgiaCorgi

New Member
Are there really that many more people using Verizon on the base than ATT? I thought the government provided phones used ATT now also. I have had consistently good speeds with ATT, just poor signal reception when inside buildings.
 

Goldenhawk

Member
Are there really that many more people using Verizon on the base than ATT? I thought the government provided phones used ATT now also. I have had consistently good speeds with ATT, just poor signal reception when inside buildings.
I have no idea of the actual ratios - nobody shares detailed customer counts for a given area - but I would assume that it's typical of the ratio of customers between the major cell providers - Verizon & ATT at about 33% each.
https://www.statista.com/statistics/199359/market-share-of-wireless-carriers-in-the-us-by-subscriptions/

Given the cell system design, I don't think Verizon is alone in wrestling with how to handle huge numbers of customers in a small space. But the matter might be worse (I don't have any data) for one company than another merely due to how many cell towers they have placed in proximity to those problem spots. Again, something that's hard to find data to analyze.
 

gemma_rae

Well-Known Member
First, let me say that a hand held device is a sophisticated two-way radio between the device itself and the tower antenna that see's your device. Beyond that it is a land-line from the tower antenna to the local Central Office and subject to the same limitations as that of the land-line network.

That said, it sounds like an office supervision issue. Office supervision is not a person, it is parameters of the equipment, one of which is concentration which address' call volume and is generally 3 to 1 in the ESS switch. It's a fancy way of saying the office is only capable of connecting 1 of every 3 callers at any given time, which is fine if the call volume hasn't doubled or tripled or more in the last decade.


Remember when you were little and it snowed, and you tried to call during a snow storm to see if school was open but couldn't get a dial tone? Same thing.
 
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