When It Comes to Trump, Mattis Is No Hero

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
There is an extraordinarily self-serving chapter in Bob Woodward’s new book, Rage, which relays a conversation between then-former Defense Secretary James Mattis and then-Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, in which the two contemplate taking “collective action” against the president of United States.

Here’s the snippet:

“I haven’t spoken out,” Mattis commiserated. He had maintained his silence since his resignation in December. “I’ve made my case before the president. He listened. In the end he just didn’t agree with me.” Trump’s disdain for the allies and decision to pull out of Syria with no warning, no consultation, had been Mattis’s red line. “I’ve buried too many boys. That was a terrible decision.”
“This is not good,” Mattis said. “Maybe at some point we’re going to have to stand up and speak out. There may be a time when we have to take collective action.”
“Well, possibly,” Coats said. “Yeah, there may.”
“He’s dangerous,” Mattis said. “He’s unfit.”
Though Woodward attempts to portray Mattis as the noble protagonist of the Trump era — oh, look, there’s the general sneaking into the National Cathedral, a busy tourist attraction, to pray for the soul of the nation — the attempt backfires. Clandestine conversations about collectively preventing the president from engaging in his preferred — and completely legal — foreign-policy goals are probably exhilarating to readers of resistance porn. But, in this country, the efficacy and morality of those foreign-policy goals are debated in the public arena and decided on Election Day. We are not ruled by generals in America.

It is unclear exactly what Mattis was referring to with his talk of “collective action” against the president. But it certainly wasn’t a mere airing of grievances. Coats himself confirms this when he tells Mattis that “speaking out didn’t seem to work.”

Mattis could have spoken out. In December 2018 he resigned after disagreeing with Trump on the question of withdrawal from Syria — a move that the president had promised to make numerous times during the 2016 campaign. It wasn’t until June of 2020 that Mattis told the Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg that he had come to the realization that Trump was a threat to the Constitution just that weekend. But, given that the scene in Woodward’s book occurred in 2019, that can’t be true. Or, Woodward’s account can’t be true. Or both. Either way, it is difficult to escape the feeling that Mattis’s core problem with Trump is over policy. In Woodward’s book, Mattis complains that Trump made “a terrible decision,” that he “didn’t agree with me,” and he crossed what Woodward describes as his “red line.” :tantrum

That Trump’s political choices aren’t favored by Washington’s entrenched foreign-policy elites — people who have been wrong so often that they make the Congressional Budget Office look like Nostradamus — is unsurprising. But it’s worth noting that Mattis’s record here is hardly spotless. Mattis alleges that he no longer could stomach Trump’s “disdain” for the allies. On Tuesday, Trump held a press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the foreign ministers of the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, Arab countries that have normalized agreements with the Jewish State. This alone is a bigger foreign-policy victory than anything accomplished by Obama — who had great “disdain” for long-standing allies such as Israel.






Hey Mattis

IT'S NOT YOUR DECISION OR CHOICE .....

If you work for the Administration, You Work for the People ass hole, not the other way around.

WE Hired Trump aka Elected Him President, to do a JOB, step up or step off .....


So Trump is ' unfit ' for NOT Making Decisions Mattis deems correct

There seems to be a lot of that going around - Vindman the Whistle Blower through the same tantrum ......

:drama: Trump ignored me, I know better .... I swear I wish Trump could put these ass holes against a wall and execute them
 
Reactions: BOP

Hijinx

Well-Known Member
May I ask what terrible has come about because of this withdrawal?

Mattis speaks as though it were a terrible decision, yet Trump made it and it hasn't worked out so badly.
Was Trump right and Mattis wrong.?
 

gunsmoke

Active Member
There is an extraordinarily self-serving chapter in Bob Woodward’s new book, Rage, which relays a conversation between then-former Defense Secretary James Mattis and then-Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, in which the two contemplate taking “collective action” against the president of United States.

Here’s the snippet:



Though Woodward attempts to portray Mattis as the noble protagonist of the Trump era — oh, look, there’s the general sneaking into the National Cathedral, a busy tourist attraction, to pray for the soul of the nation — the attempt backfires. Clandestine conversations about collectively preventing the president from engaging in his preferred — and completely legal — foreign-policy goals are probably exhilarating to readers of resistance porn. But, in this country, the efficacy and morality of those foreign-policy goals are debated in the public arena and decided on Election Day. We are not ruled by generals in America.

It is unclear exactly what Mattis was referring to with his talk of “collective action” against the president. But it certainly wasn’t a mere airing of grievances. Coats himself confirms this when he tells Mattis that “speaking out didn’t seem to work.”

Mattis could have spoken out. In December 2018 he resigned after disagreeing with Trump on the question of withdrawal from Syria — a move that the president had promised to make numerous times during the 2016 campaign. It wasn’t until June of 2020 that Mattis told the Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg that he had come to the realization that Trump was a threat to the Constitution just that weekend. But, given that the scene in Woodward’s book occurred in 2019, that can’t be true. Or, Woodward’s account can’t be true. Or both. Either way, it is difficult to escape the feeling that Mattis’s core problem with Trump is over policy. In Woodward’s book, Mattis complains that Trump made “a terrible decision,” that he “didn’t agree with me,” and he crossed what Woodward describes as his “red line.” :tantrum

That Trump’s political choices aren’t favored by Washington’s entrenched foreign-policy elites — people who have been wrong so often that they make the Congressional Budget Office look like Nostradamus — is unsurprising. But it’s worth noting that Mattis’s record here is hardly spotless. Mattis alleges that he no longer could stomach Trump’s “disdain” for the allies. On Tuesday, Trump held a press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the foreign ministers of the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, Arab countries that have normalized agreements with the Jewish State. This alone is a bigger foreign-policy victory than anything accomplished by Obama — who had great “disdain” for long-standing allies such as Israel.






Hey Mattis

IT'S NOT YOUR DECISION OR CHOICE .....

If you work for the Administration, You Work for the People ass hole, not the other way around.

WE Hired Trump aka Elected Him President, to do a JOB, step up or step off .....


So Trump is ' unfit ' for NOT Making Decisions Mattis deems correct

There seems to be a lot of that going around - Vindman the Whistle Blower through the same tantrum ......

:drama: Trump ignored me, I know better .... I swear I wish Trump could put these ass holes against a wall and execute them
Hey bot,

The people didn't vote for Trump. The Electoral College did. Trump LOST the vote of the people.

Odd you haven't figured that out yet.

And, BTW, the President ALSO works for the people...ALL the people, not just the minority who voted for him--who he obviously doesn't care about either.

But you keep trolling bot.....keep trying.
 

gunsmoke

Active Member
May I ask what terrible has come about because of this withdrawal?

Mattis speaks as though it were a terrible decision, yet Trump made it and it hasn't worked out so badly.
Was Trump right and Mattis wrong.?
Yeah...it's been more than a few days. Why would you remember? Or bother to look it up?
 

BOP

Well-Known Member
May I ask what terrible has come about because of this withdrawal?

Mattis speaks as though it were a terrible decision, yet Trump made it and it hasn't worked out so badly.
Was Trump right and Mattis wrong.?
It's bad because it potentially affects the bottom line for all those involved in the military-industrial complex.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
Time to dust this off .....

Every post you make is against anyone or any group that doesn't conform to your propagandist viewpoints.
The people didn't vote for Trump. The Electoral College did.
Ah yes pedantic word games ...

You can offer no counter points, because you know I am correct in my assertion;

Mattis works for the President and should support the President not foment dissension and a strife or resign [ which he finally did ]

No you make childish statements ... :drama:
 

stgislander

Well-Known Member
PREMO Member
Time to dust this off .....





Ah yes pedantic word games ...

You can offer no counter points, because you know I am correct in my assertion;

Mattis works for the President and should support the President not foment dissension and a strife or resign [ which he finally did ]

No you make childish statements ... :drama:
Can you find the one where Tranny said Hillary won the Popular vote?
 
Time to dust this off .....





Ah yes pedantic word games ...

You can offer no counter points, because you know I am correct in my assertion;

Mattis works for the President and should support the President not foment dissension and a strife or resign [ which he finally did ]

No you make childish statements ... :drama:

Mattis has fealty to the Constitution and the Constitution only you dope. "Chain of command" is but a mere social construct with little meaning.
 
Top