Wizards Of The Coast Is Making Major Changes

GURPS

INGSOC
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Last week, a report emerged from Gizmodo that said D&D publisher Wizards of the Coast would be revising its Open Gaming License for the game, a document that so far has allowed a huge range of independent publishers to create their own games based on the basic D&D ruleset. The revisions would mean that fans and third-party publishers would be restricted in what they can make, as well as anyone making money having to report products to Wizards of the Coast directly. Now, Wizards of the Coast has released a statement on the situation through a blog post, and shared its plans going forward.

The post explains that there were three main goals in wanting to revise the OGL, the first being that it prevents D&D from being used in "hateful and discriminatory products." The second goal was that it wanted to make clear that OGL content could only be used for "tabletop role-playing content like campaigns, modules, and supplements," as opposed to controversial tech like web3, blockchain games, and NFTs. And the last goal was that "the OGL is for the content creator, the homebrewer, the aspiring designer, our players, and the community--not major corporations to use for their own commercial and promotional purpose."

Apparently some content creators and publishers were provided early drafts over the new OGL to gather feedback, with certain royalty language "designed to apply to large corporations attempting to use OGL content. It was never [Wizard of the Coast's] intent to impact the vast majority of the community."

There are still plans to create a revised version of the OGL, with the intent to "specify that it covers only content for TTRPGs," meaning "other expressions, such as educational and charitable campaigns, livestreams, cosplay, VTT-uses, etc., will remain unaffected by any OGL update," and content released under the original OGL will not be affected either.



 

spr1975wshs

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A LOT of chatter about this on Twitter.

I have not bought anything Hasbro/WOTC since Milton Bradley, a beloved former employer, was killed by Hasbro in 2009.
 

ThatOneNerd

Member
WOTC had this coming to them to be honest
From the goofy non-troversies to pushing everything online under ridiculous paywalls to the OGL, they took the franchise and rammed it into the ground
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member
From the goofy non-troversies to pushing everything online under ridiculous paywalls to the OGL, they took the franchise and rammed it into the ground


Well I'm not sure how much is Wotwc or Hasbro trying to ring out as much cash as possible


but the changes started with the race changes started

Orcs = Africans
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

D&D will move to a Creative Commons license, requests feedback on a new OGL




Thursday’s release of the OGL 1.2 draft is accompanied by a much kinder tone — more in line with a second apology delivered on Wednesday. There’s a surprise as well: Wizards is opting here for a Creative Commons license. Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that, by its own description, “helps overcome legal obstacles to the sharing of knowledge and creativity to address the world’s most pressing challenges.” As such, a Creative Commons license once enacted could ultimately put the OGL 1.2 outside of Wizards’ control in perpetuity.

“We’re giving the core D&D mechanics to the community through a Creative Commons license, which means that they are fully in your hands,” Brink said in the blog post. “If you want to use quintessentially D&D content from the SRD such as owlbears and magic missile, OGL 1.2 will provide you a perpetual, irrevocable license to do so.”

So much trust has been lost over the last several weeks that it will no doubt take a while for legal experts — armchair and otherwise — to pour over the details of the new OGL. But here are the bullet points that Wizards is promoting in this official statement:

- Protecting D&D’s inclusive play experience. As I said above, content more clearly associated with D&D (like the classes, spells, and monsters) is what falls under the OGL. You’ll see that OGL 1.2 lets us act when offensive or hurtful content is published using the covered D&D stuff. We want an inclusive, safe play experience for everyone. This is deeply important to us, and OGL 1.0a didn’t give us any ability to ensure it
- TTRPGs and VTTs. OGL 1.2 will only apply to TTRPG content, whether published as books, as electronic publications, or on virtual tabletops (VTTs). Nobody needs to wonder or worry if it applies to anything else. It doesn’t.
- Deauthorizing OGL 1.0a. We know this is a big concern. The Creative Commons license and the open terms of 1.2 are intended to help with that. One key reason why we have to deauthorize: We can’t use the protective options in 1.2 if someone can just choose to publish harmful, discriminatory, or illegal content under 1.0a. And again, any content you have already published under OGL 1.0a will still always be licensed under OGL 1.0a.
- Very limited license changes allowed. Only two sections can be changed once OGL 1.2 is live: how you cite Wizards in your work and how we can contact each other. We don’t know what the future holds or what technologies we will use to communicate with each other, so we thought these two sections needed to be future-proofed.
 

GURPS

INGSOC
PREMO Member

D&D maker still wants to revoke earlier versions of “open” gaming license




Dungeons and Dragons (D&D)-maker Wizards of the Coast's (WotC) latest attempt to update its decades-old Open Gaming License (OGL) still includes the controversial statement that "the Open Game License 1.0a is no longer an authorized license." The news comes after the company's first attempt to draft an OGL update with similar language (and other controversial changes) was met with widespread fan outrage and alienation from the creator community.

WotC says this proposed "deauthorization" of OGL v1.0a won't affect any original content that was published under that earlier license since its debut in the early '00s and that such content won't need to be updated or relicensed to comply with any new OGL language. But any content published after the proposed OGL v1.2 goes into effect would not be able to simply choose the earlier license instead, according to the update as drafted.

In an explanatory post on the D&D Beyond blog, WotC Executive Producer Kyle Brink said that WotC realizes this planned deauthorization is a "big concern" for the community. But he added that it's a necessary move to enforce the new OGL's restrictions on illegal and/or hateful content, including "conduct that is harmful, discriminatory, illegal, obscene, or harassing," as determined by WotC.
 

spr1975wshs

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GURPS

INGSOC
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